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The Countdown begins. 23:28 - Nov 10 with 133181 viewspikeypaul



https://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20190329T23&p0=1336&msg=Democr

1:19 pm today was the exact mid point from when the result that the Great British public had decided to leave the EU and the time 11pm March 29th 2019 that Democracy will be delivered.

Happy days.
[Post edited 25 Jun 17:01]

Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 17:54 - Jun 25 with 564 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 17:51 - Jun 25 by Shaky

You've got the wrong end of the stick, Penny.

I am able to back up my opinions with facts.


Such as ?
I’ve got a fact for you and that is 17.4 million beats 16.1 million.
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The Countdown begins. on 17:57 - Jun 25 with 564 viewscwm02

The Countdown begins. on 17:41 - Jun 25 by Kilkennyjack



BMW .....


They are from Germany (the most powerful EU nation) and so will be biased for the EU and it happened by "coincidence" just before a pro EU rally. Funny that.

As Jeremy Hunt says: "I thought it was completely inappropriate for businesses to be making these kinds of threats."

If they want to relocate for business reasons then carry on. It’s unacceptable to make threats. I don’t respect companies that play politics.

If companies relocate abroad, immigration should be reduced by the number of jobs lost. That’s common sense.
[Post edited 25 Jun 18:00]
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The Countdown begins. on 18:08 - Jun 25 with 544 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 17:23 - Jun 25 by Batterseajack

Whereas the Express is the bastion of truth and decency and has never willfully told a porky.


I’ve never said it was, although I always had a soft spot for the adventures of Rupert the bear.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Poll: What should Lord Bony change his name to?

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The Countdown begins. on 18:27 - Jun 25 with 524 viewslonglostjack

The Countdown begins. on 17:44 - Jun 25 by peenemunde

All you do is post other people’s opinions.
Haven’t you got your own ?.


Jeez Peenemunde you must be an absolute genius. I've never been able to come up with anything in my entire life that somebody else hadn't thought of. I doff my cap to you Sir.
[Post edited 25 Jun 18:40]

Poll: Who would you rather win? England or Sweden?

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The Countdown begins. on 18:29 - Jun 25 with 522 viewslonglostjack

The Countdown begins. on 17:57 - Jun 25 by cwm02

They are from Germany (the most powerful EU nation) and so will be biased for the EU and it happened by "coincidence" just before a pro EU rally. Funny that.

As Jeremy Hunt says: "I thought it was completely inappropriate for businesses to be making these kinds of threats."

If they want to relocate for business reasons then carry on. It’s unacceptable to make threats. I don’t respect companies that play politics.

If companies relocate abroad, immigration should be reduced by the number of jobs lost. That’s common sense.
[Post edited 25 Jun 18:00]


"As Jeremy Hunt says......."

Nice one Cwm
[Post edited 25 Jun 18:32]

Poll: Who would you rather win? England or Sweden?

0
The Countdown begins. on 18:30 - Jun 25 with 520 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 12:52 - Jun 25 by Jango

Why would people put their faith in Farage? He was just a voice with no power so that’s a load of crap. Remainers on the other hand put their faith in Cameron and Osbourne and I can’t recall if it was 1 or 2 days they resigned?


That’s reinventing history. I, and I’m sure plenty of others who would rather we’re in the EU, hate Osborne and Cameron with a passion. Their role in this turned people away. It’s the same with Blair. When he popped up I thought ‘what the feck are you doing?’ If there’s one way to turn more people away from Remain it’s to wheel out probably the least popular political face in the uk.
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The Countdown begins. on 18:36 - Jun 25 with 506 viewslondonlisa2001

The Countdown begins. on 17:09 - Jun 25 by Kilkennyjack



Who would have thought ?


Dear oh dear.

I do hope they don’t find that anyone was shorting the market overnight...
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The Countdown begins. on 18:39 - Jun 25 with 503 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 18:08 - Jun 25 by Highjack

I’ve never said it was, although I always had a soft spot for the adventures of Rupert the bear.


