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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 948627 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

0

The Countdown begins. on 12:30 - Aug 4 with 2750 viewsShaky


Misology -- It's a bitch
Poll: Greatest PS Troll Hunter of all time

1
The Countdown begins. on 12:53 - Aug 4 with 2728 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 12:30 - Aug 4 by Shaky



Mark Carney has been putting his own personal agenda before the country since well before we voted he leave. He’s a disgrace. He knows full well the strength of his position and what negative assumptions can do. If he’s got not nothing positive to say then keep it shut. You think he’d shy away slightly from making outlandish assumptions on brexit given his form. Nice to see the head of British Airways practically saying all the panic over this no deal is nonsense.
1
The Countdown begins. on 13:15 - Aug 4 with 2704 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 08:38 - Aug 4 by Kilkennyjack

Carney is a professional.

The likes of yourself and Moggs are just guessing.

I know who i believe.


His predecessor has a completely different outlook. He’s even called for a hard brexit in the past. He is also a professional. Perhaps they are all guessing?

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Poll: The official planetswans European election poll. Your vote goes to?

1
The Countdown begins. on 14:16 - Aug 4 with 2678 viewsShaky

The Countdown begins. on 12:53 - Aug 4 by Jango

Mark Carney has been putting his own personal agenda before the country since well before we voted he leave. He’s a disgrace. He knows full well the strength of his position and what negative assumptions can do. If he’s got not nothing positive to say then keep it shut. You think he’d shy away slightly from making outlandish assumptions on brexit given his form. Nice to see the head of British Airways practically saying all the panic over this no deal is nonsense.


You do understand that Carney isn't the one making the economic forecasts, don't you?

The Bank of England has a team of economists led by BoE chief economist Andy Haldane, who oversee a seriously complicated economic computer model based on numerous variables that churns our forecasts under a range of assumptions.

Carney is simply the front man for this considerable effort.

Now what was it you were saying about his personal agenda?

Misology -- It's a bitch
Poll: Greatest PS Troll Hunter of all time

1
The Countdown begins. on 15:23 - Aug 4 with 2646 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 12:53 - Aug 4 by Jango

Mark Carney has been putting his own personal agenda before the country since well before we voted he leave. He’s a disgrace. He knows full well the strength of his position and what negative assumptions can do. If he’s got not nothing positive to say then keep it shut. You think he’d shy away slightly from making outlandish assumptions on brexit given his form. Nice to see the head of British Airways practically saying all the panic over this no deal is nonsense.


It’s the UK’s national bank. You are obviously unaware of its role and importance.

Willie Walsh only referred to flights over Irish air space, not that I’d take anything that the clown said seriously anyway.
0

The Countdown begins. on 21:12 - Aug 4 with 2598 viewsShaky

Labour heading off piste on Trade (and the EU):
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jeremy Corbyn ditches consensus to reject EU trade deals
Labour leadership has opened itself up to accusations it has embraced protectionism
By Alan Beattie in Brussels and Jim Pickard in London

FT, 3 August 2018

There have been so many splits inside the Labour party under Jeremy Corbyn’s leftwing leadership — on issues ranging from anti-Semitism to Syria — that a growing division over Britain’s role in global trade has passed almost unnoticed.

Yet, as the UK moves towards Brexit, and its trading relations with the EU and the wider world become central to its economic future, experts said the Labour leadership’s increasing scepticism about the rules governing world trade could assume much greater importance.

In a speech last week, Mr Corbyn argued that the government should spend far more supporting UK manufacturers, as he attacked Theresa May for awarding a contract to produce British passports to a French company. He also chided the prime minister for pursuing a post-Brexit free trade deal with the US, and he called for some World Trade Organization and EU rules on government procurement and state aid to be suspended to help UK industries.

The launch of Mr Corbyn’s “Build it in Britain” campaign prompted accusations from business that he was pursuing a protectionist agenda, as well as comparisons with US President Donald Trump’s “America first” strategy to back domestic industries.

Although he denies embracing protectionism, Mr Corbyn has broken with a 20-year plus political consensus involving the Conservatives and Labour in which the two main parties both supported WTO rules and trade deals made by the EU.

Mr Corbyn’s opposition to recent trade agreements the EU has concluded with other countries has antagonised Labour MPs to the right of him, who argue that his stance is based on hostility to competition. Some of these Labour MPs also dislike Mr Corbyn’s longstanding Euroscepticism.

