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The Countdown begins. 23:28 - Nov 10 with 331973 viewspikeypaul



https://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20190329T23&p0=1336&msg=Democr

1:19 pm today was the exact mid point from when the result that the Great British public had decided to leave the EU and the time 11pm March 29th 2019 that Democracy will be delivered.

Happy days.
[Post edited 25 Jun 17:01]

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The Countdown begins. on 13:18 - Aug 29 with 947 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 12:39 - Aug 29 by Jango

It’s not really EU funded though is it. Saying the British government won’t spend on these sort of things if they had the choice is pure speculation and don’t forget the government have to sign off on these things. This below is pure facts.

The UK pays more into the EU budget than it gets back.

In 2016 the UK government paid £13.1 billion to the EU budget, and EU spending on the UK was forecast to be £4.5 billion. So the UK’s ‘net contribution’ was estimated at about £8.6 billion.

Each year the UK gets a discount on its contributions to the EU—the ‘rebate’—worth almost £4 billion last year. Without it the UK would have been liable for £17 billion in contributions.

Being in the EU costs money but does it also create trade, jobs and investment that are worth more?

We can be pretty sure about how much cash we put in, but it’s far harder to be sure about how much, if anything, comes back in economic benefits.


What we pay into the EU is a pittance compared to our GDP, and we were always going to pay more than we take back because we're a wealthy country and we signed up to the rates we pay.


"Being in the EU costs money but does it also create trade, jobs and investment that are worth more? "

*face palm*
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The Countdown begins. on 14:15 - Aug 29 with 917 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 13:18 - Aug 29 by Batterseajack

What we pay into the EU is a pittance compared to our GDP, and we were always going to pay more than we take back because we're a wealthy country and we signed up to the rates we pay.


"Being in the EU costs money but does it also create trade, jobs and investment that are worth more? "

*face palm*


That’s a quote taken from the full fact website which is a very well sourced and highly credible fact checker. Obviously you’re only interested in quotes from random remainers on twitter.

And yes we signed up to the rates we pay and that’s why want out. The likes of Hungary and Latvia who receive far more than they put in are way ahead at the top of table for economic growth while we sit down the bottom and have a country falling apart.
[Post edited 29 Aug 14:20]
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The Countdown begins. on 14:27 - Aug 29 with 901 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 14:15 - Aug 29 by Jango

That’s a quote taken from the full fact website which is a very well sourced and highly credible fact checker. Obviously you’re only interested in quotes from random remainers on twitter.

And yes we signed up to the rates we pay and that’s why want out. The likes of Hungary and Latvia who receive far more than they put in are way ahead at the top of table for economic growth while we sit down the bottom and have a country falling apart.
[Post edited 29 Aug 14:20]


Well you've seemingly cherry picked your quote. Its not hard to find out how much our GDP benefits from having barrier free access to the largest economy right on our doorstep.

Rates are set on GDP not growth.
50% growth from £1 is 50p
0.01% growth from £100 is £1
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The Countdown begins. on 14:37 - Aug 29 with 895 viewsKilkennyjack

The Countdown begins. on 12:38 - Aug 29 by Highjack

The data protection act has always had exemptions for bodies investigating criminality so that won’t have any sort of impact.

Also on Brexit day EU law will become U.K. law so there won’t be any difference between European law and U.K. law that will act as a barrier.

That “framework” you refer to will not change. Sharing information will still happen. It will always happen. If Scotland had taken independence in 2014 do you think communications would have immediately ceased between police in Cumbria and police in say Renfrewshire?

It’s a scare story. Like all the other scare stories that are fired our way on a daily basis by an increasingly desperate and failing media and political class. It’s also a story that doesn’t stand up at all to any sort of scrutiny or logical thought.


Classic this.

Former SAS chief calls no-deal a ‘major security concern’ as he backs fresh Brexit referendum.

But a bloke on PlanetSwans knows more - and tells the former SAS chief that he is wrong.

