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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 1112311 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:38 - Oct 3 with 486 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:17 - Oct 3 by Kerouac

Shanker Singham, a leading trade and competition lawyer.
Lars Karlsson, President of KGH Border Services, one of the best-known customs leaders in the world and former Director of the World Customs Organisation
and
Hans Maessen, a customs and business advisor.


Shankar Singham: https://www.prosperity-uk.com/speaker/shanker-singham-2/
Lars Karlsson: https://www.prosperity-uk.com/speaker/lars-karlsson/
Hans Maessen: https://www.prosperity-uk.com/speaker/hans-maessen/



OR you could listen to Warwick Hunt (He met Annie Lennox once), Lisa of London (She is v. important, v.v. cross and lives in a big house in London don't you know, surrounded by celebrities she is and all they talk about over the washing lines is 'Yellowhammer') or ECB (Clase's finest, he has fought tooth and nail to rise to the top of the DVLA jungle, which allows him to while away his working hours on the workings of Parliament and Constitutional matters generally).

Yeah, I see your point.
[Post edited 3 Oct 23:30]


Shanker Singham is still a cock and so are you, fanboy. Copy and paste that, cocker.

Ooh look - a bloke with a degree and a job title agrees with me! Twàt! 😂
0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:58 - Oct 3 with 457 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:38 - Oct 3 by WarwickHunt

Shanker Singham is still a cock and so are you, fanboy. Copy and paste that, cocker.

Ooh look - a bloke with a degree and a job title agrees with me! Twàt! 😂


Had enough of experts Warwick?

You certainly seem confused.
Wasn't a degree and a job title the criteria set by your side for the right to an opinion and a vote?
You dizzy f*ck.

How about you dazzle us by at least attempting a coherent argument in favour of UK membership of the EU every now and then.
Beyond you 'me old china'?

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

0

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:02 - Oct 4 with 449 viewsKerouac

For those who are interested in what the UK government is proposing in Northern Ireland (can get lost during the constant throwing of shiit by the 'Remainer' orangutans);



Written by Shanker Singham...
(Shanker Singham chairs the Technical Panel of Prosperity UK’s Alternative Arrangements Commission. He is is the CEO of Competere, head of Trade at the Centre for Economics and Business Research, a senior advisor to Huntsworth and Grayling, and Director of the International Trade and Competition Unit at the Institute of Economic Affairs. He is the author of a General Theory of Trade and Competition; Trade Liberalisation and Competitive Markets and a frequent speaker, author and commentator.)

This piece was co-authored by Hans Maessen and Lars Karlsson.




The UK Government has now made proposals for resolving the Irish border to the EU. They have been characterised as creating two borders for Northern Ireland, one with Ireland and one with Great Britain. In order to understand why this is not the threat that some suggest, we need to understand how borders have evolved over the years, and what is the difference between customs formalities and what is a customs check. Borders are in reality a series of transactions, not a line in the sand.

There is general consensus that border procedures can be implemented away from the border. The existing Transit system is available for this in legislation and IT. Since the UK will join the Common Transit Convention (CTC) it will be available in Northern Ireland and Ireland after Brexit. No new technologies or investment is required. It is essential that customs in Northern Ireland and Ireland facilitate the necessary procedures and that a customs industry is made available to help traders use the required procedures.

Post-Brexit border formalities are necessary due to international standards and the global trading system and are applied all over the world. The procedures are similar to other known business routines, like registration and reporting for VAT. The EU wants to apply its standard customs procedures after Brexit. Thus, export and import declarations will be required for all transactions across the border. The declarations will provide both the EU and the UK detailed information to monitor trade and apply all relevant regulations. The declarations will replace present VAT and statistical obligations traders have to fulfil now.

Most traders have repetitive export and import transactions, so for individual traders, standard formats for customs declarations will apply in most cases. Traders can be provided with free customs software and supported in the setting up of these standard declarations and procedures. However most traders will prefer to outsource this activity to a Logistic Service Provider (LSP).

International customs regulations, including in the EU Union Customs Code (UCC), provides for numerous ways for stakeholders involved in international trade to voluntarily register to receive simplified procedures for the formalities when trading across borders.