The splits inside Labour over the party leadership’s rejection of EU trade deals have unleashed parliamentary rebellions. In June, 14 Labour MPs voted for a trade deal between the EU and Canada, ignoring orders from the leadership to abstain. On the same day 17 Labour MPs again defied the leadership to support a trade deal between the EU and Japan.

Chris Leslie, a centrist, pro-EU Labour MP who has criticised Mr Corbyn’s policies, said there was a trend for populist politicians to dislike trade deals because they tend to involve compromises.

He added one reason that the Labour leadership would not support Britain staying in the EU single market after Brexit was because it wants “to end the fettering of the government from expropriating assets or taking an anti-competitive approach to industry”.

“You saw some of that in Jeremy Corbyn’s speech,” said Mr Leslie. “It’s quite a populist approach, ‘Let’s stop buying foreign’. You had ‘Make America great’, now it’s ‘Make Britain great’.”

Barry Gardiner, Labour’s trade spokesman, insisted the party leadership was not against commerce and investment in principle, but it thought the current dominant model of trade agreements removed far too much power from countries to regulate. “It’s about leaving space for governments to act rather than opening themselves up to one-way liberalisation,” he added.

Mr Gardiner said so-called investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms, which allow companies to sue governments for unfair treatment, were particularly egregious. But Labour continued to reject EU trade deals even after Brussels revised the mechanism in the Canada pact and then removed it altogether from the Japan agreement.

In fact, the Labour leadership’s opposition goes much deeper, to cover the whole process of deregulating service industries such as telecoms and transport in trade agreements.

Experts said there has been a suspicion on the Labour left of free trade and constraints on state aid — and the EU’s role in promoting them — dating back to the 1970s. This has been exacerbated more recently by a concern about trade deals privatising public services.

A proposed trade deal between the EU and the US — negotiations for which were launched in 2013 and are now in abeyance — provoked fierce opposition among anti-globalisation campaigners and trade unions.

In the UK, campaigners argued the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership would be used to break up the National Health Service by allowing in private healthcare providers from the US. Ed Miliband, Mr Corbyn’s centrist predecessor as Labour leader, said the NHS could be protected in the EU-US trade deal, but sceptics rejected proposed safeguards to carve out public services from deregulation as inadequate.

Observers and participants in these debates said John Hilary, Labour’s head of trade policy since last year, was behind the party leadership’s opposition to the EU’s trade deals.

Mr Hilary, who supported Brexit, was deeply involved in protests against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and once said that the EU has an “extreme neoliberal agenda at the expense of social and environmental rights”.

A former trade policy analyst who worked alongside Mr Hilary during the 2000s said: “To call John’s worldview Manichean would be to give it greater nuance and flexibility than was justified. In his mind there is only one mental compartment to put business or trade deals in, and it’s one labelled ‘exploitative capitalist bastards’.”

Mr Hilary declined to comment.

David Henig, UK director of the European Centre for International Political Economy, a think-tank, said Mr Corbyn was tapping into a continental European network of radical left parties, campaigns and trade unions that oppose all trade deals.

Mr Gardiner said Labour was developing its own model for trade deals that focused on workers’ rights and small companies rather than multinational groups, and was consulting on the issue. “We want to do due diligence and look at all sectors that might be affected by deregulation and get the policy right,” he added.

But Sam Lowe, senior research fellow at the Centre for European Reform, another think-tank, said such efforts had yet to bear fruit. “We know very well what Corbyn is against on trade but not much about what he has to replace it with,” he added.

https://www.ft.com/content/83bf119e-970e-11e8-b747-fb1e803ee64e

Misology -- It's a bitch
Poll: Greatest PS Troll Hunter of all time

1
The Countdown begins. on 21:49 - Aug 4 with 2590 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 21:12 - Aug 4 by Shaky

Labour heading off piste on Trade (and the EU):
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jeremy Corbyn ditches consensus to reject EU trade deals
Labour leadership has opened itself up to accusations it has embraced protectionism
By Alan Beattie in Brussels and Jim Pickard in London

FT, 3 August 2018

There have been so many splits inside the Labour party under Jeremy Corbyn’s leftwing leadership — on issues ranging from anti-Semitism to Syria — that a growing division over Britain’s role in global trade has passed almost unnoticed.

Yet, as the UK moves towards Brexit, and its trading relations with the EU and the wider world become central to its economic future, experts said the Labour leadership’s increasing scepticism about the rules governing world trade could assume much greater importance.