Brexit in a nutshell. Bomkers stuff.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

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The Countdown begins. on 14:56 - Aug 29 with 881 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 14:37 - Aug 29 by Kilkennyjack

Classic this.

Former SAS chief calls no-deal a ‘major security concern’ as he backs fresh Brexit referendum.

But a bloke on PlanetSwans knows more - and tells the former SAS chief that he is wrong.

Brexit in a nutshell. Bomkers stuff.


I’m sure he was a fantastic soldier and I have no doubt he could comfortably and easily remove my head from my shoulders from three miles away with a fifty cal, but his argument on this just doesn’t hold up.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
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The Countdown begins. on 15:02 - Aug 29 with 874 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 14:56 - Aug 29 by Highjack

I’m sure he was a fantastic soldier and I have no doubt he could comfortably and easily remove my head from my shoulders from three miles away with a fifty cal, but his argument on this just doesn’t hold up.


Neither does your argument.

The former head of the SAS will have more experience and authority on the subject of intelligence cooperation with other nations than you.
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The Countdown begins. on 15:42 - Aug 29 with 856 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 15:02 - Aug 29 by Batterseajack

Neither does your argument.

The former head of the SAS will have more experience and authority on the subject of intelligence cooperation with other nations than you.


Yet you’re quick to rubbish anyone with any more experience than you who supports brexit, and there’s hell of a lot.
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The Countdown begins. on 15:45 - Aug 29 with 853 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 12:39 - Aug 29 by Jango

It’s not really EU funded though is it. Saying the British government won’t spend on these sort of things if they had the choice is pure speculation and don’t forget the government have to sign off on these things. This below is pure facts.

The UK pays more into the EU budget than it gets back.

In 2016 the UK government paid £13.1 billion to the EU budget, and EU spending on the UK was forecast to be £4.5 billion. So the UK’s ‘net contribution’ was estimated at about £8.6 billion.

Each year the UK gets a discount on its contributions to the EU—the ‘rebate’—worth almost £4 billion last year. Without it the UK would have been liable for £17 billion in contributions.

Being in the EU costs money but does it also create trade, jobs and investment that are worth more?

We can be pretty sure about how much cash we put in, but it’s far harder to be sure about how much, if anything, comes back in economic benefits.


"Being in the EU costs money but does it also create trade, jobs and investment that are worth more?"

Yes. And that's precisely it. Yes we pay to be members of the EU and, in terms of membership fee and rebates and direct grants received back, we contribute more than we get back. But that's only half the story. Leave's message stopped there - there was no appreciation of the benefits of membership; what we actually get for that fee. Knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing springs to mind.

Whether we can replicate or do better than we currently do outside of the EU is then a separate question much more open to debate.
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The Countdown begins. on 15:55 - Aug 29 with 845 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 14:27 - Aug 29 by Batterseajack

Well you've seemingly cherry picked your quote. Its not hard to find out how much our GDP benefits from having barrier free access to the largest economy right on our doorstep.

Rates are set on GDP not growth.
50% growth from £1 is 50p
0.01% growth from £100 is £1


If you don’t like cherry picking here’s the full quote.

The UK doesn’t pay or "send to Brussels" this higher figure of £17 billion, or anything equivalent per week or per day. The rebate is applied straight away (its size is calculated based on the previous year's contributions), so the UK never contributes this much.

The UK’s contributions to the budget vary from year to year. They’ve been larger recently than in previous decades.


And I’m sure these guys have more experience and info on these matters than you.



A membership fee isn’t the same as the economic cost or benefit.

Being in the EU costs money but does it also create trade, jobs and investment that are worth more?

We can be pretty sure about how much cash we put in, but it’s far harder to be sure about how much, if anything, comes back in economic benefits.
[Post edited 29 Aug 15:57]
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The Countdown begins. on 16:22 - Aug 29 with 833 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 15:02 - Aug 29 by Batterseajack

Neither does your argument.