The information to make a standard and repetitive customs declaration can be found on the invoice that accompanies the exported goods. Since this invoice is needed anyway, a trader would face only limited additional obligations if he uses a customs service provider. We have suggested a Transitional Adjustment Fund to support small traders in this transition which would apply to businesses on both sides of the border, and which could be used for the hiring of an LSP or to expand staff in the business itself.

The LSP often collects partial shipments to fill a full truck. The export and import declarations can be filed on the hub of the LSP where the goods are transhipped. On the basis of the digital information in the declaration, customs can make a of risk assessment of the trades goods and perform an inspection which can take place at the hub, where the goods are easily available.

It is crucial to understand that physical export customs checks are rare (less than 1%) as there is hardly any fiscal interest. This is to be differentiated from regulatory checks where UK government proposals mean Northern Ireland would remain subject to EU Single Market rules until four years after the transition period at which time the Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive would make a decision as to whether to follow the UK in its divergence or to continue in the EU regime. In the former case, regulatory checks would have to be done away from the border in the ways suggested in our Alternative Arrangements Commission report, but this would be five to six years away (including the transition period).

If transit is being used, the (full truck load of) goods can pass the border under customs control, using a single Transit declaration. A Transit declaration informs customs at both sides of the border that goods will be transported from the place of loading to the place of unloading within a timeframe of mostly one or two days. If the goods do not arrive, customs can immediately intervene and ask the LSP about the whereabouts of the goods. Inspections upon import can be done at the import hub and may be more frequent, depending on digital risk assessment of the transaction. Within the CTC and EU customs law, declarations and inspections can take place at any location, which includes traders’ and LSP premises or any other place as long as customs has the ability to inspect the goods. So there is maximum flexibility to integrate customs procedures in the logistic process, and there is no need for posts close to the border.

The Transit procedures require that when a shipment crosses an external border, the barcode of the hard copy of the digital Transit declaration has to be scanned at an office of Transit at the border to proof the border is crossed. However, the information this action provides is of no practical use for the procedure. Either this unnecessary obligation can be abolished, or a simple track and trace app on the truck drivers mobile phone can proof that goods have crossed the border.

All customs declarations are digital and can be performed from any remote location. Customs can have a central unit to assess the digital information and send out mobile teams to inspect the goods. No formal customs offices are necessary to present or inspect goods. Trusted trader programmes also offer a wide range of alternative ways of replacing transaction controls and inspections with system-based controls, self-assessment, delegated inspections and audits.
Agricultural goods and those of animal origin do require additional regulatory checks. To safeguard public health, the EU requires that veterinary goods are checked at a Border Inspection Post. But in case of specific geographical circumstances inspections can also take place away from the border. Inspections of agricultural goods are mainly based on additional administrative documents about the quality of the goods. Additional physical inspections can also take place at the points of loading and unloading in combination with the customs declaration. Mutual recognition of each other procedures and inspection results can increase efficiency. To safeguard consumer health, the present Traces system already is available to track and trace agricultural products across EU borders and between EU traders. Traces can be used to further increase monitoring the trade in agricultural goods.

EU customs law provides for ways to make repetitive procedures more efficient. For this traders or customs service providers have to be certified as a trusted trader. This is a voluntary model in line with international standards from World Customs Organization, generating a status as Authorized Economic Operator (AEO), which makes it possible to lower cost for the involved formalities while still ensuring compliance with rules and regulations. The model is open for all stakeholders involved in the supply chain. By recognising each other’s certifications, these simplifications can be made available for transactions that between the EU and the UK, inclusive the Irish land border. The requirements for certification are high but larger companies, LSPs and customs brokers can fulfil the requirements.

There are other procedures as well which facilitate the necessary requirements of cross-border trade. These models makes it possible to move formalities, controls and inspections away from the border, while still ensuring the purpose of the rules and regulations and protecting the interests of the countries involved. International experience demonstrates that system based controls are more efficient for both traders and Government. Modern border management strategies do not remove border formalities, controls and inspection, but instead replace these traditional transaction based activities with more efficient models and programmes.

Agricultural trade is highly regulated within the EU. Large agricultural companies need to have full insight and control about for example milk that is at present produced on one side and processed on the other side of the Northern Irish border. Customs procedures can then be based on the existing internal procedures to safeguard all agricultural standards.