In a speech last week, Mr Corbyn argued that the government should spend far more supporting UK manufacturers, as he attacked Theresa May for awarding a contract to produce British passports to a French company. He also chided the prime minister for pursuing a post-Brexit free trade deal with the US, and he called for some World Trade Organization and EU rules on government procurement and state aid to be suspended to help UK industries.

The launch of Mr Corbyn’s “Build it in Britain” campaign prompted accusations from business that he was pursuing a protectionist agenda, as well as comparisons with US President Donald Trump’s “America first” strategy to back domestic industries.

Although he denies embracing protectionism, Mr Corbyn has broken with a 20-year plus political consensus involving the Conservatives and Labour in which the two main parties both supported WTO rules and trade deals made by the EU.

Mr Corbyn’s opposition to recent trade agreements the EU has concluded with other countries has antagonised Labour MPs to the right of him, who argue that his stance is based on hostility to competition. Some of these Labour MPs also dislike Mr Corbyn’s longstanding Euroscepticism.

The splits inside Labour over the party leadership’s rejection of EU trade deals have unleashed parliamentary rebellions. In June, 14 Labour MPs voted for a trade deal between the EU and Canada, ignoring orders from the leadership to abstain. On the same day 17 Labour MPs again defied the leadership to support a trade deal between the EU and Japan.

Chris Leslie, a centrist, pro-EU Labour MP who has criticised Mr Corbyn’s policies, said there was a trend for populist politicians to dislike trade deals because they tend to involve compromises.

He added one reason that the Labour leadership would not support Britain staying in the EU single market after Brexit was because it wants “to end the fettering of the government from expropriating assets or taking an anti-competitive approach to industry”.

“You saw some of that in Jeremy Corbyn’s speech,” said Mr Leslie. “It’s quite a populist approach, ‘Let’s stop buying foreign’. You had ‘Make America great’, now it’s ‘Make Britain great’.”

Barry Gardiner, Labour’s trade spokesman, insisted the party leadership was not against commerce and investment in principle, but it thought the current dominant model of trade agreements removed far too much power from countries to regulate. “It’s about leaving space for governments to act rather than opening themselves up to one-way liberalisation,” he added.

Mr Gardiner said so-called investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms, which allow companies to sue governments for unfair treatment, were particularly egregious. But Labour continued to reject EU trade deals even after Brussels revised the mechanism in the Canada pact and then removed it altogether from the Japan agreement.

In fact, the Labour leadership’s opposition goes much deeper, to cover the whole process of deregulating service industries such as telecoms and transport in trade agreements.

Experts said there has been a suspicion on the Labour left of free trade and constraints on state aid — and the EU’s role in promoting them — dating back to the 1970s. This has been exacerbated more recently by a concern about trade deals privatising public services.

A proposed trade deal between the EU and the US — negotiations for which were launched in 2013 and are now in abeyance — provoked fierce opposition among anti-globalisation campaigners and trade unions.

In the UK, campaigners argued the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership would be used to break up the National Health Service by allowing in private healthcare providers from the US. Ed Miliband, Mr Corbyn’s centrist predecessor as Labour leader, said the NHS could be protected in the EU-US trade deal, but sceptics rejected proposed safeguards to carve out public services from deregulation as inadequate.

Observers and participants in these debates said John Hilary, Labour’s head of trade policy since last year, was behind the party leadership’s opposition to the EU’s trade deals.

Mr Hilary, who supported Brexit, was deeply involved in protests against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and once said that the EU has an “extreme neoliberal agenda at the expense of social and environmental rights”.

A former trade policy analyst who worked alongside Mr Hilary during the 2000s said: “To call John’s worldview Manichean would be to give it greater nuance and flexibility than was justified. In his mind there is only one mental compartment to put business or trade deals in, and it’s one labelled ‘exploitative capitalist bastards’.”

Mr Hilary declined to comment.

David Henig, UK director of the European Centre for International Political Economy, a think-tank, said Mr Corbyn was tapping into a continental European network of radical left parties, campaigns and trade unions that oppose all trade deals.

Mr Gardiner said Labour was developing its own model for trade deals that focused on workers’ rights and small companies rather than multinational groups, and was consulting on the issue. “We want to do due diligence and look at all sectors that might be affected by deregulation and get the policy right,” he added.

