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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 1201630 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

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Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

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The Countdown begins. on 09:42 - Dec 12 with 1060 viewssherpajacob

The Countdown begins. on 21:36 - Dec 11 by NeathJack

Or invade and annex Ireland.


'Bojo is currently practicing the very words of his idol Churchill regarding Ireland.

During withdrawal negotiations we " never laid a violent hand upon them, which at times would have been quite easy and quite natural"

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The Countdown begins. on 09:42 - Dec 12 with 1056 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 09:41 - Dec 12 by Shaky

People voted for slogans like take back control.

Happily events have now demonstrated that parliament was always in control and the fearmongering was bollocks.

Many other referendum promises collapsed on day 1 like the £350m/week for the NHS.

Time for the charlatans and morons who made those false claims to crawl back under their rocks, and for the hardcore Europhobes to once more be consigned to the fringe loony segment of the political spectrum.
[Post edited 12 Dec 2018 9:42]


Amen, brother.
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The Countdown begins. on 09:49 - Dec 12 with 1050 viewsShaky

The Countdown begins. on 09:42 - Dec 12 by WarwickHunt

Amen, brother.



Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 09:50 - Dec 12 with 1048 viewsShaky


Misology -- It's a bitch
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Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 09:58 - Dec 12 with 1035 viewsShaky

Last Tweet from me. Promise. (geddit Jango?)


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The Countdown begins. on 10:02 - Dec 12 with 1022 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 09:58 - Dec 12 by Shaky

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Nick Cohen is a national treasure.
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The Countdown begins. on 10:04 - Dec 12 with 1021 viewsShaky


Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 10:05 - Dec 12 with 1017 viewsWarwickHunt

Great comment in The Guardian after John Crace’s latest caustic piece -

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/dec/11/theresa-may-struggles-with-free

“Perhaps May wanted to keep the benefits of staying in her car while also attempting to leave it“
[Post edited 12 Dec 2018 10:17]
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The Countdown begins. on 11:28 - Dec 12 with 945 viewssherpajacob

apologies for the shaky style paste

David Davis has today spelt out the deal he would have agreed if he'd been in charge of negotiations. He seems to think the £39bn is payment for May's deal and not payment for commitments previously agreed.

"With will and determination, we can reset Brexit, and keep the promises made to the British people

David Davis


The best end position will be a Canada-style free trade arrangement. I’m confident we can get there, and it has been clear for some time that the EU is prepared to offer us such a deal.

But the Government’s tactics have run us up against the wire, so it is also time to plan for a managed “no deal” exit. “No deal” is actually a misnomer; we will depart on World Trade terms.

Given the time wasted by the Government’s needless machinations and procrastination, we have to quickly get ourselves back on track to pivot towards a Canada-style deal.

In the interim, a World Trade Organisation Deal will enable the UK, freed from the EU, to strike free trade agreements around the world.

The 28 countries of the European Union have a combined GDP of €15.5 trillion. The combined GDP of Australia, New Zealand, India, China, the United States, Singapore and Japan was $40.9 trillion. All these countries are on record as saying they want trade deals with the UK. Under the Prime Minister’s plan, the UK cannot freely agree trade deals even with our number one trading partner, the US.

A World Trade Deal would consign the notion of a backstop to history, so the integrity of the UK will be upheld. No part of the UK will be subject to EU rule as part of the Customs Union.

Significantly, it will give us control of our laws, because there will be an end to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice and Britain will regain sovereignty. Future UK law would be devised in Westminster, not Brussels.

Rather than putting £39 billion into the EU budget, the UK can focus on financing important domestic issues, because an exit on World Trade terms will deliver us control over our money. "

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The Countdown begins. on 11:33 - Dec 12 with 935 viewsGreatBritton

Please look up the Andy Serkis sketch 'LEAKED: Footage From Inside No 10 Downing Street!'
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The Countdown begins. on 12:00 - Dec 12 with 926 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 11:28 - Dec 12 by sherpajacob

apologies for the shaky style paste

David Davis has today spelt out the deal he would have agreed if he'd been in charge of negotiations. He seems to think the £39bn is payment for May's deal and not payment for commitments previously agreed.

"With will and determination, we can reset Brexit, and keep the promises made to the British people

David Davis


The best end position will be a Canada-style free trade arrangement. I’m confident we can get there, and it has been clear for some time that the EU is prepared to offer us such a deal.