Customs procedures are primarily designed for regular trade which makes these procedures more challenging for small or incidental traders. However, through certified customs service providers compliant traders can make use of facilitations for certified companies, as if they were certified themselves. A well-organised service sector, matched by cooperative customs authorities, can facilitate this trade. We have suggested am exemption for the smallest traders, operating below the VAT threshold on both sides of the border. These traders are not a threat to the integrity the internal markets of the EU and the UK.

Ultimately, the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) which the UK proposes would further simplify customs operations. As duties are reduced, the financial impact of customs procedures decreases. Both the UK and Ireland can further decide to introduce postponed accounting to reduce the need for the payment and refund of VAT.

There is a political need to agree on common procedures and to build trust regarding their implementation. In addition, the procedures have to be facilitated by an adequate customs organisation and customs industry. If a deal is done, these can be effected in the transition period, but we will need to work on this immediately. This piece was co-authored by Hans Maessen and Lars Karlsson.

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:04 - Oct 4 with 443 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:58 - Oct 3 by Kerouac

Had enough of experts Warwick?

You certainly seem confused.
Wasn't a degree and a job title the criteria set by your side for the right to an opinion and a vote?
You dizzy f*ck.

How about you dazzle us by at least attempting a coherent argument in favour of UK membership of the EU every now and then.
Beyond you 'me old china'?


See previous posts, dull cûnt and go easy on the copy and pasting marathons from your idols it's way beyond fûcking tedious now.
0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:06 - Oct 4 with 441 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:04 - Oct 4 by WarwickHunt

See previous posts, dull cûnt and go easy on the copy and pasting marathons from your idols it's way beyond fûcking tedious now.


[Post edited 4 Oct 0:06]

Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:08 - Oct 4 with 433 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:06 - Oct 4 by Kerouac

[Post edited 4 Oct 0:06]


Oh dear - the copy and paste king had a system malfunction.😂
[Post edited 4 Oct 0:10]
0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:14 - Oct 4 with 420 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:02 - Oct 4 by Kerouac

For those who are interested in what the UK government is proposing in Northern Ireland (can get lost during the constant throwing of shiit by the 'Remainer' orangutans);



Written by Shanker Singham...
(Shanker Singham chairs the Technical Panel of Prosperity UK’s Alternative Arrangements Commission. He is is the CEO of Competere, head of Trade at the Centre for Economics and Business Research, a senior advisor to Huntsworth and Grayling, and Director of the International Trade and Competition Unit at the Institute of Economic Affairs. He is the author of a General Theory of Trade and Competition; Trade Liberalisation and Competitive Markets and a frequent speaker, author and commentator.)

This piece was co-authored by Hans Maessen and Lars Karlsson.




The UK Government has now made proposals for resolving the Irish border to the EU. They have been characterised as creating two borders for Northern Ireland, one with Ireland and one with Great Britain. In order to understand why this is not the threat that some suggest, we need to understand how borders have evolved over the years, and what is the difference between customs formalities and what is a customs check. Borders are in reality a series of transactions, not a line in the sand.

There is general consensus that border procedures can be implemented away from the border. The existing Transit system is available for this in legislation and IT. Since the UK will join the Common Transit Convention (CTC) it will be available in Northern Ireland and Ireland after Brexit. No new technologies or investment is required. It is essential that customs in Northern Ireland and Ireland facilitate the necessary procedures and that a customs industry is made available to help traders use the required procedures.

Post-Brexit border formalities are necessary due to international standards and the global trading system and are applied all over the world. The procedures are similar to other known business routines, like registration and reporting for VAT. The EU wants to apply its standard customs procedures after Brexit. Thus, export and import declarations will be required for all transactions across the border. The declarations will provide both the EU and the UK detailed information to monitor trade and apply all relevant regulations. The declarations will replace present VAT and statistical obligations traders have to fulfil now.

Most traders have repetitive export and import transactions, so for individual traders, standard formats for customs declarations will apply in most cases. Traders can be provided with free customs software and supported in the setting up of these standard declarations and procedures. However most traders will prefer to outsource this activity to a Logistic Service Provider (LSP).

