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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 1128760 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:16 - Sep 26 with 775 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:01 - Sep 26 by WarwickHunt

You’d have trouble keeping up with Benny from Crossroads.


I can keep up with you though. Same predictable shit everyday you boring old tw*t.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:28 - Sep 26 with 752 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:16 - Sep 26 by Jango

I can keep up with you though. Same predictable shit everyday you boring old tw*t.


I could eat alphabet soup and shit more intelligent posts than your drivel.

Imbecile.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:37 - Sep 26 with 737 viewsKilkennyjack




I think point 3 refers.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:43 - Sep 26 with 714 viewssherpajacob

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 19:54 - Sep 26 by Jango

So is he pushing for a no deal or not? I can’t keep up with you?


Johnson says he wants a deal, he also wanted to win the supreme court case, but failed to organise a basic signed witness statement, the absence of which was absolutely fatal to his case, hence the 11-0.

I believe they are displaying the same level of incompetence in their EU negotiations as evidenced by the Luxembourg PM's words regarding the lack of written proposals.

Johnson is finding that an Eton old boys tie will only get you so far if you have no other discernible talents. It will get you the leadership of the Tory party, no problem.

Poll: Your favourite ever Swans shirt sponsor?

3
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:53 - Sep 26 with 701 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:28 - Sep 26 by WarwickHunt

I could eat alphabet soup and shit more intelligent posts than your drivel.

Imbecile.


That’s just it Warwick, you don’t actually come up with anything intelligent. You just call anyone you don’t agree with thick. About time you grew up old timer.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:54 - Sep 26 with 706 viewsladyjack

Boris Johnson needs to apologise to the Queen and resign.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:07 - Sep 26 with 686 viewslondonlisa2001

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 19:54 - Sep 26 by Jango

So is he pushing for a no deal or not? I can’t keep up with you?


??

I’m going to assume you genuinely don’t understand and explain.

The allegation is that a number of Johnson backers have shorted sterling. Simplistically, that means that they have agreed to sell something at a future contract date that they don’t at present own. They hope that the value of sterling falls so that they can then buy the sterling they need before the end of the contract at a cheaper price than they’ve sold it for. They make huge profits. There are.a number of ways they can do this, but it doesn’t much matter for this purpose.

If the UK leaves the EU, sterling will fall in value. The ‘harder’ the brexit, the more it will fall. That’s because the currency markets believe leaving is really, really stupid. It doesn’t matter whether they’re right, that’s what they believe so that’s what will happen.

A no deal is perfect for them. But the most important thing is that we leave before they need to settle the contract. If we stay after that date, they will lose as sterling is likely to increase in value if we are still in the EU on 1 November.

Johnson would prefer to leave with a deal. Because the fall out from no deal would be so hard that he would be incredibly unlikely to remain as PM. But his main aim is that we leave on 31 October. Parliament is attempting to frustrate that if no deal can be found. Speculators believe that Johnson will not, despite his aims, be able to get a deal. Because they don’t believe an alternative to the backstop is possible. Particularly in a few weeks. So they are betting that he won’t get a deal, but will still leave. They are quids in if that happens.

I hope that you take that in the spirit intended. If you don’t, I won’t bother again.
5
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:13 - Sep 26 with 668 viewsladyjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:53 - Sep 26 by Jango

That’s just it Warwick, you don’t actually come up with anything intelligent. You just call anyone you don’t agree with thick. About time you grew up old timer.


Cant disagree with any of that regarding Warwick.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:32 - Sep 26 with 648 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:53 - Sep 26 by Jango

That’s just it Warwick, you don’t actually come up with anything intelligent. You just call anyone you don’t agree with thick. About time you grew up old timer.


You struggle with basic comprehension. Repeatedly.

I admire Clasey and Lisa who struggle manfully to educate dribbling fûckwits like yourself and one or two others.

I’ve given up trying to educate pork.
1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:37 - Sep 26 with 636 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:13 - Sep 26 by ladyjack

Cant disagree with any of that regarding Warwick.