The former head of the SAS will have more experience and authority on the subject of intelligence cooperation with other nations than you.


For all you know I could be the current head of the S.A.S but if I told you I’d have to kill you.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
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The Countdown begins. on 16:27 - Aug 29 with 831 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 16:22 - Aug 29 by Highjack

For all you know I could be the current head of the S.A.S but if I told you I’d have to kill you.


Swansea Asparagus Society?
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The Countdown begins. on 18:55 - Aug 29 with 784 viewsjohnlangy

Our good friend Mr Barnier says the EU is going to give the UK a special deal.

Fantastic news pikey. What do you think ?
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The Countdown begins. on 20:21 - Aug 29 with 739 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 18:55 - Aug 29 by johnlangy

Our good friend Mr Barnier says the EU is going to give the UK a special deal.

Fantastic news pikey. What do you think ?


The EU are finally coming to terms with the fact we’re leaving and are starting to fold. If only the remainers would do the same.
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The Countdown begins. on 23:33 - Aug 29 with 704 viewsthe_oracle

The Countdown begins. on 20:21 - Aug 29 by Jango

The EU are finally coming to terms with the fact we’re leaving and are starting to fold. If only the remainers would do the same.


Folding on the pillars? No.
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The Countdown begins. on 08:05 - Aug 30 with 659 viewsCatullus

I've just read the story on Skynews. Barnier says "We are prepared to offer Britain a deal such as there has never been with any other third country" and to give us increased optimism we have Emmanuel Macron saying he will uese an EU summit next month to put pressure on EU leaders to push for a partnership with Britain. A diplomatic source quoted in the Times said "He sees a no-deal scenario as something that would break links and poison relations at a time when Europe needs to be united beyond the EU" and that is common sense prevailing.
This isn't just about us and them, this isn't just about trade. We only want a fair deal, we don't want better terms than the EU gives it's members and there is more riding on it than the EU and UK. Europe has become unstable again, I would argue much of the instability is down to EU policy. It must have unsettled many (specially Merkel) to see far right protestors marching in their thousands and attacking "foreigners" in a German city. Then there's Russia, they are undoubtedly playing games, dangerous games. We can't forget Trump either, he's a real loose cannon, he's managed some good but what will his overarching effect be?
Of course Macron could just be trying to grab more influence, Merkel is weakened and Macron might fancy his chances of being Europe's No1 elected leader and is cosying up to the UK just for that, politicians are chancers extraordinaire.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
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The Countdown begins. on 08:26 - Aug 30 with 652 viewsShaky

Labour rattled by growing threat of ‘centrist’ schism
Senior figures around Jeremy Corbyn have started gaming when split might occur
By Jim Pickard in London

FT, 29 Aug 2018

Labour is becoming increasingly alarmed about the potential for a breakaway “centrist” party in the coming months as moderate MPs chafe under the leftwing leadership of Jeremy Corbyn.

The idea of an “SDP mark 2” has been discussed ever since Mr Corbyn became leader of the UK opposition in 2015. The former backbencher has views considerably to the left of most of the Parliamentary Labour party.

Only now, however, do senior figures around Mr Corbyn believe that the threat of a schism could be imminent.

Some are already gaming when the split might occur and how much damage it would inflict. Others are taking seriously rumours that a new Europhile centrist party could be launched straight after Brexit — on April 1 next year — in order to campaign for the UK to rejoin the EU.

John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, voiced those fears earlier this month when he warned that it would be “appalling cynicism” if moderate MPs used the summer row over anti-Semitism to start a new party.

The angst about the Corbyn leadership has seen some old enemies burying the hatchet: Tom Watson, the deputy leader, was among a group of MPs to attend a barbecue at the home of Peter Mandelson on July 24. The two were, for years, on opposite sides of the old Tony Blair-Gordon Brown divide: Mr Watson was a consigliere to Mr Brown while Lord Mandelson was an original “Blairite”.