International customs regulations, including in the EU Union Customs Code (UCC), provides for numerous ways for stakeholders involved in international trade to voluntarily register to receive simplified procedures for the formalities when trading across borders.

The information to make a standard and repetitive customs declaration can be found on the invoice that accompanies the exported goods. Since this invoice is needed anyway, a trader would face only limited additional obligations if he uses a customs service provider. We have suggested a Transitional Adjustment Fund to support small traders in this transition which would apply to businesses on both sides of the border, and which could be used for the hiring of an LSP or to expand staff in the business itself.

The LSP often collects partial shipments to fill a full truck. The export and import declarations can be filed on the hub of the LSP where the goods are transhipped. On the basis of the digital information in the declaration, customs can make a of risk assessment of the trades goods and perform an inspection which can take place at the hub, where the goods are easily available.

It is crucial to understand that physical export customs checks are rare (less than 1%) as there is hardly any fiscal interest. This is to be differentiated from regulatory checks where UK government proposals mean Northern Ireland would remain subject to EU Single Market rules until four years after the transition period at which time the Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive would make a decision as to whether to follow the UK in its divergence or to continue in the EU regime. In the former case, regulatory checks would have to be done away from the border in the ways suggested in our Alternative Arrangements Commission report, but this would be five to six years away (including the transition period).

If transit is being used, the (full truck load of) goods can pass the border under customs control, using a single Transit declaration. A Transit declaration informs customs at both sides of the border that goods will be transported from the place of loading to the place of unloading within a timeframe of mostly one or two days. If the goods do not arrive, customs can immediately intervene and ask the LSP about the whereabouts of the goods. Inspections upon import can be done at the import hub and may be more frequent, depending on digital risk assessment of the transaction. Within the CTC and EU customs law, declarations and inspections can take place at any location, which includes traders’ and LSP premises or any other place as long as customs has the ability to inspect the goods. So there is maximum flexibility to integrate customs procedures in the logistic process, and there is no need for posts close to the border.

The Transit procedures require that when a shipment crosses an external border, the barcode of the hard copy of the digital Transit declaration has to be scanned at an office of Transit at the border to proof the border is crossed. However, the information this action provides is of no practical use for the procedure. Either this unnecessary obligation can be abolished, or a simple track and trace app on the truck drivers mobile phone can proof that goods have crossed the border.

All customs declarations are digital and can be performed from any remote location. Customs can have a central unit to assess the digital information and send out mobile teams to inspect the goods. No formal customs offices are necessary to present or inspect goods. Trusted trader programmes also offer a wide range of alternative ways of replacing transaction controls and inspections with system-based controls, self-assessment, delegated inspections and audits.
Agricultural goods and those of animal origin do require additional regulatory checks. To safeguard public health, the EU requires that veterinary goods are checked at a Border Inspection Post. But in case of specific geographical circumstances inspections can also take place away from the border. Inspections of agricultural goods are mainly based on additional administrative documents about the quality of the goods. Additional physical inspections can also take place at the points of loading and unloading in combination with the customs declaration. Mutual recognition of each other procedures and inspection results can increase efficiency. To safeguard consumer health, the present Traces system already is available to track and trace agricultural products across EU borders and between EU traders. Traces can be used to further increase monitoring the trade in agricultural goods.

EU customs law provides for ways to make repetitive procedures more efficient. For this traders or customs service providers have to be certified as a trusted trader. This is a voluntary model in line with international standards from World Customs Organization, generating a status as Authorized Economic Operator (AEO), which makes it possible to lower cost for the involved formalities while still ensuring compliance with rules and regulations. The model is open for all stakeholders involved in the supply chain. By recognising each other’s certifications, these simplifications can be made available for transactions that between the EU and the UK, inclusive the Irish land border. The requirements for certification are high but larger companies, LSPs and customs brokers can fulfil the requirements.

There are other procedures as well which facilitate the necessary requirements of cross-border trade. These models makes it possible to move formalities, controls and inspections away from the border, while still ensuring the purpose of the rules and regulations and protecting the interests of the countries involved. International experience demonstrates that system based controls are more efficient for both traders and Government. Modern border management strategies do not remove border formalities, controls and inspection, but instead replace these traditional transaction based activities with more efficient models and programmes.