That cartoon about the woman who was never sure whether to shag someone or not was the highlight of my teenage years. The only trouble was I only saw the Express at my grans (she loved weather forecasts and the royals), so her wrinkled stockings kind out took the edge off it.
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The Countdown begins. on 18:43 - Jun 25 with 496 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 17:57 - Jun 25 by cwm02

They are from Germany (the most powerful EU nation) and so will be biased for the EU and it happened by "coincidence" just before a pro EU rally. Funny that.

As Jeremy Hunt says: "I thought it was completely inappropriate for businesses to be making these kinds of threats."

If they want to relocate for business reasons then carry on. It’s unacceptable to make threats. I don’t respect companies that play politics.

If companies relocate abroad, immigration should be reduced by the number of jobs lost. That’s common sense.
[Post edited 25 Jun 18:00]


They’ll be biased towards their business. None of these companies are saying ‘ooh, we want to overturn the will of the people so let’s release a statement’. Those talking are genuinely worried that events will harm their business. If the tables were turned they’d behave in exactly the same way. If they’re ‘pro-EU’ it’s because the EU is better for business, nothing to do with our pathetic little squabble of Leave versus Remain.
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The Countdown begins. on 18:49 - Jun 25 with 483 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 17:09 - Jun 25 by Kilkennyjack



Who would have thought ?


I know. Rather ironic after HJ saying that the Remainers’ God was the markets!

Farage acused of setting this up to by releasing his statement saying they’d lost despite having knowledge of polls saying the opposite. Presumably that’s insider trading? If proven I assume he’ll be in the brown smelly stuff.

https://www.lbc.co.uk/radio/presenters/james-obrien/how-brexit-day-concession-he

All (Leavers) hail the mighty markets!
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The Countdown begins. on 18:51 - Jun 25 with 481 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 18:36 - Jun 25 by londonlisa2001

Dear oh dear.

I do hope they don’t find that anyone was shorting the market overnight...


Oops. If I happened to mention Farage, it was purely coincidental. Nothing to do with him of course....
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The Countdown begins. on 18:55 - Jun 25 with 477 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 18:39 - Jun 25 by LeonWasGod

That cartoon about the woman who was never sure whether to shag someone or not was the highlight of my teenage years. The only trouble was I only saw the Express at my grans (she loved weather forecasts and the royals), so her wrinkled stockings kind out took the edge off it.


That sounds like an excellent episode of Rupert the bear.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Poll: What should Lord Bony change his name to?

2
The Countdown begins. on 19:14 - Jun 25 with 464 viewscwm02

The Countdown begins. on 18:43 - Jun 25 by LeonWasGod

They’ll be biased towards their business. None of these companies are saying ‘ooh, we want to overturn the will of the people so let’s release a statement’. Those talking are genuinely worried that events will harm their business. If the tables were turned they’d behave in exactly the same way. If they’re ‘pro-EU’ it’s because the EU is better for business, nothing to do with our pathetic little squabble of Leave versus Remain.


It really depends. If the EU is just a mechanism to lower wages, increase immigration, homogenize the continent so it can be easier to control - then it is very bad for the economy. It will lead to collapse in consumer demand and a huge inequality.

If EU would be democratic, if it would reflect the will of the people living in EU - who don't want open borders, lower wages no social benefits and want to regulate financial firms and globalization - then it would be a net positive for the economy.

Based on the experience so far EU is a globalizing steam-roller used to do things that individual countries on their own would never do. Having Brussels or Frankfurt do it is a convenient way to by-pass the voters. If that goes on, EU will collapse anyway. You can only push people so far - impoverishing your own people in the name of "flexible labor markets" or "charity to Third World" is not sustainable. There will be a huge backlash.
[Post edited 25 Jun 19:24]
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The Countdown begins. on 19:15 - Jun 25 with 463 viewscwm02

The Countdown begins. on 18:29 - Jun 25 by longlostjack

"As Jeremy Hunt says......."

