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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 943972 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 11:39 - Aug 11 with 360 viewsWingstandwood

Commemorative and historically significant 50p to be made to celebrate Brexit, could Brexit be finally on its way after all this time?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-49308970
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(No subject) (n/t) on 11:43 - Aug 11 with 349 viewschad

(No subject) (n/t) on 11:35 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

This is where we enter wacky territory, Jang. If MPs were so dead set on ignoring the referendum that they were intent on voting down any withdrawal agreement why would they have voted to give the government the power to invoke A50? The easiest way to frustrate the referendum result was to not allow the government to do that.


Think the answer to that would be fairly obvious
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 11:52 - Aug 11 with 337 viewsPawelAbbott

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:15 - Aug 10 by PawelAbbott

This "we survived pre-1973" argument makes me laugh.
We still had an empire pre-1973, China was a 3rd world country. Eastern Europe was under the control of the Soviet Union. The world was an entirely different place in terms of competing on a global scale pre-1973.
We are the only country in the world sending ourselves back to that period as if it was our glory days.

We did great in the 1800s, maybe if we all go back to watermills and horse and cart things will be even better.
[Post edited 10 Aug 8:21]


I thought it would be interesting to see which other countries trade entirely on WTO trade rules.
The most powerful nation that deals in this way is the mighty Mauritania. A country where 17% of the population are listed as slaves.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 11:58 - Aug 11 with 326 viewsJango

(No subject) (n/t) on 11:15 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

Honest answer. So as a confirmed brexiter you’d be responsible for the fact that the UK is still in the EU.

Why would you have voted against it?


I’d absolutely be taking responsibility for it, anyone voting against it has to shoulder some.

I think the deal falls short of what could be a good deal, the fact that all 27 states have a veto on whether we can leave or not is alarming, and it has to be unanimous. It’s never gonna end well. I still think there’ll be a deal agreed anyway.

On the other hand, if I was remain MP I’d be coming out and apologising for the mess we’re in, admitting playing a massive part in what’s gone on over the last few years and gonna do everything I could to make amends. The uncertainty over the next few months would be bad but it’s a means to an end.

I haven’t seen one remain MP do this and all they’ve done is blame brexiteers and cause more division and hatred.

There’s been talk of a people’s vote for 3 years. It’s been a big debate amongst the public where leave voters have argued that the result won’t be honoured again and remain voters have argued that it’s a chance to have a say now we know more. Now Party leaders of Lib Dem’s and greens are saying they wouldn’t honour result of leave won again. These people can’t be trusted any more than Boris or Farage. F**k me Chukka is in his 3rd party in 3 months.

An analysis by the Guardian and the environmental group Friends of the Earth identified 48 parliamentarians who claimed £5.7m in farming subsidies under the EU’s common agricultural policy (CAP) in 2017, the latest year for which figures are available.

Here’s just one example of why these MPs have their own agendas and we are just minions.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:12 - Aug 11 with 310 viewsJango

(No subject) (n/t) on 11:35 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

This is where we enter wacky territory, Jang. If MPs were so dead set on ignoring the referendum that they were intent on voting down any withdrawal agreement why would they have voted to give the government the power to invoke A50? The easiest way to frustrate the referendum result was to not allow the government to do that.


Probably the same reason why they started campaigning for an election a month later promising to honour the result of the referendum.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:13 - Aug 11 with 306 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 11:43 - Aug 11 by chad

Think the answer to that would be fairly obvious


Enlighten me then, Chadmeister

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:14 - Aug 11 with 305 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:12 - Aug 11 by Jango

Probably the same reason why they started campaigning for an election a month later promising to honour the result of the referendum.


A month later? And you didn’t answer the question.
[Post edited 11 Aug 12:16]

Poll: Tory leader

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 12:24 - Aug 11 with 297 viewsexiledclaseboy

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 11:39 - Aug 11 by Wingstandwood

Commemorative and historically significant 50p to be made to celebrate Brexit, could Brexit be finally on its way after all this time?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-49308970


At least we’ve got a handle on what’s important in all this.

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:31 - Aug 11 with 289 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 11:58 - Aug 11 by Jango

I’d absolutely be taking responsibility for it, anyone voting against it has to shoulder some.

I think the deal falls short of what could be a good deal, the fact that all 27 states have a veto on whether we can leave or not is alarming, and it has to be unanimous. It’s never gonna end well. I still think there’ll be a deal agreed anyway.

On the other hand, if I was remain MP I’d be coming out and apologising for the mess we’re in, admitting playing a massive part in what’s gone on over the last few years and gonna do everything I could to make amends. The uncertainty over the next few months would be bad but it’s a means to an end.

I haven’t seen one remain MP do this and all they’ve done is blame brexiteers and cause more division and hatred.

There’s been talk of a people’s vote for 3 years. It’s been a big debate amongst the public where leave voters have argued that the result won’t be honoured again and remain voters have argued that it’s a chance to have a say now we know more. Now Party leaders of Lib Dem’s and greens are saying they wouldn’t honour result of leave won again. These people can’t be trusted any more than Boris or Farage. F**k me Chukka is in his 3rd party in 3 months.

An analysis by the Guardian and the environmental group Friends of the Earth identified 48 parliamentarians who claimed £5.7m in farming subsidies under the EU’s common agricultural policy (CAP) in 2017, the latest year for which figures are available.

Here’s just one example of why these MPs have their own agendas and we are just minions.


How many of those 48 are MPs?