Fûck me - the Aberfûckwit branch of the Brains’ Trust has just woken up.
[Post edited 26 Sep 21:59]
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:50 - Sep 26 with 615 viewslonglostjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 20:43 - Sep 26 by sherpajacob

Johnson says he wants a deal, he also wanted to win the supreme court case, but failed to organise a basic signed witness statement, the absence of which was absolutely fatal to his case, hence the 11-0.

I believe they are displaying the same level of incompetence in their EU negotiations as evidenced by the Luxembourg PM's words regarding the lack of written proposals.

Johnson is finding that an Eton old boys tie will only get you so far if you have no other discernible talents. It will get you the leadership of the Tory party, no problem.


Great post.

Poll: Who is responsible for the Brexit fiasco?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 22:03 - Sep 26 with 579 viewsGwyn737

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 19:21 - Sep 26 by bluey_the_blue

Not at all.

Very few things in the world are black and white. Naive to believe otherwise.


Quite right.

That’s why referendums are a daft way to answer complex questions.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 22:03 - Sep 26 with 576 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:07 - Sep 26 by londonlisa2001

??

I’m going to assume you genuinely don’t understand and explain.

The allegation is that a number of Johnson backers have shorted sterling. Simplistically, that means that they have agreed to sell something at a future contract date that they don’t at present own. They hope that the value of sterling falls so that they can then buy the sterling they need before the end of the contract at a cheaper price than they’ve sold it for. They make huge profits. There are.a number of ways they can do this, but it doesn’t much matter for this purpose.

If the UK leaves the EU, sterling will fall in value. The ‘harder’ the brexit, the more it will fall. That’s because the currency markets believe leaving is really, really stupid. It doesn’t matter whether they’re right, that’s what they believe so that’s what will happen.

A no deal is perfect for them. But the most important thing is that we leave before they need to settle the contract. If we stay after that date, they will lose as sterling is likely to increase in value if we are still in the EU on 1 November.

Johnson would prefer to leave with a deal. Because the fall out from no deal would be so hard that he would be incredibly unlikely to remain as PM. But his main aim is that we leave on 31 October. Parliament is attempting to frustrate that if no deal can be found. Speculators believe that Johnson will not, despite his aims, be able to get a deal. Because they don’t believe an alternative to the backstop is possible. Particularly in a few weeks. So they are betting that he won’t get a deal, but will still leave. They are quids in if that happens.

I hope that you take that in the spirit intended. If you don’t, I won’t bother again.


Thank you.
1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 22:38 - Sep 26 with 531 viewsLuther27

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:32 - Sep 26 by WarwickHunt

You struggle with basic comprehension. Repeatedly.

I admire Clasey and Lisa who struggle manfully to educate dribbling fûckwits like yourself and one or two others.

I’ve given up trying to educate pork.


Order, order
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:19 - Sep 26 with 501 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 21:32 - Sep 26 by WarwickHunt

You struggle with basic comprehension. Repeatedly.

I admire Clasey and Lisa who struggle manfully to educate dribbling fûckwits like yourself and one or two others.

I’ve given up trying to educate pork.


utter humbug.

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:25 - Sep 26 with 493 viewsKilkennyjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:19 - Sep 26 by Kerouac

utter humbug.


Bad word choice.

You should say sorry.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:08 - Sep 27 with 465 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:25 - Sep 26 by Kilkennyjack

Bad word choice.

You should say sorry.


humbug.


[Post edited 27 Sep 0:20]

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:12 - Sep 27 with 331 viewsKerouac

Freddie Wild;
(Freddie Wild is an Equity Analyst working for a major investment bank. He previously worked as a researcher for Sir Bill Cash MP after stints in consultancy and asset management. Freddie has an MSc and MA in Economics from Edinburgh University.)