Agricultural trade is highly regulated within the EU. Large agricultural companies need to have full insight and control about for example milk that is at present produced on one side and processed on the other side of the Northern Irish border. Customs procedures can then be based on the existing internal procedures to safeguard all agricultural standards.

Customs procedures are primarily designed for regular trade which makes these procedures more challenging for small or incidental traders. However, through certified customs service providers compliant traders can make use of facilitations for certified companies, as if they were certified themselves. A well-organised service sector, matched by cooperative customs authorities, can facilitate this trade. We have suggested am exemption for the smallest traders, operating below the VAT threshold on both sides of the border. These traders are not a threat to the integrity the internal markets of the EU and the UK.

Ultimately, the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) which the UK proposes would further simplify customs operations. As duties are reduced, the financial impact of customs procedures decreases. Both the UK and Ireland can further decide to introduce postponed accounting to reduce the need for the payment and refund of VAT.

There is a political need to agree on common procedures and to build trust regarding their implementation. In addition, the procedures have to be facilitated by an adequate customs organisation and customs industry. If a deal is done, these can be effected in the transition period, but we will need to work on this immediately. This piece was co-authored by Hans Maessen and Lars Karlsson.


It was shit the first time you posted it...
0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:35 - Oct 4 with 407 viewsKerouac

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:14 - Oct 4 by WarwickHunt

It was shit the first time you posted it...



Poll: Who would you most like to see banned?

0
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 06:03 - Oct 4 with 385 viewslonglostjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 00:02 - Oct 4 by Kerouac

For those who are interested in what the UK government is proposing in Northern Ireland (can get lost during the constant throwing of shiit by the 'Remainer' orangutans);



Written by Shanker Singham...
(Shanker Singham chairs the Technical Panel of Prosperity UK’s Alternative Arrangements Commission. He is is the CEO of Competere, head of Trade at the Centre for Economics and Business Research, a senior advisor to Huntsworth and Grayling, and Director of the International Trade and Competition Unit at the Institute of Economic Affairs. He is the author of a General Theory of Trade and Competition; Trade Liberalisation and Competitive Markets and a frequent speaker, author and commentator.)

This piece was co-authored by Hans Maessen and Lars Karlsson.




The UK Government has now made proposals for resolving the Irish border to the EU. They have been characterised as creating two borders for Northern Ireland, one with Ireland and one with Great Britain. In order to understand why this is not the threat that some suggest, we need to understand how borders have evolved over the years, and what is the difference between customs formalities and what is a customs check. Borders are in reality a series of transactions, not a line in the sand.

There is general consensus that border procedures can be implemented away from the border. The existing Transit system is available for this in legislation and IT. Since the UK will join the Common Transit Convention (CTC) it will be available in Northern Ireland and Ireland after Brexit. No new technologies or investment is required. It is essential that customs in Northern Ireland and Ireland facilitate the necessary procedures and that a customs industry is made available to help traders use the required procedures.

Post-Brexit border formalities are necessary due to international standards and the global trading system and are applied all over the world. The procedures are similar to other known business routines, like registration and reporting for VAT. The EU wants to apply its standard customs procedures after Brexit. Thus, export and import declarations will be required for all transactions across the border. The declarations will provide both the EU and the UK detailed information to monitor trade and apply all relevant regulations. The declarations will replace present VAT and statistical obligations traders have to fulfil now.

Most traders have repetitive export and import transactions, so for individual traders, standard formats for customs declarations will apply in most cases. Traders can be provided with free customs software and supported in the setting up of these standard declarations and procedures. However most traders will prefer to outsource this activity to a Logistic Service Provider (LSP).

International customs regulations, including in the EU Union Customs Code (UCC), provides for numerous ways for stakeholders involved in international trade to voluntarily register to receive simplified procedures for the formalities when trading across borders.

The information to make a standard and repetitive customs declaration can be found on the invoice that accompanies the exported goods. Since this invoice is needed anyway, a trader would face only limited additional obligations if he uses a customs service provider. We have suggested a Transitional Adjustment Fund to support small traders in this transition which would apply to businesses on both sides of the border, and which could be used for the hiring of an LSP or to expand staff in the business itself.