Poll: Tory leader

1
(No subject) (n/t) on 12:33 - Aug 11 with 287 viewschad

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:13 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

Enlighten me then, Chadmeister


Political expediency / what may be seen as more acceptable to make excuses for.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:33 - Aug 11 with 285 viewsJango

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:14 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

A month later? And you didn’t answer the question.
[Post edited 11 Aug 12:16]


The general election was called less than 3 weeks after article 50 was triggered. I think it’s blatantly clear that during that period MPs acted in whatever way necessary to keep their seats, no?
[Post edited 11 Aug 12:34]
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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:40 - Aug 11 with 276 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:33 - Aug 11 by chad

Political expediency / what may be seen as more acceptable to make excuses for.


I don’t understand. What’s expedient about voting to allow the government to begin the process of leaving the EU if you have no intention of voting to allow the UK to leave the EU?

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:43 - Aug 11 with 275 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:33 - Aug 11 by Jango

The general election was called less than 3 weeks after article 50 was triggered. I think it’s blatantly clear that during that period MPs acted in whatever way necessary to keep their seats, no?
[Post edited 11 Aug 12:34]


Ah but the vote to allow the government to invoke A50 happened months earlier. And of course no one at that time or at the time A50 was invoked knew that there was to be an election. The PM had spent a year denying that she was going to call one.

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 12:46 - Aug 11 with 270 viewsJango

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:43 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

Ah but the vote to allow the government to invoke A50 happened months earlier. And of course no one at that time or at the time A50 was invoked knew that there was to be an election. The PM had spent a year denying that she was going to call one.


Did you believe a word that came out of her mouth?
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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:09 - Aug 11 with 254 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:46 - Aug 11 by Jango

Did you believe a word that came out of her mouth?


No but no one can claim foreknowledge with the benefit of hindsight.

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:26 - Aug 11 with 248 viewsJango

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:09 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

No but no one can claim foreknowledge with the benefit of hindsight.


I think the fact May was having to constantly deny there would be a snap election from the very start of her time as PM meant it was very much on most of their minds, especially labour.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:32 - Aug 11 with 244 viewschad

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:40 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

I don’t understand. What’s expedient about voting to allow the government to begin the process of leaving the EU if you have no intention of voting to allow the UK to leave the EU?


It is politically expedient. More acceptable to voters / easier to make excuses for, rather than absolute direct opposition up front.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:41 - Aug 11 with 239 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:32 - Aug 11 by chad

It is politically expedient. More acceptable to voters / easier to make excuses for, rather than absolute direct opposition up front.


Or, alternatively, saying that remainer MPs were always determined not to allow Brexit is pie in the sky and the only reason we’re still in the E.U. is because the withdrawal agreement presented to parliament wasn’t acceptable to either leavers or remainers.
[Post edited 11 Aug 13:45]

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:44 - Aug 11 with 236 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:26 - Aug 11 by Jango

I think the fact May was having to constantly deny there would be a snap election from the very start of her time as PM meant it was very much on most of their minds, especially labour.


I completely disagree. The fact that she called an election was a big surprise to pretty much everyone.

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:12 - Aug 11 with 220 viewsBatterseajack

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:44 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

I completely disagree. The fact that she called an election was a big surprise to pretty much everyone.


Who’d have foreseen a snap general election happening once A50 2 year window was opened. It was madness.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:40 - Aug 11 with 205 viewsJackFish

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:41 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

Or, alternatively, saying that remainer MPs were always determined not to allow Brexit is pie in the sky and the only reason we’re still in the E.U. is because the withdrawal agreement presented to parliament wasn’t acceptable to either leavers or remainers.
[Post edited 11 Aug 13:45]


Is there any withdrawal agreement that can get through parliament? I'm struggling to see one that would get the numbers. You might win more remainer votes by agreeing to stay in the SM and/or CU, but then the MPs who want a hard Brexit will definitely vote against it. Likewise if you somehow presented a harder Brexit there's not the numbers for that either.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:02 - Aug 11 with 168 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 14:40 - Aug 11 by JackFish

Is there any withdrawal agreement that can get through parliament? I'm struggling to see one that would get the numbers. You might win more remainer votes by agreeing to stay in the SM and/or CU, but then the MPs who want a hard Brexit will definitely vote against it. Likewise if you somehow presented a harder Brexit there's not the numbers for that either.


A softer deal including the customs union etc would have flown through parliament.

Poll: Tory leader

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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:09 - Aug 11 with 160 viewsjacks777

(No subject) (n/t) on 16:02 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

A softer deal including the customs union etc would have flown through parliament.


That would mean we haven’t left the Frankenstein project.
Which would be totally unacceptable to millions of Brits.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:18 - Aug 11 with 154 viewsbluey_the_blue

(No subject) (n/t) on 16:02 - Aug 11 by exiledclaseboy

A softer deal including the customs union etc would have flown through parliament.


Yup, leave the EU institution but stay in EU institutions to the extent couldn't negotiate own trade deals.

Do you really believe that would fly?
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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:19 - Aug 11 with 153 viewsmajorraglan

(No subject) (n/t) on 16:09 - Aug 11 by jacks777

That would mean we haven’t left the Frankenstein project.
Which would be totally unacceptable to millions of Brits.


I reckon a Customs Union would have been acceptable to more people than a No Deal Brexit.

When all this started off, the talk was of a deal and leaving on an amicable basis, then suddenly we have the prospect of No Deal which is something I think we can all (well those with some incling of sense) see we are ill-equipped for.

Theres a lot of talk about a trade deal with the States, but striking a tidy deal with them won't be easy, Trump has an "America First" agenda (and I don't blame him putting his own people's needs first) and then there is a very strong pro Ireland agenda/group in the Congress Senate who are already on record as having said they will block any attempt at a deal if it undermines the peace process in NI.
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