But Sam Lowe, senior research fellow at the Centre for European Reform, another think-tank, said such efforts had yet to bear fruit. “We know very well what Corbyn is against on trade but not much about what he has to replace it with,” he added.

https://www.ft.com/content/83bf119e-970e-11e8-b747-fb1e803ee64e


Oh shut up you boring tw@t. Swans played and won today. Just to let you know.
1
The Countdown begins. on 22:33 - Aug 4 with 2580 viewsDJack

The Countdown begins. on 21:49 - Aug 4 by peenemunde

Oh shut up you boring tw@t. Swans played and won today. Just to let you know.


Oh dear, diversionary tactics fail... A thread on economic disaster hurts you so much you bring the swans into it. Which is strange as most of your posts don't involve the swans - before you gob off I suggest you analyse your post count. Off you fcuk!

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. - Carl Sagan

0
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The Countdown begins. on 22:45 - Aug 4 with 2563 viewsKilkennyjack

The Countdown begins. on 22:33 - Aug 4 by DJack

Oh dear, diversionary tactics fail... A thread on economic disaster hurts you so much you bring the swans into it. Which is strange as most of your posts don't involve the swans - before you gob off I suggest you analyse your post count. Off you fcuk!


👏👏👏👏

Penny is a fanny merchant.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

0
The Countdown begins. on 06:31 - Aug 5 with 2525 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 22:33 - Aug 4 by DJack

Oh dear, diversionary tactics fail... A thread on economic disaster hurts you so much you bring the swans into it. Which is strange as most of your posts don't involve the swans - before you gob off I suggest you analyse your post count. Off you fcuk!


Have a look on the dates I’ve posted regarding Brexit.
You’ll find 99% are on days when the Swans aren’t playing.

As for economic disaster, don’t worry- you will still receive your dole money post Brexit. 👍
1
The Countdown begins. on 08:47 - Aug 5 with 2514 viewspikeypaul

The Countdown begins. on 21:49 - Aug 4 by peenemunde

Oh shut up you boring tw@t. Swans played and won today. Just to let you know.


Exactly all the boring w@nker does is trawl the Internet and copy and paste project fear stories one sad fecker.

236 AFLI

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

0
The Countdown begins. on 13:18 - Aug 5 with 2474 viewslonglostjack

The Countdown begins. on 21:12 - Aug 4 by Shaky

Labour heading off piste on Trade (and the EU):
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jeremy Corbyn ditches consensus to reject EU trade deals
Labour leadership has opened itself up to accusations it has embraced protectionism
By Alan Beattie in Brussels and Jim Pickard in London

FT, 3 August 2018

There have been so many splits inside the Labour party under Jeremy Corbyn’s leftwing leadership — on issues ranging from anti-Semitism to Syria — that a growing division over Britain’s role in global trade has passed almost unnoticed.

Yet, as the UK moves towards Brexit, and its trading relations with the EU and the wider world become central to its economic future, experts said the Labour leadership’s increasing scepticism about the rules governing world trade could assume much greater importance.

In a speech last week, Mr Corbyn argued that the government should spend far more supporting UK manufacturers, as he attacked Theresa May for awarding a contract to produce British passports to a French company. He also chided the prime minister for pursuing a post-Brexit free trade deal with the US, and he called for some World Trade Organization and EU rules on government procurement and state aid to be suspended to help UK industries.

The launch of Mr Corbyn’s “Build it in Britain” campaign prompted accusations from business that he was pursuing a protectionist agenda, as well as comparisons with US President Donald Trump’s “America first” strategy to back domestic industries.

Although he denies embracing protectionism, Mr Corbyn has broken with a 20-year plus political consensus involving the Conservatives and Labour in which the two main parties both supported WTO rules and trade deals made by the EU.

Mr Corbyn’s opposition to recent trade agreements the EU has concluded with other countries has antagonised Labour MPs to the right of him, who argue that his stance is based on hostility to competition. Some of these Labour MPs also dislike Mr Corbyn’s longstanding Euroscepticism.

The splits inside Labour over the party leadership’s rejection of EU trade deals have unleashed parliamentary rebellions. In June, 14 Labour MPs voted for a trade deal between the EU and Canada, ignoring orders from the leadership to abstain. On the same day 17 Labour MPs again defied the leadership to support a trade deal between the EU and Japan.

Chris Leslie, a centrist, pro-EU Labour MP who has criticised Mr Corbyn’s policies, said there was a trend for populist politicians to dislike trade deals because they tend to involve compromises.

He added one reason that the Labour leadership would not support Britain staying in the EU single market after Brexit was because it wants “to end the fettering of the government from expropriating assets or taking an anti-competitive approach to industry”.