The LSP often collects partial shipments to fill a full truck. The export and import declarations can be filed on the hub of the LSP where the goods are transhipped. On the basis of the digital information in the declaration, customs can make a of risk assessment of the trades goods and perform an inspection which can take place at the hub, where the goods are easily available.

It is crucial to understand that physical export customs checks are rare (less than 1%) as there is hardly any fiscal interest. This is to be differentiated from regulatory checks where UK government proposals mean Northern Ireland would remain subject to EU Single Market rules until four years after the transition period at which time the Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive would make a decision as to whether to follow the UK in its divergence or to continue in the EU regime. In the former case, regulatory checks would have to be done away from the border in the ways suggested in our Alternative Arrangements Commission report, but this would be five to six years away (including the transition period).

If transit is being used, the (full truck load of) goods can pass the border under customs control, using a single Transit declaration. A Transit declaration informs customs at both sides of the border that goods will be transported from the place of loading to the place of unloading within a timeframe of mostly one or two days. If the goods do not arrive, customs can immediately intervene and ask the LSP about the whereabouts of the goods. Inspections upon import can be done at the import hub and may be more frequent, depending on digital risk assessment of the transaction. Within the CTC and EU customs law, declarations and inspections can take place at any location, which includes traders’ and LSP premises or any other place as long as customs has the ability to inspect the goods. So there is maximum flexibility to integrate customs procedures in the logistic process, and there is no need for posts close to the border.

The Transit procedures require that when a shipment crosses an external border, the barcode of the hard copy of the digital Transit declaration has to be scanned at an office of Transit at the border to proof the border is crossed. However, the information this action provides is of no practical use for the procedure. Either this unnecessary obligation can be abolished, or a simple track and trace app on the truck drivers mobile phone can proof that goods have crossed the border.

All customs declarations are digital and can be performed from any remote location. Customs can have a central unit to assess the digital information and send out mobile teams to inspect the goods. No formal customs offices are necessary to present or inspect goods. Trusted trader programmes also offer a wide range of alternative ways of replacing transaction controls and inspections with system-based controls, self-assessment, delegated inspections and audits.
Agricultural goods and those of animal origin do require additional regulatory checks. To safeguard public health, the EU requires that veterinary goods are checked at a Border Inspection Post. But in case of specific geographical circumstances inspections can also take place away from the border. Inspections of agricultural goods are mainly based on additional administrative documents about the quality of the goods. Additional physical inspections can also take place at the points of loading and unloading in combination with the customs declaration. Mutual recognition of each other procedures and inspection results can increase efficiency. To safeguard consumer health, the present Traces system already is available to track and trace agricultural products across EU borders and between EU traders. Traces can be used to further increase monitoring the trade in agricultural goods.

EU customs law provides for ways to make repetitive procedures more efficient. For this traders or customs service providers have to be certified as a trusted trader. This is a voluntary model in line with international standards from World Customs Organization, generating a status as Authorized Economic Operator (AEO), which makes it possible to lower cost for the involved formalities while still ensuring compliance with rules and regulations. The model is open for all stakeholders involved in the supply chain. By recognising each other’s certifications, these simplifications can be made available for transactions that between the EU and the UK, inclusive the Irish land border. The requirements for certification are high but larger companies, LSPs and customs brokers can fulfil the requirements.

There are other procedures as well which facilitate the necessary requirements of cross-border trade. These models makes it possible to move formalities, controls and inspections away from the border, while still ensuring the purpose of the rules and regulations and protecting the interests of the countries involved. International experience demonstrates that system based controls are more efficient for both traders and Government. Modern border management strategies do not remove border formalities, controls and inspection, but instead replace these traditional transaction based activities with more efficient models and programmes.

Agricultural trade is highly regulated within the EU. Large agricultural companies need to have full insight and control about for example milk that is at present produced on one side and processed on the other side of the Northern Irish border. Customs procedures can then be based on the existing internal procedures to safeguard all agricultural standards.

Customs procedures are primarily designed for regular trade which makes these procedures more challenging for small or incidental traders. However, through certified customs service providers compliant traders can make use of facilitations for certified companies, as if they were certified themselves. A well-organised service sector, matched by cooperative customs authorities, can facilitate this trade. We have suggested am exemption for the smallest traders, operating below the VAT threshold on both sides of the border. These traders are not a threat to the integrity the internal markets of the EU and the UK.