"Procedure, rather than policy, is dominating political discussion at the moment. At their conference this week, the Labour Party demonstrated more interest in internal divisions (rather than creating an electoral platform), the right of the Government to prorogue Parliament has been brought up for review by the Supreme Court and the Prime Minister has been denied his desired election by the poorly-conceived Fixed-term Parliaments Act. With so much navel-gazing, it is easy to miss the fact that Europe’s economy is once again returning to stagnation and decline, a situation which is perpetuated by its political structure. This month, the European Central Bank (ECB) has substantially cut its forecast for growth in the Eurozone, also lowering the inflation forecast next year from 1.4% to 1.0%. These changes equate to big impacts on European growth and fatally undermine the narrative of recovery being propagated by Brussels. That this is itself a substantial economic failure is of little doubt, given the ECB’s mandate to keep inflation running at a stable 2%. In response, the ECB lowered deposit rates further into negative territory, signalling that interest rates would stay lower for longer than it had previously guided. Most dramatically, they committed to buying €20 billion of bonds every month from November. In Europe, Quantitative Easing is back with a bang. European economic weakness has been a feature of the landscape for nearly a decade – but it has not always been thus. At the turn of the millennium, the European establishment was aggressively pushing its economic model. European banks were expanding their balance sheets to unprecedented levels, seeking to muscle their way to scale in an industry dominated by the big American investment banks and backed by a supportive bureaucracy in Brussels. Corporates were perusing big deals, with overall deal-making over the 5-year period 2003-2007 reaching €5.2 trillion, according to the Institute for Mergers, Acquisitions and Alliances. This was a colossal bet on European influence spreading. Backing this empire-building was an economy reliably ticking over: inflation was stable, growth was steady and the sovereign debt burden (apparently) manageable. Calls grew for us all to follow the new, collaborative economic infrastructure being instituted in the name of ‘ever-closer union’. That Panglossian outlook has since been thoroughly discredited. Following a recession which knocked 4.1% off European GDP in 2009 and sent unemployment in major economies like Spain soaring over 25%, corporate Europe has struggled to recover with any of the verve of its American counterparts. For instance, $1 invested a decade ago in the American S&P 500 would now be worth $3.31 but €1 in the EuroStoxx 50 would be worth just €1.46. Moreover, European banks like Deutsche Bank are retreating, chastened and embarrassed, from the world stage. The corporate ambition has faded, replaced with a survivalist mentality which in 2018 retreated nearly 30% from 2007 highs. Far from validating the economic model, it has lurched from crisis to crisis. What saved the euro during the crisis was not fast-paced action by political leaders, but a vast and unprecedented purchase of sovereign and corporate debt by the ECB. The effect of this was to allow individual countries and companies to issue debt at reasonable prices, surviving the worst of the economic trauma. Without fundamental fiscal reform, by liberalising, decentralising, and generally letting free markets flourish, this debt-buying was more akin to bailing out the boat while leaving the leak unplugged. The lack of true reform has now come full circle, and the EU once again finds itself in the doldrums. Germany, the strong man of Europe, is facing industrial (if not yet actual) recession. Unemployment remains persistently, perniciously high in Spain and the periphery, while France is led by a man more interested in his own vainglorious legacy as a father of European integration than true economic reforms. It is no accident that history is repeating itself now with ECB stimulus. The consensus-driven, procedure-obsessed EU has shown it is unable and unwilling to effect any continent-wide fiscal or regulatory reform, seemingly content to let unelected individuals, such as Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, take the headlines in the absence of meaningful progress. In the UK, the current preoccupation with the mechanics of Brexit will soon once again be replaced with conversations about policy. Our negotiations with the EU over the future economic relationship are likely to take many years to resolve. It is vital that now, with so many politicians and leaders still trying to take us back into the EU’s economic arrangements (either via a customs union or Single Market arrangement or via a revocation of Article 50), we must remember the costs of the EU’s economic failures, and the opportunities that await outside its influence."

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:34 - Sep 27 with 317 viewsbluey_the_blue

Nice video, conveniently recorded of Labour MP Karl Turner aggressively confronting Dominic Cummings BBC have subtitles for all the comments made.

For some strange reason, Turners comment 58 seconds in of "You should be in a ditch, dead" didn't get any subtitling. Funny that.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:49 - Sep 27 with 304 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 19:00 - Sep 22 by londonlisa2001

Yellowhammer was written by the civil service (and experts in each area) under the control of the cabinet office.