“You saw some of that in Jeremy Corbyn’s speech,” said Mr Leslie. “It’s quite a populist approach, ‘Let’s stop buying foreign’. You had ‘Make America great’, now it’s ‘Make Britain great’.”

Barry Gardiner, Labour’s trade spokesman, insisted the party leadership was not against commerce and investment in principle, but it thought the current dominant model of trade agreements removed far too much power from countries to regulate. “It’s about leaving space for governments to act rather than opening themselves up to one-way liberalisation,” he added.

Mr Gardiner said so-called investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms, which allow companies to sue governments for unfair treatment, were particularly egregious. But Labour continued to reject EU trade deals even after Brussels revised the mechanism in the Canada pact and then removed it altogether from the Japan agreement.

In fact, the Labour leadership’s opposition goes much deeper, to cover the whole process of deregulating service industries such as telecoms and transport in trade agreements.

Experts said there has been a suspicion on the Labour left of free trade and constraints on state aid — and the EU’s role in promoting them — dating back to the 1970s. This has been exacerbated more recently by a concern about trade deals privatising public services.

A proposed trade deal between the EU and the US — negotiations for which were launched in 2013 and are now in abeyance — provoked fierce opposition among anti-globalisation campaigners and trade unions.

In the UK, campaigners argued the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership would be used to break up the National Health Service by allowing in private healthcare providers from the US. Ed Miliband, Mr Corbyn’s centrist predecessor as Labour leader, said the NHS could be protected in the EU-US trade deal, but sceptics rejected proposed safeguards to carve out public services from deregulation as inadequate.

Observers and participants in these debates said John Hilary, Labour’s head of trade policy since last year, was behind the party leadership’s opposition to the EU’s trade deals.

Mr Hilary, who supported Brexit, was deeply involved in protests against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and once said that the EU has an “extreme neoliberal agenda at the expense of social and environmental rights”.

A former trade policy analyst who worked alongside Mr Hilary during the 2000s said: “To call John’s worldview Manichean would be to give it greater nuance and flexibility than was justified. In his mind there is only one mental compartment to put business or trade deals in, and it’s one labelled ‘exploitative capitalist bastards’.”

Mr Hilary declined to comment.

David Henig, UK director of the European Centre for International Political Economy, a think-tank, said Mr Corbyn was tapping into a continental European network of radical left parties, campaigns and trade unions that oppose all trade deals.

Mr Gardiner said Labour was developing its own model for trade deals that focused on workers’ rights and small companies rather than multinational groups, and was consulting on the issue. “We want to do due diligence and look at all sectors that might be affected by deregulation and get the policy right,” he added.

But Sam Lowe, senior research fellow at the Centre for European Reform, another think-tank, said such efforts had yet to bear fruit. “We know very well what Corbyn is against on trade but not much about what he has to replace it with,” he added.

https://www.ft.com/content/83bf119e-970e-11e8-b747-fb1e803ee64e


An interesting article Shaky. Corbyn is way off the mark with his opposition to EU trade deals. Under the terms of the recent EU-Japan agreement for example, local municipalities in member states will have the ultimate say in whether utilities are publicly owned or not.

Poll: Who is responsible for the Brexit fiasco?

0

The Countdown begins. on 13:29 - Aug 5 with 2465 viewspikeypaul

No deal is coming home lads and I fecking love it.

236 AFLI

SIUYRL

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

-1
The Countdown begins. on 15:04 - Aug 5 with 2435 viewsShaky

The Countdown begins. on 13:18 - Aug 5 by longlostjack

An interesting article Shaky. Corbyn is way off the mark with his opposition to EU trade deals. Under the terms of the recent EU-Japan agreement for example, local municipalities in member states will have the ultimate say in whether utilities are publicly owned or not.


No FT, no comment used to be their strapline; certainly rings true when perusing the input of the leading Brexiters on this thread!

It is a scandal and a tragedy that so many on both sides of the political isle are inclined to play politics with this situation. That's why I really admire somebody like Anna Soubry. She may be a bit too fond of a tipple in the Commons bar, but she usually speaks her mind.

Labour desperately needs people with some balls to step forward and question the direction the dear leader is going, otherwise Britain is heading for catastrophe.

Misology -- It's a bitch
Poll: Greatest PS Troll Hunter of all time

0
The Countdown begins. on 15:39 - Aug 5 with 2416 viewsDJack

The Countdown begins. on 06:31 - Aug 5 by peenemunde

Have a look on the dates I’ve posted regarding Brexit.
You’ll find 99% are on days when the Swans aren’t playing.