Nice one Cwm
[Post edited 25 Jun 18:32]


I don't normally like Jeremy Hunt but what he said is right
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The Countdown begins. on 21:55 - Jun 25 with 392 viewslonglostjack

The Countdown begins. on 19:14 - Jun 25 by cwm02

It really depends. If the EU is just a mechanism to lower wages, increase immigration, homogenize the continent so it can be easier to control - then it is very bad for the economy. It will lead to collapse in consumer demand and a huge inequality.

If EU would be democratic, if it would reflect the will of the people living in EU - who don't want open borders, lower wages no social benefits and want to regulate financial firms and globalization - then it would be a net positive for the economy.

Based on the experience so far EU is a globalizing steam-roller used to do things that individual countries on their own would never do. Having Brussels or Frankfurt do it is a convenient way to by-pass the voters. If that goes on, EU will collapse anyway. You can only push people so far - impoverishing your own people in the name of "flexible labor markets" or "charity to Third World" is not sustainable. There will be a huge backlash.
[Post edited 25 Jun 19:24]


I’ll tell you what Cwm if you think that by leaving the EU you’ll be able to regulate globalization and global capital you are very very wrong. EU wanted to raise tariffs on Chinese steel. UK blocked. EU finally wanted to crack down on tax havens. UK blocked. EU wants to introduce the 3% tax on turnover of global internet companies. UK silent.
Where I agree with you is in the building trade. Undeniable that there is a problem with East Europeans passing themselves off as skilled tradesmen especially on big building projects in London for example. That’s not a problem of free movement of labour. It’s a problem of enforcing standards properly. Contractors taking short cuts to make bigger profits and lax controls from the Govt.
The EU is always a convenient scapegoat.

Poll: Who would you rather win? England or Sweden?

1
The Countdown begins. on 06:13 - Jun 26 with 329 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 21:55 - Jun 25 by longlostjack

I’ll tell you what Cwm if you think that by leaving the EU you’ll be able to regulate globalization and global capital you are very very wrong. EU wanted to raise tariffs on Chinese steel. UK blocked. EU finally wanted to crack down on tax havens. UK blocked. EU wants to introduce the 3% tax on turnover of global internet companies. UK silent.
Where I agree with you is in the building trade. Undeniable that there is a problem with East Europeans passing themselves off as skilled tradesmen especially on big building projects in London for example. That’s not a problem of free movement of labour. It’s a problem of enforcing standards properly. Contractors taking short cuts to make bigger profits and lax controls from the Govt.
The EU is always a convenient scapegoat.


It’s you who is wrong in regard to globalisation.
People all over Europe and the USA are waking up to what globalisation really means.
So you obviously accept globalisation and the destruction of the nation state.
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The Countdown begins. on 07:04 - Jun 26 with 324 viewspikeypaul

276 AFLI

What a beautiful day to be alive.

SIUYRL

Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 08:46 - Jun 26 with 295 viewscwm02

The Countdown begins. on 21:55 - Jun 25 by longlostjack

I’ll tell you what Cwm if you think that by leaving the EU you’ll be able to regulate globalization and global capital you are very very wrong. EU wanted to raise tariffs on Chinese steel. UK blocked. EU finally wanted to crack down on tax havens. UK blocked. EU wants to introduce the 3% tax on turnover of global internet companies. UK silent.
Where I agree with you is in the building trade. Undeniable that there is a problem with East Europeans passing themselves off as skilled tradesmen especially on big building projects in London for example. That’s not a problem of free movement of labour. It’s a problem of enforcing standards properly. Contractors taking short cuts to make bigger profits and lax controls from the Govt.
The EU is always a convenient scapegoat.


"EU wanted to raise tariffs on Chinese steel, UK blocked"

What the government did was prevent the dropping of the 'lesser duty' rule and the update of the EU trade directorate which would have transferred more power to the center.

They don't need more power. The EU commission needs to do its job, recalculate the 16% tariff *they came up with* and apply the new tariff retrospectively (which they have never done).

For there to be a lesser duty, somebody has to calculate a lesser duty in the first place.

The EU commission were at liberty to decide on a different clearing price and do a different calculation.

Why didn't they, and why have they never applied tariffs retrospectively? Did they borrow German car makers calculators?