But the Government’s tactics have run us up against the wire, so it is also time to plan for a managed “no deal” exit. “No deal” is actually a misnomer; we will depart on World Trade terms.

Given the time wasted by the Government’s needless machinations and procrastination, we have to quickly get ourselves back on track to pivot towards a Canada-style deal.

In the interim, a World Trade Organisation Deal will enable the UK, freed from the EU, to strike free trade agreements around the world.

The 28 countries of the European Union have a combined GDP of €15.5 trillion. The combined GDP of Australia, New Zealand, India, China, the United States, Singapore and Japan was $40.9 trillion. All these countries are on record as saying they want trade deals with the UK. Under the Prime Minister’s plan, the UK cannot freely agree trade deals even with our number one trading partner, the US.

A World Trade Deal would consign the notion of a backstop to history, so the integrity of the UK will be upheld. No part of the UK will be subject to EU rule as part of the Customs Union.

Significantly, it will give us control of our laws, because there will be an end to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice and Britain will regain sovereignty. Future UK law would be devised in Westminster, not Brussels.

Rather than putting £39 billion into the EU budget, the UK can focus on financing important domestic issues, because an exit on World Trade terms will deliver us control over our money. "


He hasn't written himself a very good reference there has he?
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The Countdown begins. on 12:04 - Dec 12 with 921 viewssherpajacob

The Countdown begins. on 12:00 - Dec 12 by LeonWasGod

He hasn't written himself a very good reference there has he?


its akin to asking David Moyes what his solution would be to Jose's current difficulties.

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The Countdown begins. on 12:36 - Dec 12 with 893 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 11:28 - Dec 12 by sherpajacob

apologies for the shaky style paste

David Davis has today spelt out the deal he would have agreed if he'd been in charge of negotiations. He seems to think the £39bn is payment for May's deal and not payment for commitments previously agreed.

"With will and determination, we can reset Brexit, and keep the promises made to the British people

David Davis


The best end position will be a Canada-style free trade arrangement. I’m confident we can get there, and it has been clear for some time that the EU is prepared to offer us such a deal.

But the Government’s tactics have run us up against the wire, so it is also time to plan for a managed “no deal” exit. “No deal” is actually a misnomer; we will depart on World Trade terms.

Given the time wasted by the Government’s needless machinations and procrastination, we have to quickly get ourselves back on track to pivot towards a Canada-style deal.

In the interim, a World Trade Organisation Deal will enable the UK, freed from the EU, to strike free trade agreements around the world.

The 28 countries of the European Union have a combined GDP of €15.5 trillion. The combined GDP of Australia, New Zealand, India, China, the United States, Singapore and Japan was $40.9 trillion. All these countries are on record as saying they want trade deals with the UK. Under the Prime Minister’s plan, the UK cannot freely agree trade deals even with our number one trading partner, the US.

A World Trade Deal would consign the notion of a backstop to history, so the integrity of the UK will be upheld. No part of the UK will be subject to EU rule as part of the Customs Union.

Significantly, it will give us control of our laws, because there will be an end to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice and Britain will regain sovereignty. Future UK law would be devised in Westminster, not Brussels.

Rather than putting £39 billion into the EU budget, the UK can focus on financing important domestic issues, because an exit on World Trade terms will deliver us control over our money. "


He’s staggeringly, spectacularly, breathtakingly fûcking dim.

The next PM? 😂😂😂
[Post edited 12 Dec 2018 12:37]
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The Countdown begins. on 12:41 - Dec 12 with 885 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 09:41 - Dec 12 by Shaky

People voted for slogans like take back control.

Happily events have now demonstrated that parliament was always in control and the fearmongering was bollocks.

Many other referendum promises collapsed on day 1 like the £350m/week for the NHS.

Time for the charlatans and morons who made those false claims to crawl back under their rocks, and for the hardcore Europhobes to once more be consigned to the fringe loony segment of the political spectrum.
[Post edited 12 Dec 2018 9:42]


People voted remain on the basis that they didn’t want a world war 3 or another immediate recession.
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The Countdown begins. on 12:47 - Dec 12 with 875 viewspikeypaul

Or immediate emergency budget,30% drop in house prices,mass unemployment et,etc,etc.