The July discussion focused on Brexit rather than the leadership, the Sunday Times reported, although attendees did not deny that the idea of a new party was raised.

Many Labour MPs are still loath to even consider quitting the party, given the legacy of the Social Democratic party — set up in 1983. The left blamed the departure of moderates such as Shirley Williams, David Owen and Roy Jenkins for keeping Labour out of power until 1997.

But some believe the party may have irreversibly changed since a flood of new, more radical, members entered since 2015. While some can live with Mr Corbyn’s domestic policy — which includes nationalisations, and more tax and spending — they are uncomfortable with his foreign policy.

Alan Johnson, a high-profile cabinet minister under both Mr Blair and Mr Brown, said last week: “A split in the Labour party is now inevitable.”

Even some Corbyn supporters have been frustrated by the way that the leader’s anti-Israel sentiment — he is a longstanding campaigner for Palestinian rights — has dominated the news agenda this summer.

The row about anti-Semitism peaked earlier this month after the revelation that Mr Corbyn laid a wreath in Tunisia at the grave of Palestine Liberation Organization figures blamed for the murder of 11 members of the Israeli Olympics team at the Munich 1972 Olympics.

That has prompted a row within the Labour leadership, with various senior figures urging Mr Corbyn, largely unsuccessfully, to close down the row.
Those “pragmatists” include Mr McDonnell; Andrew Fisher, head of policy; Jon Lansman, chair of the pro-Corbyn group Momentum; and Andrew Murray, a senior Unite figure who advises the leader.

But Mr Corbyn, backed by his chief of staff Karie Murphy, believes that he has nothing to apologise for and has refused to back down.

“There is a view among pragmatic colleagues that the best thing to do is just to end this and get back to discussing what a Labour government would do in power, they see this as a distraction,” said one insider.

Mr McDonnell has said publicly that senior figures are trying to resolve the stand-off. “For anybody to use the issue of anti-Semitism as a cover for launching a new political party they had been planning for nearly two years would rightly be seen as an act of appalling cynicism, basely exploiting a genuine concern that people of goodwill are working hard to address,” he said recently in a tweet.

Discomfort among Labour MPs extends much further than the anti-Semitism row, however. Many believe that Mr Corbyn’s Trotskyite-rooted politics are alien to the party’s history of social democracy.

The leadership now has a choice: do they continue to drive out the centre-left tradition from Labour or begin to respect different views
Chris Leslie, former shadow chancellor

Ever since the failed coup of 2016, Mr Corbyn’s team has been braced for departures. So far, however, only a handful of MPs have quit, for example Tristram Hunt and Jamie Reed — and almost all have left politics entirely.

One exception is John Woodcock, a longstanding critic of Mr Corbyn, who recently left the party to become an independent MP. Last week it was reported that Mike Gapes, a veteran MP, told colleagues on a WhatsApp group: “It is over for me. All that remains is the timing of my announcement.”

One centrist MP said there were regular discussions about forming a splinter party but the conversations were vague: “It’s total rubbish,” the MP said of the reports of a breakaway. “I think they are trying to define this before any of us have even decided what to do.”

Yet staying put may not be an option. Leftwingers are clamouring for greater powers of deselection in order to rebuild the party in Mr Corbyn’s image ahead of the next general election.

Momentum is pushing for the deselection issue to be debated at next month’s party conference.

The issue of Brexit has given moderate MPs a core issue to define themselves against the leadership, given Mr Corbyn’s refusal to endorse a second referendum — when most of the membership would like to try to reverse Brexit.

Chris Leslie, a former shadow chancellor, said there was an “undeniable” crisis within the party over anti-Semitism and Mr Corbyn’s failure to “take the fight” to hard Brexiters. He said that some Corbynistas had tried to smear Europhile backbenchers who were willing to work on cross-party lines by calling it “the beginnings of a new party”.