"EU finally wanted to crack down on tax havens. UK blocked"

I will agree that is stupid of the Tories but Jean Claude Juncker has been President of the European Council since 2014, but from 1995 to 2013 he was Prime Minister of Luxembourg and from 1989 to 2009 he was also Finance Minister.

Luxembourg's tax system allows hundreds of U.S. corporations to store massive chunks of their business outside their home countries, which cuts billions from tax bills.

In the early 2000s, Luxembourg pounced at the chance to court retailers such as Amazon and Apple with tax incentives. There were the perks the state was happy to publicise – the lowest VAT in Europe, for instance – and there were case-by-case deals with large companies that it kept rather quieter. The Guardian September 2017.

Volkswagen has established several companies in Luxembourg in recent years, worth a total of 17 billion euros. The structure has raised suspicions that the German carmaker is trying to sidestep the tax office back home. Der Spiegel October 2017

Oh and by the way, Luxembourg is not a net contributor to the EU budget but is a net receiver of about 5 times their contributions. Luxembourg were not on the list of tax heavens! Also Malta, Cyprus, Ireland and the Netherlands were not on the list either. Which is a joke. Brought to you by Junker, the man you can trust when it comes to tax havens.

Read more: Why is Luxembourg considered a tax haven? | Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/100115/why-luxembourg-considered-tax-ha

If you wanted these to be changed, vote and elect people that will pass theses laws, Brexit gives the government autonomy to make new laws.
[Post edited 26 Jun 8:50]
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The Countdown begins. on 08:59 - Jun 26 with 285 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 06:13 - Jun 26 by peenemunde

It’s you who is wrong in regard to globalisation.
People all over Europe and the USA are waking up to what globalisation really means.
So you obviously accept globalisation and the destruction of the nation state.


So is the EU a protectionist racket or a globalised outfit?
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The Countdown begins. on 10:48 - Jun 26 with 255 viewsShaky

Honda faces the real cost of Brexit in an ex-Spitfire plant
Carmaker’s ‘just-in-time’ production would be hit if UK leaves the EU customs union
By Alex Barker and Peter Campbell in Swindon

FT, 26 June, 2018

Near Swindon in the south-west of England, on a site where Spitfires were made in wartime, Honda operates two cavernous warehouses that Brexit could overwhelm.

Although the combined buildings dwarf the assembly plant next door, they still only store enough kit to keep production of the Honda Civic rolling for 36 hours. This is the Japanese carmaker’s breathing space, and after a hard Brexit it might need to be bigger — much, much bigger.

Proud managers describe 2m components “flowing like water” to the factory line every working day. Some orders from EU suppliers arrive within five to 24 hours; others, such as customised car seats, are summoned from local suppliers just 75 minutes before use. Not a minute is wasted.

Honda now fears that the border checks that could be introduced as a result of Brexit will clog up the process. If Britain were to leave the customs union, Honda estimates European parts will take a minimum of two to three days to reach the plant, and possibly as long as nine days. Delivery times of finished cars may also be just as unpredictable.

To a car industry famed for its clockwork tempo, the potential delays pose an existential challenge. A warehouse capable of holding nine days’ worth of Honda stock would need to be roughly 300,000 sq m — one of the largest buildings on earth. Its floorspace would be equivalent to 42 football pitches, almost three times Amazon’s main US distribution centre. And its cost to operate would be as eye-catching as its proportions.

Car companies in the UK
BMW
UK plants: Mini, Oxford (4,000 staff); Rolls-Royce, Goodwood (1,700); engines, Hams Hall, Birmingham (800); bodywork, Swindon (850)
Makes: Minis, all Rolls-Royce models

HONDA
UK plants: Cars and engines, Swindon (4,000 staff)
Makes: Civic

NISSAN
UK plant: Cars and engines, Sunderland (7,000 employees)
Makes: Qashqai, Leaf, Juke

Such are the surreal options facing Honda — and manufacturers across a number of industries — which want to continue production in Brexit Britain.