Not ‘remain twitter fanatics’.

He ma6 be an expert economist, but believe me, when he says as he does in that article, that yellowhammer is 5 pages long, and is a worst case scenario, he is lying.

You can accept that or not accept it. Your choice.

It’s farcical. You voted brexit because you thought it would be beneficial for the country. Now it’s been shown beyond any reasonable doubt that it is not beneficial to the country, you want brexit because ‘that’s what you wanted before’.


Lord Lilley;
(Peter Lilley is a former Conservative MP, representing St. Albans between 1983 and 1997, and Hitchin and Harpenden between 1997 and 2017. He has held a variety of ministerial and shadow ministerial roles, including serving in the Cabinet between 1990 and 1997 and as Shadow Chancellor and Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party in the late 1990s. He sat on the Exiting the European Union Select Committee between 2016 and 2017. He joined the House of Lords in June 2018.)



"Those campaigning to reverse the EU referendum result talk of the EU as if it is the very basis of British and European prosperity. When viewed against the evidence, such an analysis is simply untenable. A new report from Global Britain, £82bn reasons the EU held back the UK, shows how. Almost every aspect of the EU’s economic performance – not least UK trade with it – has been dismal, underperforming regularly against every corner of the globe – be it advanced or developing nations – for a very long period of time. For many countries across the European continent, EU-induced policy – primarily designed to hold the euro together – has directly led to economic hardship, socially damaging levels of unemployment and a questioning of the very fabric of their societies. The result has been a rise in more radical politics and people leaving their countries of birth to seek better economic opportunity elsewhere. This is the antithesis of what the EU was founded to achieve. The failure of EU economic policy has not only impacted EU nations but also cost the UK £82bn over the twenty years to 2017 due to lost economic opportunity, as weak demand has impacted negatively on UK exports to the Eurozone. To understand the failure of the Eurozone, we need to go back to a time when it did not yet exist. In 1994 the economies of the US and the future Eurozone were of broadly similar size – worth 24.9% and 24.5% of global GDP respectively. Today the US economy is 30% larger than the Eurozone. Simply put, had the Eurozone grown at the same rate as the US, the UK could have expected to have sold £82bn more in exports due to greater economic demand. The unfortunate truth is that EU economic performance has been the global laggard over the short and long term. By comparison, since the financial crisis, the UK economy has outperformed all the major EU economies including Germany. Overall it has grown 19% over that period compared with a 13% rise in the Eurozone. That 6% differential is worth £120bn, or to illustrate what that sum represents, just less than the entire NHS budget. For the British people, the beneficial result of the country’s performance has been more jobs. The UK has materially outperformed the EU in both job creation and reduction of unemployment. UK unemployment is at its lowest level since 1974. French unemployment is 2.5 times the UK level, Spain 4 times and Greece 5 times higher. Since the EU referendum, 750,000 more people are in work in the UK. This contrasts with HM Treasury forecast of 500,000 job losses following a Leave vote – meaning its prediction was an embarrassing 1.2 million out. Despite misplaced criticisms, job growth has been across the board and not just in the ‘gig economy’. More people work in manufacturing, construction, utilities, IT, health, education and the arts sectors than before the referendum. UK wage growth has started to pick up too and is growing in real terms, while the UK’s minimum wage is the second most generous in the EU. The underperformance of the Eurozone can be laid firmly at the EU’s own door. Fundamentally, the Eurozone is not an optimal currency area; it lacks fiscal transfers and is weakly controlled with no central Treasury. The structural weakness and disequilibrium of the euro has led to sub-optimal firefighting policy choices to prop the currency up. The lack of political will and democratic accountability make it near impossible to rectify its flaws. These are structural issues that will not be easily rectified, leading to continuing divergent performance, socially damaging unemployment levels in the south and a loss of competitiveness. The problem is the euro’s construction and there is no easy fix. Underperformance is baked in. Imbalances are growing, not reducing, be they employment levels, migration trends, fiscal strength, competitiveness and Target2 liabilities (intra-country balances). The big myth remains that the Single Market is central to UK prosperity. It is not. Over the last 20 years, UK trade has grown 12 times with China, 3.1 times with the rest of the world ex-EU, 2.6 times with the US and just 2 times with the EU. Moreover, the UK trades with a modest surplus with the world ex-EU but has a £96bn deficit with the EU. Does it not strike you odd that UK trade not only is growing faster where it trades generally under WTO rules rather than within the EU Single Market – and is in surplus, not enduring a huge deficit? EU citizens are voting with their feet. An estimated 3.5 million have moved to the UK over the last 20 years. Economic failure has directly led to widespread migration away from Italy, Spain, Portugal and most of Eastern Europe. People follow the opportunity and it has generally not been in the Eurozone. Again, despite claims, net EU migration has remained positive to the UK since the EU referendum. The EU’s problems are structural and not cyclical. They are largely self-inflicted. The euro’s structure is the root cause of the problem, together with increasingly costly one-size-fits-all regulation that simply does not work for such a disparate Union. The price of preserving the euro is likely to continue to lead to low growth and poor employment prospects. Italy, as an example, has a smaller economy than 15 years ago. Such dreadful performance is fuelling economic and political dissatisfaction in Italy itself and across the EU. The question should be: why can our policy makers not see that while we must remain friends with our European neighbours, the EU project has failed Europe? The answer is for Britain is to re-emerge as a true global trading nation."