Fecking muppets the lot of them

107 AFLI

SIUYRL

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Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

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The Countdown begins. on 13:03 - Dec 12 with 855 viewsA_Fans_Dad

The Countdown begins. on 12:41 - Dec 12 by Jango

People voted remain on the basis that they didn’t want a world war 3 or another immediate recession.


You missed a few there.
Dramatic Unemployment increase (3million would lose their jobs)
Tax Rises
Spending cuts
No EU Army
Companies leaving the UK in droves
Cameron said he wouldn't resign if Leave won
University Funding would disappear
Western political civilisation would be destroyed
And of course we would be at the back of the Queue
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The Countdown begins. on 13:18 - Dec 12 with 843 viewsEbo

The Countdown begins. on 13:03 - Dec 12 by A_Fans_Dad

You missed a few there.
Dramatic Unemployment increase (3million would lose their jobs)
Tax Rises
Spending cuts
No EU Army
Companies leaving the UK in droves
Cameron said he wouldn't resign if Leave won
University Funding would disappear
Western political civilisation would be destroyed
And of course we would be at the back of the Queue


Because we haven't left yet you dripping f ucking whelk.

Thank you, goodnight and bollocks
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The Countdown begins. on 13:40 - Dec 12 with 825 viewssherpajacob

The Countdown begins. on 13:03 - Dec 12 by A_Fans_Dad

You missed a few there.
Dramatic Unemployment increase (3million would lose their jobs)
Tax Rises
Spending cuts
No EU Army
Companies leaving the UK in droves
Cameron said he wouldn't resign if Leave won
University Funding would disappear
Western political civilisation would be destroyed
And of course we would be at the back of the Queue


both sides lied.

if both finalists in the Olympic boxing fail drugs tests , they don't let the winner keep the gold medal because the runner up cheated as well.


the argument "remain lied as well" is legally and morally bankrupt. it makes the result even less valid, not more.

Those that can't see this are the real danger to democracy.

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The Countdown begins. on 13:49 - Dec 12 with 816 viewsShaky

Strong and stable government:


Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 13:57 - Dec 12 with 804 viewsShaky

The Countdown begins. on 10:02 - Dec 12 by WarwickHunt

Nick Cohen is a national treasure.


And the prophet laureate!

We don’t know where Brexiteers are going now. And neither do they
By Nick Cohen

Spectator, 9 July 2018

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/07/we-dont-know-where-brexiteers-are-going-no

Misology -- It's a bitch
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The Countdown begins. on 14:17 - Dec 12 with 791 viewsShaky

A no-deal Brexit looks likelier by the day
By Daniel Finkelstein

The Times, December 11 2018, 5:00pm, The Times

Even if the PM won the meaningful vote, without Labour support she has no hope of passing the EU withdrawal bill
In case you feel that the future path of Brexit is insufficiently complicated, allow me to introduce you to . . . the Houghton compromise.

On October 28, 1971, Roy Jenkins, deputy leader of the Labour Party, had dinner with his wife in Lockets restaurant and then walked around the corner to the House of Commons and cast a vote against his own party’s three-line whip.

Accompanying him, as he strode through the division lobby, was Douglas Houghton, chairman of the Parliamentary Labour Party. And 67 other Labour MPs followed their example. The rebels were supporting Ted Heath’s motion and providing support, in principle, for membership of the European Common Market.

Mr Heath had allowed his own MPs a free vote and 33 of them had voted against him. It was Jenkins’s rebellion that had seen the Conservative prime minister home. But now the Labour MPs faced a problem.

In order for Britain to join the Common Market, it wasn’t enough to agree the principle. Parliament would have to pass a bill. And, if they were to be consistent, this presented the 69 with the prospect of having to vote with the government again and again. This was simply too much for them to contemplate. The party, in particular constituency parties, was already angry enough, accusing the rebels of propping up a Tory government and calling for both Jenkins and Houghton to resign.

In response to this fury, Houghton proposed a compromise. His vote on the principle would be his only one against the party line. If the government wanted to pass legislation, he argued, it had to rely on its own majority. The day after his rebellious vote, Jenkins announced that he accepted the Houghton compromise.

It was agonising for him, because it threatened the principle of common market membership. Heath came very close to losing on the second reading (the main vote on the thrust of the bill) even after declaring it a vote of confidence (he was bailed out by the Liberals). But Jenkins and Houghton really had no choice because of party politics.