Honda has had to deal with earthquakes in Japan and floods in Thailand. Adverse swings in currency markets have walloped profit margins. But these are nothing compared to what a clean break with the EU may bring. “The breadth of what we are dealing with is unprecedented in terms of its total impact,” says Ian Howells, senior vice-president of Honda Europe.

“Even though there is huge uncertainty around foreign exchange, our Japanese colleagues know how to manage that,” he added. “At the moment they don’t understand how to manage Brexit. It is a whole load of moving parts and nobody’s ever sure exactly how those parts are going to reconnect, disconnect or whatever.”

Other carmakers, such as BMW, are facing similarly unforgiving choices. Almost 90 per cent of the parts assembled in the German group’s four British factories come from mainland Europe.

“We do our best to maintain business continuity. We don’t want to give up our UK plants,” says Stephan Freismuth, a former customs officer who is now a director of BMW’s customs operations. “We always said we can do our best and prepare everything, but if in the end the supply chain will have a stop at the border, then we cannot produce our products in the UK.”
Honda supply chain graphic

With nine months left before Britain’s exit and Westminster still undecided on the direction Brexit should take, industry warnings are becoming increasingly blunt, and despairing. Airbus, BMW, Honda — blue-chip manufacturers in Britain are raising the alarm.

Voicing the frustration of some in government, Jeremy Hunt, UK health secretary, complained that companies such as Airbus were making “totally inappropriate” threats that “weaken our negotiating position”.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the pro-Brexit Conservative MP, says BMW is probably afraid of facing tariffs on its profitable exports to the UK. “You have to see what they are saying is driven by fear of losing access to our market, not the other way around,” he says. “The real issue is whether the UK remains an efficient base to manufacture — cost-competitive and value for money for customers.”

The warnings are not only over the implications of a no-deal exit in 2019, the most severe Brexit scenario. Manufacturers wonder whether their businesses will remain viable if the UK government achieves what it wants: an orderly withdrawal from the customs union, sometime in the 2020s. Investment decisions are looming.

“It is the end of the business model,” says one senior EU diplomat handling Brexit who has met car executives laying out the dire consequences for their industry. “It is nuts.”

Swindon’s site has long been a test bed for manufacturing experiments. At a secret Vickers factory during the second world war, “lean” methods were used to maximise Spitfire production at a time of scarcity: it was one of the oldest of the “just-in-time” systems that now dominate modern manufacturing.

In the late 1970s, Swindon witnessed the first partnership between eastern and western automakers. Workers at the ailing British Leyland were astounded to find Honda Ballade assembly packages arrive from Japan that had no missing parts, and could actually fit together. The spirit of “kanban” — Japanese lean manufacturing — had arrived on British shores.

Years later, Japanese cars were some of the first made in Britain to use a truly pan-European supplier base. Former prime minister Margaret Thatcher wooed Japanese carmakers to a Britain that “provides access to the whole European Community”. Honda’s first Accord rolled off the Swindon assembly line in 1992, just as the single market was about to be launched.
Honda exports about half its Swindon-made cars to the US — giving it just the kind of global outlook championed by Brexiters. “There is some opportunity,” says Justin Benson, head of UK automotive at KPMG. A weaker pound, he adds, could improve competitiveness and “see an upside for exports”.

However, Brexit has shaken the foundations of this partnership. Through unusually frank public interventions, Japanese diplomats have made their concern plain. The reality for Honda is that just 25 per cent of the Civic model is now “true UK content”. Nissan is in a similar position: only 15 per cent of its components are paid for in sterling. Put simply, the carmakers would never have developed these plant networks if they knew Britain planned to leave the EU’s customs union or single market.

“I don’t think it’s feasible for the carmakers to carry on running the supply chains they currently do if that happens,” says Tim Lawrence, global head of manufacturing at the PA Consulting group. “It’s just not going to work.”

Honda is one of the first carmakers to explain, in detail, the delays it expects for importing parts and exporting cars if the UK leaves the customs union. Based on experience of trading with the US, it estimates UK export clearance will take an extra 24 hours on top of the five to 24-hour order-to-destination journey within the EU today.