Ultimately, the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) which the UK proposes would further simplify customs operations. As duties are reduced, the financial impact of customs procedures decreases. Both the UK and Ireland can further decide to introduce postponed accounting to reduce the need for the payment and refund of VAT.

There is a political need to agree on common procedures and to build trust regarding their implementation. In addition, the procedures have to be facilitated by an adequate customs organisation and customs industry. If a deal is done, these can be effected in the transition period, but we will need to work on this immediately. This piece was co-authored by Hans Maessen and Lars Karlsson.


Senior advisor to a PR firm specializing in Healthcare Communications. Stopped reading after that.

Poll: Who is responsible for the Brexit fiasco?

1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 07:05 - Oct 4 with 364 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 06:03 - Oct 4 by longlostjack

Senior advisor to a PR firm specializing in Healthcare Communications. Stopped reading after that.


Well, quite.

Kerouac loves a CV. He’s easily impressed. The cap-doffing lickspittle.
0

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:13 - Oct 4 with 333 viewsGowerjack

Who funds the "think tanks" based at Tufton Street and to what end?

Plastic since 1974
Poll: Is ECB for tyranny?

1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:53 - Oct 4 with 300 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 22:08 - Oct 3 by Kilkennyjack

Uk asked for the backstop.

It is the EU who are negotiating brexit with uk, 27 nations as 1. Not just Ireland.

Ignoring the GFA is both wilfully ignorant and irresponsible in equal measure.

Johnson has lied to the Queen.

Border posts in Ireland will ensure one thing though, no trade deal with the US.

Feck you Mogg, Farage and Johnson. Feck you.


May and Robbins invented the backstop, with the help of the EU no doubt. Varadkar basically admitted live on tv that it was always a trap that would mean either handing over Northern Ireland or remaining in customs union before being allowed to leave. Just imagine what the other 26 states would have demanded. At least the cats out of the bag now.

The EU have negotiated for the EU as a whole, they don’t give a rats ass for the individual states. They’ve used Ireland as a negotiating tool.

0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:55 - Oct 4 with 298 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:13 - Oct 4 by Gowerjack

Who funds the "think tanks" based at Tufton Street and to what end?


Who funds the guardian?
0
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:00 - Oct 4 with 291 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:55 - Oct 4 by Jango

Who funds the guardian?




You really don't do yourself any favours do you?
0

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:02 - Oct 4 with 289 viewsladyjack

Two borders hey, when the English enforced one border they failed to police it, look at all the guns that got into Northern Ireland, yes yes I know they were said to have turned a blind eye if the guns were going to the one lot they were said to support.
I watched that show recently the one our state broadcaster wont televise although our state broadcaster was initially involved in making it, the Oscar winning filmmaker, in fact I think the show itself was actually nominated for an Oscar in its own right as well, they presented who the killers were with reams of evidence yet instead of the authorities arresting the murder suspects the authorities arrested the film makers for some crime or other against the state, the story is one or more of the killers was working for the English state and therefore it was covered up although it seems like the perpetrators are known, it was a trick that the English led state were said to have done all the time.
N.Ireland and Wales and Scotland need to breakaway from England as soon as possible.
[Post edited 4 Oct 10:17]
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:11 - Oct 4 with 271 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:00 - Oct 4 by WarwickHunt



You really don't do yourself any favours do you?


You’ve been schooled once today, go back to bed old man.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:12 - Oct 4 with 268 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:53 - Oct 4 by Jango

May and Robbins invented the backstop, with the help of the EU no doubt. Varadkar basically admitted live on tv that it was always a trap that would mean either handing over Northern Ireland or remaining in customs union before being allowed to leave. Just imagine what the other 26 states would have demanded. At least the cats out of the bag now.

The EU have negotiated for the EU as a whole, they don’t give a rats ass for the individual states. They’ve used Ireland as a negotiating tool.



https://www.rte.ie/news/brexit/2018/1019/1005373-backstop-tony-connelly/

A couple of relevant paragraphs for you as you'd obviously struggle to read and understand the whole article.

