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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 1144441 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:54 - Aug 12 with 616 viewssherpajacob

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:17 - Aug 12 by bluey_the_blue

It's pretty obvious there are two sides to negotiations. Also pretty obvious no agreement can be reached, what we could do to leave.


A question for you Humbert,

Now that it's clear the German car industry are not beating down the EU s door demanding a,deal, when will the UK start playing all these trump cards we hold?

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(No subject) (n/t) on 13:59 - Aug 12 with 599 viewsKerouac

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:43 - Aug 12 by sherpajacob

Supply and demand.


You don't even know what your answer meant do you.
Just 3 little words that sounded good popped into your head

Absolutely pitiful.

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 14:07 - Aug 12 with 595 viewsBatterseajack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 13:03 - Aug 12 by Jango

So you get to choose what leave voters knew and they believed? The fact the argument was out there in the public domain meant people knew the EUs views on the matter. You don’t like that but it’s a fact. We voted knowing the EU werent going to make it easy.


So Leavers believed remainers more than they believed leavers. Right-o!
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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:12 - Aug 12 with 582 viewslondonlisa2001

(No subject) (n/t) on 12:49 - Aug 12 by chad

I think replicate Vs retain the benefits are horses of a very different colour

But at the end of the day if an acceptable deal cannot be found sometimes you need to be prepared to press the nuclear button, rather than bend over and take it, as the Trust has learned.


Nonsense.

The two situations have nothing in common.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:24 - Aug 12 with 559 viewslondonlisa2001

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:59 - Aug 12 by Kerouac

You don't even know what your answer meant do you.
Just 3 little words that sounded good popped into your head

Absolutely pitiful.


His answer shows he understands a heck of a lot more about it than you do.

Currencies aren’t fixed against an objective point. They are measured in relation to each other. If people find the Euro more attractive than sterling for whatever reason the price of a Euro will increase compared to the price of sterling. In other words, the Euro will strengthen against sterling - it will take more sterling to purchase Euros.

It’s all about demand. The manipulation of that demand, whether it is deliberate (interest rate setting as one example) or driven by wider economic factors (inflation as one example) or wider political factors (brexit as one example) is a different matter.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:32 - Aug 12 with 553 viewssherpajacob

(No subject) (n/t) on 13:59 - Aug 12 by Kerouac

You don't even know what your answer meant do you.
Just 3 little words that sounded good popped into your head

Absolutely pitiful.


I guess I'm more of a,Keynesian than a Friedman style monetarist, So I don't necessarily follow the view that controlling the supply of broad and narrow money through interest rates and monetary policy is particularly effective. I do have some time for Hayek.

Ultimately under any regime of flexibility and floating exchanges rates, as opposed to historical agreements like Bretton woods, the gold standard or the ERM, the value of a currency relative to other currencies is dependent on Supply and demand.

Your question should have been what are the supply and demand factors currently influencing the relative strength of the Euro.

There are of course many, almost infinite factors, including QE, relative interest rates, expectations of inflation and GDP. and not least political stability..

All of these and others are influencers of supply and demand which drive currency prices up or down.

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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:57 - Aug 12 with 524 viewsWarwickHunt

(No subject) (n/t) on 14:32 - Aug 12 by sherpajacob

I guess I'm more of a,Keynesian than a Friedman style monetarist, So I don't necessarily follow the view that controlling the supply of broad and narrow money through interest rates and monetary policy is particularly effective. I do have some time for Hayek.

Ultimately under any regime of flexibility and floating exchanges rates, as opposed to historical agreements like Bretton woods, the gold standard or the ERM, the value of a currency relative to other currencies is dependent on Supply and demand.

Your question should have been what are the supply and demand factors currently influencing the relative strength of the Euro.

There are of course many, almost infinite factors, including QE, relative interest rates, expectations of inflation and GDP. and not least political stability..

All of these and others are influencers of supply and demand which drive currency prices up or down.


Ooooooooof!
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(No subject) (n/t) on 14:59 - Aug 12 with 523 viewsexiledclaseboy

(No subject) (n/t) on 14:32 - Aug 12 by sherpajacob

I guess I'm more of a,Keynesian than a Friedman style monetarist, So I don't necessarily follow the view that controlling the supply of broad and narrow money through interest rates and monetary policy is particularly effective. I do have some time for Hayek.

Ultimately under any regime of flexibility and floating exchanges rates, as opposed to historical agreements like Bretton woods, the gold standard or the ERM, the value of a currency relative to other currencies is dependent on Supply and demand.