In addition, entry clearance into the EU may take a further 24-36 hours if current US arrangements are any guide. It has little hope that technological fixes will make a big difference.

The biggest delay of all would come from being forced on to the seas. At present about 75 per cent of Honda parts and cars move through the Channel tunnel rail link, which is likely to become a bottleneck in a world of border checks. The Eurotunnel has room for only 200 trucks at the UK side, and 900 on the continent. The sheer volume of small consignments makes handling paperwork or checks hard. Stoppages make for large queues and there is little chance to make up for delays.

Honda thinks congestion may force it to use sea routes, which are more intermittent, require bigger deliveries and add three to six days of delay — if ports have the infrastructure and space to cope with the extra demand.
Honda supply chain graphic

“Shipping takes a long time,” says Mr Howells. “That’s what we are facing.” Mr Freismuth of BMW also highlighted the “massive problem” physical checks would cause at Eurotunnel. “Without having a frictionless border, it will be a problem and there will be production stops at UK plants,” he said.

Mr Rees-Mogg plays down the impact of more trade having to travel by sea. “Just look at what goes through Southampton regularly. Most goods are cleared within seconds, only 6 per cent of goods take more than a minute to clear,” he says. “Once we have left the EU we will not be obliged to follow the EU bureaucracy. We can make it more streamlined.”

Theresa May’s stated plan is to leave the single market and customs union. But the prime minister’s team seem to have devoted a lot more energy into finding ways to soften the exit.

This includes pushing for a standstill transition to 2021, and potentially a “temporary customs partnership” lasting for at least a year longer. In Whitehall, senior officials imagine those transitional measures in practice turning into a final arrangement, where Britain would in effect remain in a customs and goods area with the EU. “Isn’t it obvious?” asks one British official.
Yet for business, such hints about minimal actual changes are not enough to work with given all the uncertainties.

In numbers
75%
Percentage of Honda components which arrive via the Channel tunnel. If there is disruption the tunnel cannot recover quickly

60,000
Estimated number of extra customs declarations that would be needed in the event of a hard Brexit

£2.1m
Extra costs for new IT systems and staffing to cope with Honda’s additional customs declarations, according to a Customs and Excise estimate

As a result, manufacturers are adjusting where they can. BMW is beginning to unpick supply chains, shifting production of engines destined for Germany from its plant at Hams Hall near Birmingham. Mr Freismuth says it is “preparing for a cliff-edge scenario in March 2019 based on the information we have”. Additional distribution centres are also planned to house more parts, but it “just won’t be possible to store everything”, he says. “You just couldn’t build enough warehouses.”

Honda has fewer options. Swindon is its global production centre for five-door Civics — and Honda’s only car factory in Europe. Mr Howells says Honda’s operations “are predicated on the customs union”, but says it could adapt to a “more inefficient model” outside.

But again the expectation gap between politics and business seems considerable. Honda expects it would need to handle 60,000 additional customs declarations, requiring a new IT system and additional staff. HM Revenue & Customs reckon this would cost Honda £2.1m a year in form-filling alone — a cost that does not include the hit to productivity from a more unwieldy supply chain.

Crucially it also assumes Honda has enough time to adjust. Mr Howells says he needs at least 18 months to adapt his systems to “the brave new world” outside a customs union.

Yet this uncertainty over regulations could last for years after Brexit negotiations end. Even with the conclusion of a UK-EU trade deal, which EU officials say will be signed in 2021 at the very earliest, many questions will remain outstanding. No trade agreement would include the kind of detail Honda needs on database fields, IT systems, form requirements or the application of measures to facilitate trade.

Honda could only begin to fully adapt to the new reality when the UK details its implementation plans, with legislation and technical standards. The process, in other words, stretches into the late 2020s. “We can only go as fast as [government] can go,” said Mr Howells.

Lower down the supply chain, the adaptation challenge will be even greater. When BMW talked to its network of 1,600 suppliers in Europe that sell into its UK plants, it found only half were prepared for customs checks.