"The backstop was born on 8 November 2017.

It entered the world weighing just 66 words, one bullet point of six at the bottom of a "working paper" circulated that morning by Michel Barnier's team to officials from the 27 member states.

The bullet point read: "It consequently seems essential for the UK to commit to ensuring that a hard border on the island of Ireland is avoided, including by ensuring no emergence of regulatory divergence from those rules of the internal market and the Customs Union which are (or may be in the future) necessary for meaningful North-South cooperation, the all-island economy and the protection of the Good Friday Agreement." "

and...

"The onus to propose solutions which overcome the challenges created on the island of Ireland by the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union and its decision to leave the customs union and the internal market remains on the United Kingdom."
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:16 - Oct 4 with 265 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:11 - Oct 4 by Jango

You’ve been schooled once today, go back to bed old man.


Schooled?

Fûcking imbecile.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:22 - Oct 4 with 264 viewsladyjack

In that documentary I smiled when in one part it showed Gerry Adams carrying a coffin were they said something along the lines of the bloke in the coffin was an informer, the bloke behind Adams was an informer and the bloke first behind the coffin was an informer, aye it obviously leads to the question and what about Adams ?, a lot of people had suspicions about McGuinness and Adams, no wonder there was lots of breakaway republican groups.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:28 - Oct 4 with 254 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:12 - Oct 4 by WarwickHunt

https://www.rte.ie/news/brexit/2018/1019/1005373-backstop-tony-connelly/

A couple of relevant paragraphs for you as you'd obviously struggle to read and understand the whole article.

"The backstop was born on 8 November 2017.

It entered the world weighing just 66 words, one bullet point of six at the bottom of a "working paper" circulated that morning by Michel Barnier's team to officials from the 27 member states.

The bullet point read: "It consequently seems essential for the UK to commit to ensuring that a hard border on the island of Ireland is avoided, including by ensuring no emergence of regulatory divergence from those rules of the internal market and the Customs Union which are (or may be in the future) necessary for meaningful North-South cooperation, the all-island economy and the protection of the Good Friday Agreement." "

and...

"The onus to propose solutions which overcome the challenges created on the island of Ireland by the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union and its decision to leave the customs union and the internal market remains on the United Kingdom."


Yep we’ve been over this before. Doesn’t change my opinion that it was designed by ardent remainers Robbins and May with the help of the EU. If you remember it took less than half an hour for all 27 states to agree and sign off on it. It was a trap. Varadkar has admitted yesterday that nothing other than his 5 options would have ever worked.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:29 - Oct 4 with 254 viewsladyjack

When the English led British state ruled Northern Ireland the nationalists were treated as second class citizens so they had a 'cause', if and when Ireland becomes united again [some say its simply just a matter of time] no doubt the loyalists will be treated as equals but will some loyalists kick off ? and will they blame the British state ?
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:35 - Oct 4 with 244 viewsHumpty

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 08:13 - Oct 4 by Gowerjack

Who funds the "think tanks" based at Tufton Street and to what end?


We don't know. They won't tell us.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:39 - Oct 4 with 241 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:28 - Oct 4 by Jango

Yep we’ve been over this before. Doesn’t change my opinion that it was designed by ardent remainers Robbins and May with the help of the EU. If you remember it took less than half an hour for all 27 states to agree and sign off on it. It was a trap. Varadkar has admitted yesterday that nothing other than his 5 options would have ever worked.


Varadkar was stating the reality. It's a bitch, ain't it...
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:48 - Oct 4 with 237 viewscostalotta

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 23:12 - Oct 3 by Kerouac

Langweilig?
Das war ein George Bernard Shaw zitat!
Haben sie schon einmal von ihm gehört?
Er war ein irischer Nazi... langweilig!
Pah!
Dumm Kopf!


Ja, DU bist langweilig!

Je leiser Sie werden, desto mehr können Sie hören.
[Post edited 4 Oct 9:52]
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:49 - Oct 4 with 233 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 09:39 - Oct 4 by WarwickHunt

Varadkar was stating the reality. It's a bitch, ain't it...


He was stating what people against the backstop have been saying all along. Thick c***ts was the term I think used to describe them.
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