“The leadership now has a choice: do they continue to drive out the centre-left tradition from Labour or begin to respect different views,” he said.

Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 08:44 - Aug 30 with 642 viewsCatullus

Yesterday Tim (nice but dim) Farron was urging Labour and Tory remain supporting MP's to split off and form a new party. However, he said the Liberals would support it but not join it....so he wants others to do as he says but not as he'd do.
Politics is in a right mess and has been so for a long while. When politicians stopped representing their constituents views and started being careerist, that was it, the road to disaster.
Take Brexit, if we had stronger, better politicians would the EU be where it is now? If politicians hadn't lied cheated and stolen, would they have more respect, more belief from the voters who maybe wouldn't have voted leave.
Choosing leave wasn't just about the EU in my opinion. Ignoring the ususal diatribes about racism and xenophobia, I do think there was a protest vote going on about politics itself, people are, as Gove put it, fed up of experts and to many it's politicians who are the experts we've had enough of.
Every day almost, we have politicians from the same party spouting different views. Hammond getting slapped down by May, Johnson spouting off then we have Umunnaand Starmer pushing different ideas to Corbyn. If the country is fractured it just represents the political scene which is like a mirror hit by a brick, loads of fractures with a hole in the middle.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

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The Countdown begins. on 09:02 - Aug 30 with 637 viewsPegojack

Panasonic becomes the latest multinational to announce it is moving its European HQ from London to the Netherlands over Brexit concerns.

Only 211 days to go before economic disaster, boys! YEAAAAAH!!!

[Post edited 30 Aug 9:13]
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The Countdown begins. on 09:17 - Aug 30 with 630 viewspikeypaul

Another glorious day closer to the great day and yes more project fear muppets crying about what the country has decided democratically to happen.

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The Countdown begins. on 09:25 - Aug 30 with 628 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 09:02 - Aug 30 by Pegojack

Panasonic becomes the latest multinational to announce it is moving its European HQ from London to the Netherlands over Brexit concerns.

Only 211 days to go before economic disaster, boys! YEAAAAAH!!!

[Post edited 30 Aug 9:13]


Upto 20 people could be affected.
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The Countdown begins. on 10:22 - Aug 30 with 602 viewspikeypaul

It's as if no company relocated before the people of the U.K. Kicked the EU into touch and decided to leave.

All these companies do now is use Brexit as anuseful excuse.

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 10:22 - Aug 30 with 602 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 08:44 - Aug 30 by Catullus

Yesterday Tim (nice but dim) Farron was urging Labour and Tory remain supporting MP's to split off and form a new party. However, he said the Liberals would support it but not join it....so he wants others to do as he says but not as he'd do.
Politics is in a right mess and has been so for a long while. When politicians stopped representing their constituents views and started being careerist, that was it, the road to disaster.
Take Brexit, if we had stronger, better politicians would the EU be where it is now? If politicians hadn't lied cheated and stolen, would they have more respect, more belief from the voters who maybe wouldn't have voted leave.
Choosing leave wasn't just about the EU in my opinion. Ignoring the ususal diatribes about racism and xenophobia, I do think there was a protest vote going on about politics itself, people are, as Gove put it, fed up of experts and to many it's politicians who are the experts we've had enough of.
Every day almost, we have politicians from the same party spouting different views. Hammond getting slapped down by May, Johnson spouting off then we have Umunnaand Starmer pushing different ideas to Corbyn. If the country is fractured it just represents the political scene which is like a mirror hit by a brick, loads of fractures with a hole in the middle.


"Choosing leave wasn't just about the EU in my opinion". It was hardly about the EU at all. It was very obviously a protest vote in general which is why the poorer areas tended to have a higher leave vote. Prior to the campaigns many will have had awareness of how the EU affected their lives (or not).
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The Countdown begins. on 10:25 - Aug 30 with 601 viewsShaky

The Countdown begins. on 09:25 - Aug 30 by Jango

Upto 20 people could be affected.