Among its UK suppliers that are exporters, the situation was even worse — only a third had customs procedures in place, and many of those were using customs brokers that charge £40 per consignment. “We had to invite all our suppliers who are not well prepared for Brexit, and teach them the basics of customs,” says Mr Freismuth.

These are wrenching changes that no company would embark on unless absolutely necessary — the kind of certainly Britain’s shape-shifting Brexit debate never delivers. “What is it that I am dealing with? We have very regular meetings internally on Brexit and I don’t think we’ve given the same reports twice,” says Mr Howells.

“With foreign currency you can react, you can see what the problem is and you can react to it. With Brexit we just can’t react. We can scenario, we can contingently plan, but we can’t then react because we don’t know.”

In numbers
2m
Number of components coming into the factory production line in Swindon every day

10,000
Number of containers handled by Honda’s logistics and materials division per shift

25%
Percentage of a Honda Civic’s components which come solely from the UK

This uncertainty has carried a price in investment. Honda will soon be reviewing the plans for their next model of the Civic, which is due around 2021. In theory, it would be glad to source more parts from within the UK and Brexit provides an opportunity to do just that. But it would take years — perhaps even a decade — to shift more supply to the UK, even if the parts companies were willing. Mr Howells warns the UK supply base is “shallow” and more orders from Britain alone may not be a big enough incentive to deepen it.

Other UK suppliers are already feeling the pinch. Andrew Varga, who runs the specialist valves maker Seetru, noticed a 5-10 per cent drop in orders from the EU recently, even as other business grew. Longstanding EU customers sought to protect their supply chains against a Brexit shock, or a change in origin requirements.

“They’ve said they don’t want to talk to us any more, no new products, nothing,” Mr Varga says, staring out of a window. “These manufacturers tend to have long product life-cycles, so once you’re in a product, it’s difficult for them to engineer you out, but then, as the next model comes in, you don’t go into the next model,” he adds. “So, it’s a slow death process. That’s what it is.”

https://www.ft.com/content/8f46b0d4-77b6-11e8-8e67-1e1a0846c475

Misology -- It's a bitch
Poll: Poll: Which former manager would you most like to see back in charge now

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The Countdown begins. on 11:08 - Jun 26 with 239 viewsBatterseajack

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The Countdown begins. on 11:46 - Jun 26 with 221 viewsBatterseajack

Interesting diagram by Honda showing the difference from being in and out of the Customs Union. Should be clear to anyone that this would be hugely damaging to manufacturing industries which source parts from the EU and use a "just in time" manufacturing model. These factories / assembly plants only house around 36 hours worth of parts.

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The Countdown begins. on 12:04 - Jun 26 with 208 viewspeenemunde

The Countdown begins. on 11:46 - Jun 26 by Batterseajack

Interesting diagram by Honda showing the difference from being in and out of the Customs Union. Should be clear to anyone that this would be hugely damaging to manufacturing industries which source parts from the EU and use a "just in time" manufacturing model. These factories / assembly plants only house around 36 hours worth of parts.



More nonsense from you.
USA or Australia aren’t in the customs union and they seem to be doing alright.a
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The Countdown begins. on 12:07 - Jun 26 with 202 viewsShaky

The Countdown begins. on 11:46 - Jun 26 by Batterseajack

Interesting diagram by Honda showing the difference from being in and out of the Customs Union. Should be clear to anyone that this would be hugely damaging to manufacturing industries which source parts from the EU and use a "just in time" manufacturing model. These factories / assembly plants only house around 36 hours worth of parts.



What I find interesting is that for the second day in a row you have posted exactly the same thing as me only an hour or two later.

OK. perhaps more strange than interesting.

Misology -- It's a bitch
Poll: Poll: Which former manager would you most like to see back in charge now

-1
The Countdown begins. on 12:22 - Jun 26 with 185 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 12:07 - Jun 26 by Shaky

What I find interesting is that for the second day in a row you have posted exactly the same thing as me only an hour or two later.

OK. perhaps more strange than interesting.


News of the day and you keep beating me to the mark. I saw your post, but thought the diagram was worth sharing as it should help the Peenemundes here learn about the customs challenges we face outside the CU.
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