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:53 - Sep 27 with 297 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:34 - Sep 27 by bluey_the_blue

Nice video, conveniently recorded of Labour MP Karl Turner aggressively confronting Dominic Cummings BBC have subtitles for all the comments made.

For some strange reason, Turners comment 58 seconds in of "You should be in a ditch, dead" didn't get any subtitling. Funny that.


Perhaps he was referencing Boris' quote. Just a thought like.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:55 - Sep 27 with 295 viewsbluey_the_blue

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:53 - Sep 27 by WarwickHunt

Perhaps he was referencing Boris' quote. Just a thought like.


Arf!

So not a threat then when made by a Labour MP who aggressively rants at Cummings who, to his credit, doesn't react.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:56 - Sep 27 with 294 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:49 - Sep 27 by Kerouac

Lord Lilley;
(Peter Lilley is a former Conservative MP, representing St. Albans between 1983 and 1997, and Hitchin and Harpenden between 1997 and 2017. He has held a variety of ministerial and shadow ministerial roles, including serving in the Cabinet between 1990 and 1997 and as Shadow Chancellor and Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party in the late 1990s. He sat on the Exiting the European Union Select Committee between 2016 and 2017. He joined the House of Lords in June 2018.)



"Those campaigning to reverse the EU referendum result talk of the EU as if it is the very basis of British and European prosperity. When viewed against the evidence, such an analysis is simply untenable. A new report from Global Britain, £82bn reasons the EU held back the UK, shows how. Almost every aspect of the EU’s economic performance – not least UK trade with it – has been dismal, underperforming regularly against every corner of the globe – be it advanced or developing nations – for a very long period of time. For many countries across the European continent, EU-induced policy – primarily designed to hold the euro together – has directly led to economic hardship, socially damaging levels of unemployment and a questioning of the very fabric of their societies. The result has been a rise in more radical politics and people leaving their countries of birth to seek better economic opportunity elsewhere. This is the antithesis of what the EU was founded to achieve. The failure of EU economic policy has not only impacted EU nations but also cost the UK £82bn over the twenty years to 2017 due to lost economic opportunity, as weak demand has impacted negatively on UK exports to the Eurozone. To understand the failure of the Eurozone, we need to go back to a time when it did not yet exist. In 1994 the economies of the US and the future Eurozone were of broadly similar size – worth 24.9% and 24.5% of global GDP respectively. Today the US economy is 30% larger than the Eurozone. Simply put, had the Eurozone grown at the same rate as the US, the UK could have expected to have sold £82bn more in exports due to greater economic demand. The unfortunate truth is that EU economic performance has been the global laggard over the short and long term. By comparison, since the financial crisis, the UK economy has outperformed all the major EU economies including Germany. Overall it has grown 19% over that period compared with a 13% rise in the Eurozone. That 6% differential is worth £120bn, or to illustrate what that sum represents, just less than the entire NHS budget. For the British people, the beneficial result of the country’s performance has been more jobs. The UK has materially outperformed the EU in both job creation and reduction of unemployment. UK unemployment is at its lowest level since 1974. French unemployment is 2.5 times the UK level, Spain 4 times and Greece 5 times higher. Since the EU referendum, 750,000 more people are in work in the UK. This contrasts with HM Treasury forecast of 500,000 job losses following a Leave vote – meaning its prediction was an embarrassing 1.2 million out. Despite