Your question should have been what are the supply and demand factors currently influencing the relative strength of the Euro.

There are of course many, almost infinite factors, including QE, relative interest rates, expectations of inflation and GDP. and not least political stability..

All of these and others are influencers of supply and demand which drive currency prices up or down.


Kerouac


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(No subject) (n/t) on 15:09 - Aug 12 with 500 viewsjacks777

(No subject) (n/t) on 14:24 - Aug 12 by londonlisa2001

His answer shows he understands a heck of a lot more about it than you do.

Currencies aren’t fixed against an objective point. They are measured in relation to each other. If people find the Euro more attractive than sterling for whatever reason the price of a Euro will increase compared to the price of sterling. In other words, the Euro will strengthen against sterling - it will take more sterling to purchase Euros.

It’s all about demand. The manipulation of that demand, whether it is deliberate (interest rate setting as one example) or driven by wider economic factors (inflation as one example) or wider political factors (brexit as one example) is a different matter.


Good a weaker £ isn’t a bad thing at all.
It will make British goods more attractive.
Also a strong € will make their goods less attractive.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 15:17 - Aug 12 with 493 viewslonglostjack

(No subject) (n/t) on 15:09 - Aug 12 by jacks777

Good a weaker £ isn’t a bad thing at all.
It will make British goods more attractive.
Also a strong € will make their goods less attractive.


It’s also good for the environment because it will lead to higher petrol prices. Everyone’s a winner.

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(No subject) (n/t) on 15:57 - Aug 12 with 456 viewsGwyn737

(No subject) (n/t) on 14:32 - Aug 12 by sherpajacob

I guess I'm more of a,Keynesian than a Friedman style monetarist, So I don't necessarily follow the view that controlling the supply of broad and narrow money through interest rates and monetary policy is particularly effective. I do have some time for Hayek.

Ultimately under any regime of flexibility and floating exchanges rates, as opposed to historical agreements like Bretton woods, the gold standard or the ERM, the value of a currency relative to other currencies is dependent on Supply and demand.

Your question should have been what are the supply and demand factors currently influencing the relative strength of the Euro.

There are of course many, almost infinite factors, including QE, relative interest rates, expectations of inflation and GDP. and not least political stability..

All of these and others are influencers of supply and demand which drive currency prices up or down.


🎤 drop!
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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:03 - Aug 12 with 451 viewsBatterseajack

(No subject) (n/t) on 15:17 - Aug 12 by longlostjack

It’s also good for the environment because it will lead to higher petrol prices. Everyone’s a winner.


...and good for the NHS. When food prices go up, everyone eats less and we have fewer fat people with heart problems.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:07 - Aug 12 with 443 viewssherpajacob

(No subject) (n/t) on 15:09 - Aug 12 by jacks777

Good a weaker £ isn’t a bad thing at all.
It will make British goods more attractive.
Also a strong € will make their goods less attractive.


A weak currency is a symptom of a weak economy, not a tool for economic growth. Any short term "benefits" for imports and exports is soon removed by fundamental economics.

A weak £ just moves us further down the economic league table of leading countries. Arguing in favour of a weak currency is like arguing the championship is better than the PL because player wages are lower.

https://investinganswers.com/dictionary/w/weak-currency

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(No subject) (n/t) on 16:15 - Aug 12 with 423 viewsWarwickHunt

(No subject) (n/t) on 16:07 - Aug 12 by sherpajacob

A weak currency is a symptom of a weak economy, not a tool for economic growth. Any short term "benefits" for imports and exports is soon removed by fundamental economics.

A weak £ just moves us further down the economic league table of leading countries. Arguing in favour of a weak currency is like arguing the championship is better than the PL because player wages are lower.

https://investinganswers.com/dictionary/w/weak-currency


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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:12 - Aug 12 with 370 viewsjacks777

(No subject) (n/t) on 16:07 - Aug 12 by sherpajacob

A weak currency is a symptom of a weak economy, not a tool for economic growth. Any short term "benefits" for imports and exports is soon removed by fundamental economics.

A weak £ just moves us further down the economic league table of leading countries. Arguing in favour of a weak currency is like arguing the championship is better than the PL because player wages are lower.

https://investinganswers.com/dictionary/w/weak-currency


Your analogy is nonsense. Firstly just because the pound value goes down doesn’t mean it’s weak.
Currencies go up and down all the time.
Secondly, the IMF even said the the £ was overvalued before the eu referendum, so it’s now probably finding its feet.
Thirdly, devaluation can boosts exports and create jobs.

