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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 21:07 - Jul 18 with 2999 viewsLord_Bony

What a forkn mess.

Theresa May and her team had no brexit plan in place after Cameron, basically they didn't have a clue what to do next.

But the EU did the other side of the channel ,they were scared and they knew they had to make an example of us to stop other countries following suit.

A recipe for disaster.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:11 - Jul 18 with 1546 viewsmagicdaps10

They didn't have a plan because they never wanted to leave....... Just as the next bigot who becomes PM.

It is a joke for sure, not brexit only but more so the clowns who have been running this country.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:16 - Jul 18 with 1526 viewsbluey_the_blue

Watching Legion instead, easier to understand...
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:17 - Jul 18 with 1524 viewsDarran

Why would May have had a plan when Cameron jumped?

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:18 - Jul 18 with 1518 viewsdickythorpe

Don't watch depressing shíte like that.
Watch the T20 on sky mun instead.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:18 - Jul 18 with 1517 viewsexiledclaseboy

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:17 - Jul 18 by Darran

Why would May have had a plan when Cameron jumped?


She should probably have tried to think of one before starting the process of leaving which was nine months after she took over.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:18 - Jul 18 with 1515 viewsLord_Bony

Parliament should at least have agreed on the framework of the brexit deal before article 50 was involved ... ever since then the clock has been ticking against us

PROUD RECIPIENT OF THE THIRD PLANET SWANS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD. "Per ardua ad astra"
Poll: iS tHERE lIFE aFTER dEATH

1
Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:21 - Jul 18 with 1502 viewsDarran

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:18 - Jul 18 by exiledclaseboy

She should probably have tried to think of one before starting the process of leaving which was nine months after she took over.


Yes absolutely but that’s not what Bonehead said.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:23 - Jul 18 with 1496 viewsexiledclaseboy

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:21 - Jul 18 by Darran

Yes absolutely but that’s not what Bonehead said.


Yeah but that not a surprise.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:32 - Jul 18 with 1475 viewsexiledclaseboy

Massively unusual to see serving cabinet ministers talk as frankly as this about the failings of the government in which they serve.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 11:46 - Jul 19 with 1282 viewssherpajacob

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:18 - Jul 18 by exiledclaseboy

She should probably have tried to think of one before starting the process of leaving which was nine months after she took over.


She appointed Davis, Fox and Johnson to work out the details.

They'd assured everybody it was going to be easy.

The scary thing for me is that if May had a substantial majority she would have happily severed off Northern Ireland. Only the parliamentary arithmetic of the DUP having the balance stopped her.

They don't care about Wales,NI or Scotland, their words are at complete odds to their actions.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 12:04 - Jul 19 with 1261 viewsBatterseajack

Most sensible people knew there was no plan at the time. But brexiter cheerleaders were heaping on pressure for A50 to be triggered and were content with Theresa May and David Davis not revealing any details on their plan because they were "keeping their cards close to their chest" as you would do in a game of poker.
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 12:07 - Jul 19 with 1255 viewsBatterseajack

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:11 - Jul 18 by magicdaps10

They didn't have a plan because they never wanted to leave....... Just as the next bigot who becomes PM.

It is a joke for sure, not brexit only but more so the clowns who have been running this country.


David Davis and Dominic Rabb wanted to leave. how did their role as Brexit Secretary pan out?
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 12:30 - Jul 19 with 1235 viewssherpajacob

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 12:04 - Jul 19 by Batterseajack

Most sensible people knew there was no plan at the time. But brexiter cheerleaders were heaping on pressure for A50 to be triggered and were content with Theresa May and David Davis not revealing any details on their plan because they were "keeping their cards close to their chest" as you would do in a game of poker.


Turns out they were holding 7 high.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 12:36 - Jul 19 with 1221 viewssherpajacob

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 21:11 - Jul 18 by magicdaps10

They didn't have a plan because they never wanted to leave....... Just as the next bigot who becomes PM.

It is a joke for sure, not brexit only but more so the clowns who have been running this country.


But the will of the people was to put the clowns in charge and give them control.