Scoffing at the announced level of jobs affected in this instance puts you fully on par with Pike's level of glib ignorance.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Corporate Japan despairs at UK’s lack of clarity over Brexit
Head of powerful business lobby warns a no-deal exit would be ‘disastrous’
By Robin Harding and Leo Lewis in Tokyo

Financial Times, August 28, 2018

Japanese companies are increasingly frustrated by the double talk from the British government over Brexit and are hamstrung on how to respond, according to the head of Japan’s most powerful business lobby.

“We just can’t do anything. Everyone is seriously concerned,” said Hiroaki Nakanishi, chairman of Keidanren, in an interview with the Financial Times. “Various scenarios get discussed, from no Brexit to plunging into Brexit without any kind of deal at all. We’re now in a situation where we have to consider what to do in all of them,” he said.

His comments highlight the sense of despair among Britain’s biggest foreign employers after waiting more than two years for clarity about what Brexit will mean.

Keidanren represents more than a thousand of Japan’s biggest companies including large investors in the UK such as Toyota, Honda and Nissan. Mr Nakanishi, who took over as chairman in May, also chairs Hitachi and is one of the country’s best-known industrialists.

Mr Nakanishi said a no-deal Brexit would be disastrous and urged Britain to stay in the customs union.

Mr Nakanishi added that the British government has not acted on requests in a 15-page memo from the Japanese government in September 2016 and British ministers do not speak to him with one voice. “When you talk to the UK government, they say something a bit different depending on who is speaking.”

He called for clarity by March next year. “Please keep the current economic environment as much as possible, including the customs union,” Mr Nakanishi said. “If you don’t then it will clearly hinder economic activity in the UK,” he warned.

Mr Nakanishi said “huge geopolitical risks” including tensions over trade were a concern in what is otherwise a strong environment for Japanese companies.

The imposition of more US tariffs could seriously harm Japan, he said, especially if the Trump administration goes ahead with a threatened levy on cars. Japan is already working with its US customers to highlight the disruption caused by tariffs on items such as speciality steels, widely used in the oil and gas industry.

Beyond that, Keidanren and the Japanese government are trying to address US concerns about a trade imbalance, said Mr Nakanishi, but there are no easy answers to a bilateral deficit. “The demands from the American side change so it’s extremely difficult.”

Fresh US sanctions on Iran have also upset corporate Japan, which was just ramping up its dealings with an important oil supplier and an attractive growth market. Mr Nakanishi said Japan should seek exemptions from the sanctions. “I don’t think we’ll get them but we should certainly ask. Completely isolating a country will have negative effects in all kinds of ways. For Iran, they can only turn to China,” he said.

In the past, trade tensions with the US would have a disastrous effect on corporate investment in Japan, but Mr Nakanishi, who led a widely admired turnround at Hitachi, said a lot has changed.

“For example, 10 or 20 years ago we might be spending $5bn at once on a semiconductor plant,” he said. “That kind of capital investment doesn’t happen so much any more. Now we invest in robotics or on revolutionising our logistics.”

“If we go back to the impact of tariffs, then compared with the old style of capital investment it is far less affected,” he said.

Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 10:35 - Aug 30 with 591 viewspikeypaul

The Countdown begins. on 09:25 - Aug 30 by Jango

Upto 20 people could be affected.


And since the remoaners say a large amount of the 800,000 job vacancies currently on the UK are in that area the upto 20 people will easily find work.

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The Countdown begins. on 10:46 - Aug 30 with 583 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 10:35 - Aug 30 by pikeypaul

And since the remoaners say a large amount of the 800,000 job vacancies currently on the UK are in that area the upto 20 people will easily find work.

211 AFLI

SIURL


So the staff at the former Panasonic HQ should move to Norfolk and Kent to become fruit pickers.
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