If you understand the Houghton compromise, and the reasons for it, you will appreciate that however bad the prospects look for a Brexit deal, the reality is even worse.

To complete the withdrawal agreement process, it is not enough for the government to get parliament to approve the so-called “meaningful vote” on the principle of the deal. It must also pass, through every stage and through both houses, a withdrawal agreement bill. Such legislation is not only necessary to ensure parliament has the powers to implement the agreement, but is also formally required for the withdrawal agreement to be ratified. No bill, no deal.

Now consider what this means. Whatever “clarifications” and “assurances” Theresa May might get from other European leaders in the next few days, they will not be enough for her to win the meaningful vote without some Labour backing. She must know this. Her aim is surely to reduce the rebellion on her own side so that that the support of a modest number of Labour rebels will be enough for her to get the deal over the line.

That’s where the Houghton compromise becomes an issue. While some Labour rebels might vote with her on the principle to avoid chaos, and while it is just about feasible to imagine that being enough (although the leap of imagination is great), the principle is only the beginning, not the end.

If Mrs May’s deal passed the first stage of the meaningful vote, parliament would then have to consider a bill with dozens of amendments. To ratify the withdrawal agreement, Labour rebels would therefore have to defy three-line whips over and over again, while constantly under pressure from their national and local party. The same considerations that led Houghton to resume voting against the Conservative government in 1971 would apply to Labour rebels now. It is hard to see them reaching a different conclusion.

At a minimum, the withdrawal agreement bill will have to include proposals that cover citizens’ rights, the transition period, and the payment of the so-called divorce bill. It might also cover the administration of the border with Ireland. In other words, night after night, the government would face huge defections on its own side and be relying on Labour votes that probably won’t be forthcoming.

And this is assuming they manage to patch together a rickety coalition big enough to win the meaningful vote in the first place. A heroic assumption.

Oh, and I nearly forgot another thing. These are only the requirements for Britain to pass the deal. The EU has its own procedures. Most important is that its parliament has to give assent. And it has always said that it could take three months to do that. At the very least this is an extra complication.

Taken together, all this makes it hard to see how the government can get ratification for its withdrawal agreement without the solid and timely support of Labour’s front bench. The government simply needs a proper reliable majority to get the bill through and only official opposition support can provide that.

Yet obviously that support won’t be forthcoming without major changes to the agreement — a permanent customs union, for instance, or a second referendum — that Labour would regard as acceptable. One difficulty is that it is not clear what those changes might be. Labour itself doesn’t know what it is prepared to accept and, even if it did, has little incentive to tell anyone else. It is quite possible that it will decide only when it is too late to act.

I strongly suspect that, if he ever backs one at all, Jeremy Corbyn would like to put off supporting a second referendum just long enough that he can take credit for supporting the principle, without there being time left to actually do it.
Another difficulty is that such changes might deprive the deal of any remaining Tory support, making the government’s almost impossible position completely impossible.

There is a widespread view that the chance of having no deal is pretty low because such an outcome would be calamitous and, anyway, there is no majority for it. It’s surely too stupid a thing to allow actually to happen?

That view is wrong. It is incredibly complacent. Mrs May has returned with the only deal we are going to be offered and parliament won’t pass it. This by itself means that the chances of no deal are very high indeed. Looked at another way, the things we have to do now to secure a deal are looking forbiddingly difficult.

What a disaster. What a disgrace.

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The Countdown begins. on 14:37 - Dec 12 with 771 viewsHighjack

It’s a true constitutional crisis.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
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The Countdown begins. on 14:37 - Dec 12 with 771 viewssherpajacob

The Countdown begins. on 13:49 - Dec 12 by Shaky

Strong and stable government:



gone to fill in his Irish passport application.

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The Countdown begins. on 14:38 - Dec 12 with 762 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 13:40 - Dec 12 by sherpajacob

both sides lied.

if both finalists in the Olympic boxing fail drugs tests , they don't let the winner keep the gold medal because the runner up cheated as well.


the argument "remain lied as well" is legally and morally bankrupt. it makes the result even less valid, not more.

Those that can't see this are the real danger to democracy.


Yes and I’m sure you’d be pleased to see another referendum had the vote gone the other way. People are lied to every general election, you don’t see them voiding the vote everytime though.
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