One of the many reasons I voted remain was I didn't trust British (mostly Tory) politicians to act in the best interests of British, and particularly Welsh, citizens. In this respect the EU has done a lot more for the rights of the individual than Westminster has.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 13:51 - Jul 19 with 1163 viewstrinityann

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 12:36 - Jul 19 by sherpajacob

But the will of the people was to put the clowns in charge and give them control.

One of the many reasons I voted remain was I didn't trust British (mostly Tory) politicians to act in the best interests of British, and particularly Welsh, citizens. In this respect the EU has done a lot more for the rights of the individual than Westminster has.


Can you list some examples
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 13:55 - Jul 19 with 1157 viewsBatterseajack

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 13:51 - Jul 19 by trinityann

Can you list some examples


Limits on working hours
Introduced in the UK in 1998, the EU’s working time regulations mean employees cannot be forced to work more than an average of 48 hours a week. Workers can choose to opt out, and there are some exceptions - including emergency service workers, soliders, servants in private households and fishermen - but this EU law helps stop bosses forcing their employees to work unhealthy hours. It also prevents young people being exploited by stating workers under the age of 18 cannot work more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week. The UK government resisted the controversial working time laws during EU negotiations and a future government could amend them.

Time off
The Working Time Directive also made days off a legal requirement. Companies have to give staff a minimum of 48 hours off work per fortnight and a rest time of at least 11 consecutive hours (12 hours for young people) every day. This is designed to stop workers being exploited and becoming unwell because of being overworked. The rules also include protections for night workers, ensuring they cannot work an average of more than eight hours a day and must be offered free health checks.

Annual leave
EU rules also secure British workers’ legal right to paid annual leave. According to the Trades Union Congress (TUC), the introduction of these laws gave six million Britons better rights to paid leave, including two million workers who had previously not been entitled to any paid leave at all. EU directives say workers must be given at least four weeks (20 days) of paid leave per year. This is less than the UK’s legal requirement of 28 days of annual leave, but the EU rules acted, until now, as a safeguard against any future government scrapping or reducing annual leave requirements.

Equal pay
Equal pay between men and women has been enshrined in EU law since 1957. It was also part of UK law before Britain joined the EU but in a more minimal way. The British government had refused to incorporate into law the idea that pay should be based on value, meaning a woman doing a more valuable or senior job could legally be paid only the same as a more junior male colleague. The UK government amended this only after enforcement action by the EU Commission.

Maternity rights
EU law guarantees women a minimum of 14 weeks maternity leave. The 1992 EU Pregnant Workers Directive also gave women the right to take time off work for medical appointments relating to their pregnancy. It placed a duty on employers to look after pregnant women, including putting them on paid leave if the nature of their work was unsuitable during pregnancy – for example, if it was overly physical and potentially dangerous.

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has made clear any discrimination towards a woman because of her pregnancy or maternity leave is sexism and should be treated at such. The ECJ also ruled that employers must give women on maternity leave the same contractual rights as they do to other employees, for example by continuing to pay in to pension schemes.

Parental leave
EU law says parents must be allowed to take 18 weeks of unpaid leave from work to look after a child. It also says workers must be allowed additional time off for other family reasons, such as an ill child.

Anti-discrimination laws
UK laws banning discrimination on the grounds of age, religion or sexual orientation come directly from the EU’s Equal Treatment Directive. EU laws have also made it easier for people claiming discrimination to get justice, by placing the burden of proof in discrimination cases on the alleged perpetrator rather than the alleged victim.

Compensation for discrimination victims
Under EU law, there is no cap on the amount an employer found guilty of discrimination can be ordered to be pay in compensation. This could change after Brexit. The last government commissioned a report on employment law, by venture capitalist Adrian Beecham, that recommended introducing a cap on compensation payments for discrimination. Until now, EU rules have prevented UK government ministers from doing so. Critics say the current law can be crippling for employers but others say it is a reasonable reflection of the huge consequences discrimination can have.

Agency worker protections
EU rules adopted in 2008 say temporary workers must be treated equally to directly-employed staff, including being given access to the same “amenities or collective facilities”. They also say EU member states should do more to improve agency workers’ access to training and childcare facilities. These regulations are not popular with employers and were resisted by the UK government during EU negotiations. They could be some of the first EU rules to be scrapped post-Brexit.