misplaced criticisms, job growth has been across the board and not just in the ‘gig economy’. More people work in manufacturing, construction, utilities, IT, health, education and the arts sectors than before the referendum. UK wage growth has started to pick up too and is growing in real terms, while the UK’s minimum wage is the second most generous in the EU. The underperformance of the Eurozone can be laid firmly at the EU’s own door. Fundamentally, the Eurozone is not an optimal currency area; it lacks fiscal transfers and is weakly controlled with no central Treasury. The structural weakness and disequilibrium of the euro has led to sub-optimal firefighting policy choices to prop the currency up. The lack of political will and democratic accountability make it near impossible to rectify its flaws. These are structural issues that will not be easily rectified, leading to continuing divergent performance, socially damaging unemployment levels in the south and a loss of competitiveness. The problem is the euro’s construction and there is no easy fix. Underperformance is baked in. Imbalances are growing, not reducing, be they employment levels, migration trends, fiscal strength, competitiveness and Target2 liabilities (intra-country balances). The big myth remains that the Single Market is central to UK prosperity. It is not. Over the last 20 years, UK trade has grown 12 times with China, 3.1 times with the rest of the world ex-EU, 2.6 times with the US and just 2 times with the EU. Moreover, the UK trades with a modest surplus with the world ex-EU but has a £96bn deficit with the EU. Does it not strike you odd that UK trade not only is growing faster where it trades generally under WTO rules rather than within the EU Single Market – and is in surplus, not enduring a huge deficit? EU citizens are voting with their feet. An estimated 3.5 million have moved to the UK over the last 20 years. Economic failure has directly led to widespread migration away from Italy, Spain, Portugal and most of Eastern Europe. People follow the opportunity and it has generally not been in the Eurozone. Again, despite claims, net EU migration has remained positive to the UK since the EU referendum. The EU’s problems are structural and not cyclical. They are largely self-inflicted. The euro’s structure is the root cause of the problem, together with increasingly costly one-size-fits-all regulation that simply does not work for such a disparate Union. The price of preserving the euro is likely to continue to lead to low growth and poor employment prospects. Italy, as an example, has a smaller economy than 15 years ago. Such dreadful performance is fuelling economic and political dissatisfaction in Italy itself and across the EU. The question should be: why can our policy makers not see that while we must remain friends with our European neighbours, the EU project has failed Europe? The answer is for Britain is to re-emerge as a true global trading nation."


Fûck me - he's trying to impress us with Peter Fücking Lilley now!

Bill Cash next?
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:59 - Sep 27 with 292 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:56 - Sep 27 by WarwickHunt

Fûck me - he's trying to impress us with Peter Fücking Lilley now!

Bill Cash next?


Go on, let us plebs know what Annie Lennox thinks about it all.

Washed up old has beens who have spent their entire adult lives behaving like a teenager and indulging themselves are the people we should be impressed by aren't they Warwick.

Cock.

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 10:08 - Sep 27 with 284 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:59 - Sep 27 by Kerouac

Go on, let us plebs know what Annie Lennox thinks about it all.

Washed up old has beens who have spent their entire adult lives behaving like a teenager and indulging themselves are the people we should be impressed by aren't they Warwick.

Cock.


Comprehension obviously isn't your strong point, dullard.

Now fùck off back to your cutting and pasting, child.
We can't wait for the next one...
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