As for economic disaster, don’t worry- you will still receive your dole money post Brexit. 👍


What the heck has that got to do with it. Most of us on here post stuff on the football and non football boards on football days with out issue. As I said most of your posts are not about the Swans.

It's quite funny I point out your diversionary fail and you in your reply don't deal with the points I raised. Then you compound your error by attacking me on a false premise.

You are not very good at this internet stuff are you.

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. - Carl Sagan

1
The Countdown begins. on 16:01 - Aug 5 with 2412 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 15:39 - Aug 5 by DJack

What the heck has that got to do with it. Most of us on here post stuff on the football and non football boards on football days with out issue. As I said most of your posts are not about the Swans.

It's quite funny I point out your diversionary fail and you in your reply don't deal with the points I raised. Then you compound your error by attacking me on a false premise.

You are not very good at this internet stuff are you.


The vast majority of my post are about the Swans, just goes to show you don’t know what you are talking about.

Last 3 months the Swans haven’t been playing, unless you include pre season games.
I’ve also been posting on here for over 5 years.
0
The Countdown begins. on 17:44 - Aug 5 with 2371 viewsDJack

The Countdown begins. on 16:01 - Aug 5 by peenemunde

The vast majority of my post are about the Swans, just goes to show you don’t know what you are talking about.

Last 3 months the Swans haven’t been playing, unless you include pre season games.
I’ve also been posting on here for over 5 years.


After each major embarrassing period you change your name. It is you who regularly displays the inability to know anything about anything of worth...hence why you come back under a new name.

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. - Carl Sagan

1
The Countdown begins. on 19:19 - Aug 5 with 2345 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 17:44 - Aug 5 by DJack

After each major embarrassing period you change your name. It is you who regularly displays the inability to know anything about anything of worth...hence why you come back under a new name.


So you now admit most of my posts on here are Scfc related.
Once again I’ve proven you to be wrong.
You’re 2nd division son.
Please up your game.
-1
The Countdown begins. on 00:22 - Aug 6 with 2293 viewsDJack

The Countdown begins. on 19:19 - Aug 5 by peenemunde

So you now admit most of my posts on here are Scfc related.
Once again I’ve proven you to be wrong.
You’re 2nd division son.
Please up your game.


"So you now admit most of my posts on here are Scfc related. "

Please point out where I've said that...

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. - Carl Sagan

-1
The Countdown begins. on 06:26 - Aug 6 with 2241 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 00:22 - Aug 6 by DJack

"So you now admit most of my posts on here are Scfc related. "

Please point out where I've said that...


You stated that most of my posts were not Scfc related and I pointed out they were.
You then started ranting about me changing my username.
If you know my past usernames you’ll know that vast majority of my posts are Scfc related.

So you don’t have to admit anything for me know that you are wrong, because i already know that you are.
1
The Countdown begins. on 07:48 - Aug 6 with 2223 viewsGowerjack

The Countdown begins. on 06:26 - Aug 6 by peenemunde

You stated that most of my posts were not Scfc related and I pointed out they were.
You then started ranting about me changing my username.
If you know my past usernames you’ll know that vast majority of my posts are Scfc related.

So you don’t have to admit anything for me know that you are wrong, because i already know that you are.


Thick as mince.

Plastic since 1974
Poll: Is ECB for tyranny?

-1
The Countdown begins. on 08:49 - Aug 6 with 2200 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 07:48 - Aug 6 by Gowerjack

Thick as mince.


Bit harsh on mince.
-1

The Countdown begins. on 09:11 - Aug 6 with 2186 viewspikeypaul

235 AFLI

SIUYRL

Start of another week towards the great day not long now guys.

No deal is coming home.

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

1
The Countdown begins. on 09:37 - Aug 6 with 2170 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 09:11 - Aug 6 by pikeypaul

235 AFLI

SIUYRL

Start of another week towards the great day not long now guys.

No deal is coming home.


Exciting times eh, if we crash out on no deal, and amusing the WTO accept our application (revised application taking out our shared schedule of concessions with he EU), we'll be joining Mauritania making it two countries that operate solely on WTO and don't have joint agreements with any other nation.
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The Countdown begins. on 10:05 - Aug 6 with 2161 viewsBatterseajack

This thread is definitely worth a read. The crux of it is that the UK has by far the widest disparity between rich and poor within the EU, yet the the EU is somehow blamed for this when voting leave. Why doesn't this occur in other EU counties? And will the poor be better off when we're outside? This country is on a hiding to nothing with the rent seekers in charge.



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