Health and safety
The EU’s Health and Safety Framework Directive forces employers to assess and act to reduce workplace risks. Other rules cover issues such as disabilities, noise and specific regulations for staff working with chemicals, asbestos or other potential hazards. The TUC says 41 of the 65 new health and safety regulations introduced in the UK between 1997 and 2009 came from EU laws.
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:08 - Jul 19 with 1126 viewstrinityann

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 13:55 - Jul 19 by Batterseajack

Limits on working hours
Introduced in the UK in 1998, the EU’s working time regulations mean employees cannot be forced to work more than an average of 48 hours a week. Workers can choose to opt out, and there are some exceptions - including emergency service workers, soliders, servants in private households and fishermen - but this EU law helps stop bosses forcing their employees to work unhealthy hours. It also prevents young people being exploited by stating workers under the age of 18 cannot work more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week. The UK government resisted the controversial working time laws during EU negotiations and a future government could amend them.

Time off
The Working Time Directive also made days off a legal requirement. Companies have to give staff a minimum of 48 hours off work per fortnight and a rest time of at least 11 consecutive hours (12 hours for young people) every day. This is designed to stop workers being exploited and becoming unwell because of being overworked. The rules also include protections for night workers, ensuring they cannot work an average of more than eight hours a day and must be offered free health checks.

Annual leave
EU rules also secure British workers’ legal right to paid annual leave. According to the Trades Union Congress (TUC), the introduction of these laws gave six million Britons better rights to paid leave, including two million workers who had previously not been entitled to any paid leave at all. EU directives say workers must be given at least four weeks (20 days) of paid leave per year. This is less than the UK’s legal requirement of 28 days of annual leave, but the EU rules acted, until now, as a safeguard against any future government scrapping or reducing annual leave requirements.

Equal pay
Equal pay between men and women has been enshrined in EU law since 1957. It was also part of UK law before Britain joined the EU but in a more minimal way. The British government had refused to incorporate into law the idea that pay should be based on value, meaning a woman doing a more valuable or senior job could legally be paid only the same as a more junior male colleague. The UK government amended this only after enforcement action by the EU Commission.

Maternity rights
EU law guarantees women a minimum of 14 weeks maternity leave. The 1992 EU Pregnant Workers Directive also gave women the right to take time off work for medical appointments relating to their pregnancy. It placed a duty on employers to look after pregnant women, including putting them on paid leave if the nature of their work was unsuitable during pregnancy – for example, if it was overly physical and potentially dangerous.

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has made clear any discrimination towards a woman because of her pregnancy or maternity leave is sexism and should be treated at such. The ECJ also ruled that employers must give women on maternity leave the same contractual rights as they do to other employees, for example by continuing to pay in to pension schemes.

Parental leave
EU law says parents must be allowed to take 18 weeks of unpaid leave from work to look after a child. It also says workers must be allowed additional time off for other family reasons, such as an ill child.

Anti-discrimination laws
UK laws banning discrimination on the grounds of age, religion or sexual orientation come directly from the EU’s Equal Treatment Directive. EU laws have also made it easier for people claiming discrimination to get justice, by placing the burden of proof in discrimination cases on the alleged perpetrator rather than the alleged victim.

Compensation for discrimination victims
Under EU law, there is no cap on the amount an employer found guilty of discrimination can be ordered to be pay in compensation. This could change after Brexit. The last government commissioned a report on employment law, by venture capitalist Adrian Beecham, that recommended introducing a cap on compensation payments for discrimination. Until now, EU rules have prevented UK government ministers from doing so. Critics say the current law can be crippling for employers but others say it is a reasonable reflection of the huge consequences discrimination can have.

Agency worker protections
EU rules adopted in 2008 say temporary workers must be treated equally to directly-employed staff, including being given access to the same “amenities or collective facilities”. They also say EU member states should do more to improve agency workers’ access to training and childcare facilities. These regulations are not popular with employers and were resisted by the UK government during EU negotiations. They could be some of the first EU rules to be scrapped post-Brexit.