Large swaths of the eu economy is in a terrible state - Greece, Spain, Portugal, Italy etc.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:21 - Aug 12 with 361 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 14:07 - Aug 12 by Batterseajack

So Leavers believed remainers more than they believed leavers. Right-o!


Is that what I said? Remains argument is that there was no mention of no deal in the lead up to the referendum. It’s utter b***ocks. A common opinion by leave voters in the lead up to the referendum was that the EU would never give us a deal and they’d make an example of us so that no other country would follow. The fact is, the EU themselves told us a deal was by no means guaranteed. The remain campaign argued a deal was by no means guaranteed. Cameron told us if a deal wasn’t reached after 2 years we’d leave on WTO terms. You’re problem is you seem to think remain voters based their decision on knowledge of the situation and leave voters just lapped up everything Farage and Johnson said on the campaign. Again, just an example of remainers sitting on their high horse.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:21 - Aug 12 with 360 viewsPawelAbbott

(No subject) (n/t) on 15:09 - Aug 12 by jacks777

Good a weaker £ isn’t a bad thing at all.
It will make British goods more attractive.
Also a strong € will make their goods less attractive.


Unfortunately Manufacturing only makes up 11% of GDP but still attains 70% of exports. Hence we don't export a great deal in comparison to what we import.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:22 - Aug 12 with 360 viewsGwyn737

(No subject) (n/t) on 17:12 - Aug 12 by jacks777

Your analogy is nonsense. Firstly just because the pound value goes down doesn’t mean it’s weak.
Currencies go up and down all the time.
Secondly, the IMF even said the the £ was overvalued before the eu referendum, so it’s now probably finding its feet.
Thirdly, devaluation can boosts exports and create jobs.

Large swaths of the eu economy is in a terrible state - Greece, Spain, Portugal, Italy etc.


By that logic, Zimbabwe must be smashing it.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:28 - Aug 12 with 349 viewsjacks777

(No subject) (n/t) on 17:22 - Aug 12 by Gwyn737

By that logic, Zimbabwe must be smashing it.


Yes of course comparing Zimbabwe to the UK is a great comparison.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:34 - Aug 12 with 342 viewsjacks777

(No subject) (n/t) on 17:21 - Aug 12 by PawelAbbott

Unfortunately Manufacturing only makes up 11% of GDP but still attains 70% of exports. Hence we don't export a great deal in comparison to what we import.


And that could well change with the £ finding it’s feet, instead of being overvalued as it was previously.
A £ that isn’t overvalued is good news for the exporters of this country, which in turn is good news for jobs in the UK.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:37 - Aug 12 with 341 viewsBatterseajack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:21 - Aug 12 by Jango

Is that what I said? Remains argument is that there was no mention of no deal in the lead up to the referendum. It’s utter b***ocks. A common opinion by leave voters in the lead up to the referendum was that the EU would never give us a deal and they’d make an example of us so that no other country would follow. The fact is, the EU themselves told us a deal was by no means guaranteed. The remain campaign argued a deal was by no means guaranteed. Cameron told us if a deal wasn’t reached after 2 years we’d leave on WTO terms. You’re problem is you seem to think remain voters based their decision on knowledge of the situation and leave voters just lapped up everything Farage and Johnson said on the campaign. Again, just an example of remainers sitting on their high horse.









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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:44 - Aug 12 with 332 viewsjacks777

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:37 - Aug 12 by Batterseajack










Yes what they should also have said was if the PM wasn’t a remoaner.
A Brexit PM from the start would definitely have had a different outcome, to what we have at the moment.

May the 5th columnist....say no more.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:44 - Aug 12 with 332 viewsGwyn737

(No subject) (n/t) on 17:28 - Aug 12 by jacks777

Yes of course comparing Zimbabwe to the UK is a great comparison.


I’m not comparing, more pushing your argument to it’s conclusion.
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:47 - Aug 12 with 323 viewsjacks777

(No subject) (n/t) on 17:44 - Aug 12 by Gwyn737

I’m not comparing, more pushing your argument to it’s conclusion.


So you agree that the UK £ should still be overvalued as it was pre - eu referendum ?
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(No subject) (n/t) on 17:51 - Aug 12 with 316 viewsGwyn737

(No subject) (n/t) on 17:47 - Aug 12 by jacks777

So you agree that the UK £ should still be overvalued as it was pre - eu referendum ?


Nope. Never said that. Not sure where you got that idea from.
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