Health and safety
The EU’s Health and Safety Framework Directive forces employers to assess and act to reduce workplace risks. Other rules cover issues such as disabilities, noise and specific regulations for staff working with chemicals, asbestos or other potential hazards. The TUC says 41 of the 65 new health and safety regulations introduced in the UK between 1997 and 2009 came from EU laws.


There is nothing ground breaking there, a few caveman could have rallied a good union to achieve this. All I see is work exploitation at the moment because influx of foreign labour.

Today's kids lucky to get 12 hours a week and then be on stand by incase they get a call. They normally get three strikes and then they are out. Where the next gen of home owners coming from. They will be slaves to landlords.
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:47 - Jul 19 with 1095 viewsBatterseajack

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:08 - Jul 19 by trinityann

There is nothing ground breaking there, a few caveman could have rallied a good union to achieve this. All I see is work exploitation at the moment because influx of foreign labour.

Today's kids lucky to get 12 hours a week and then be on stand by incase they get a call. They normally get three strikes and then they are out. Where the next gen of home owners coming from. They will be slaves to landlords.


Apart from holiday allowance, they're all benefits we now enjoy because of EU directives. How come the cavemen in our parliament didn't come up with these if it were that easy?

If it wasn't for EU employment law, that foreign labor could even further undercut our own native population. And, If immigration was an issue, why hasn't our government enforced stricter rules like Belgium currently do?
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:57 - Jul 19 with 1083 viewssherpajacob

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:08 - Jul 19 by trinityann

There is nothing ground breaking there, a few caveman could have rallied a good union to achieve this. All I see is work exploitation at the moment because influx of foreign labour.

Today's kids lucky to get 12 hours a week and then be on stand by incase they get a call. They normally get three strikes and then they are out. Where the next gen of home owners coming from. They will be slaves to landlords.


did you miss the 80's and Thatcherism?

it was in all the papers.

and every Tory leader since has been a Thatcher wannabe.

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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 15:12 - Jul 19 with 1062 viewsWarwickHunt

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:57 - Jul 19 by sherpajacob

did you miss the 80's and Thatcherism?

it was in all the papers.

and every Tory leader since has been a Thatcher wannabe.


Been in a coma, obviously.

No signs of a full recovery though.
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 15:24 - Jul 19 with 1058 viewsHighjack

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 13:55 - Jul 19 by Batterseajack

Limits on working hours
Introduced in the UK in 1998, the EU’s working time regulations mean employees cannot be forced to work more than an average of 48 hours a week. Workers can choose to opt out, and there are some exceptions - including emergency service workers, soliders, servants in private households and fishermen - but this EU law helps stop bosses forcing their employees to work unhealthy hours. It also prevents young people being exploited by stating workers under the age of 18 cannot work more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week. The UK government resisted the controversial working time laws during EU negotiations and a future government could amend them.

Time off
The Working Time Directive also made days off a legal requirement. Companies have to give staff a minimum of 48 hours off work per fortnight and a rest time of at least 11 consecutive hours (12 hours for young people) every day. This is designed to stop workers being exploited and becoming unwell because of being overworked. The rules also include protections for night workers, ensuring they cannot work an average of more than eight hours a day and must be offered free health checks.

Annual leave
EU rules also secure British workers’ legal right to paid annual leave. According to the Trades Union Congress (TUC), the introduction of these laws gave six million Britons better rights to paid leave, including two million workers who had previously not been entitled to any paid leave at all. EU directives say workers must be given at least four weeks (20 days) of paid leave per year. This is less than the UK’s legal requirement of 28 days of annual leave, but the EU rules acted, until now, as a safeguard against any future government scrapping or reducing annual leave requirements.

Equal pay
Equal pay between men and women has been enshrined in EU law since 1957. It was also part of UK law before Britain joined the EU but in a more minimal way. The British government had refused to incorporate into law the idea that pay should be based on value, meaning a woman doing a more valuable or senior job could legally be paid only the same as a more junior male colleague. The UK government amended this only after enforcement action by the EU Commission.

Maternity rights
EU law guarantees women a minimum of 14 weeks maternity leave. The 1992 EU Pregnant Workers Directive also gave women the right to take time off work for medical appointments relating to their pregnancy. It placed a duty on employers to look after pregnant women, including putting them on paid leave if the nature of their work was unsuitable during pregnancy – for example, if it was overly physical and potentially dangerous.

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has made clear any discrimination towards a woman because of her pregnancy or maternity leave is sexism and should be treated at such. The ECJ also ruled that employers must give women on maternity leave the same contractual rights as they do to other employees, for example by continuing to pay in to pension schemes.

Parental leave
EU law says parents must be allowed to take 18 weeks of unpaid leave from work to look after a child. It also says workers must be allowed additional time off for other family reasons, such as an ill child.

Anti-discrimination laws
UK laws banning discrimination on the grounds of age, religion or sexual orientation come directly from the EU’s Equal Treatment Directive. EU laws have also made it easier for people claiming discrimination to get justice, by placing the burden of proof in discrimination cases on the alleged perpetrator rather than the alleged victim.

Compensation for discrimination victims
Under EU law, there is no cap on the amount an employer found guilty of discrimination can be ordered to be pay in compensation. This could change after Brexit. The last government commissioned a report on employment law, by venture capitalist Adrian Beecham, that recommended introducing a cap on compensation payments for discrimination. Until now, EU rules have prevented UK government ministers from doing so. Critics say the current law can be crippling for employers but others say it is a reasonable reflection of the huge consequences discrimination can have.

Agency worker protections
EU rules adopted in 2008 say temporary workers must be treated equally to directly-employed staff, including being given access to the same “amenities or collective facilities”. They also say EU member states should do more to improve agency workers’ access to training and childcare facilities. These regulations are not popular with employers and were resisted by the UK government during EU negotiations. They could be some of the first EU rules to be scrapped post-Brexit.

Health and safety
The EU’s Health and Safety Framework Directive forces employers to assess and act to reduce workplace risks. Other rules cover issues such as disabilities, noise and specific regulations for staff working with chemicals, asbestos or other potential hazards. The TUC says 41 of the 65 new health and safety regulations introduced in the UK between 1997 and 2009 came from EU laws.


I thought the EU had no control over any aspects of our lives and it’s us who calls all the shots?

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 15:31 - Jul 19 with 1047 viewsBatterseajack

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 15:24 - Jul 19 by Highjack

I thought the EU had no control over any aspects of our lives and it’s us who calls all the shots?


Says who?
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 15:34 - Jul 19 with 1043 viewsHighjack

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 15:31 - Jul 19 by Batterseajack

Says who?


Remainers when it suits their argument.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 16:37 - Jul 19 with 988 viewsLeonWasGod

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 13:51 - Jul 19 by trinityann

Can you list some examples


Here's a list of 91 people-focused projects in Wales that received EU structural funds during the last funding round, tackling issues such as youth employment and skills development, poverty, research & innovation, increasing SME competitiveness, improving local infrastructure and facilities for the benefit of communities. Thee are just those funded through EU Structural Funds routed via the Welsh Government - there are plenty of others funded directly from the European Commission.

https://gweddill.gov.wales/docs/wefo/publications/170421-approved-projects.pdf

A significant number of these programmes wouldn't have gone ahead without the European funding. Not only that, but the benefit isn't only the funding, we can also benefit from the exchange of knowledge, skills and people with other European nations.

Yes, partly this is indirectly paid for via the UK's membership contributions, but only partly as Wales is a net beneficiary of EU funding in the UK. If you want an indication of how likely it is that this funding will be replaced, just look at what already happens. Wales is the largest recipient of EU development funding (by some distance), but one of the lowest beneficiaries of UK development funding. Which rings alarm bells as to what may happen with the proposed UK 'Shared Prosperity Fund':



What have the EU ever done for us, eh?
[Post edited 19 Jul 16:45]
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Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 16:43 - Jul 19 with 983 viewsWingstandwood

Britain's brexit crisis BBC one 9 on 14:08 - Jul 19 by trinityann

There is nothing ground breaking there, a few caveman could have rallied a good union to achieve this. All I see is work exploitation at the moment because influx of foreign labour.

Today's kids lucky to get 12 hours a week and then be on stand by incase they get a call. They normally get three strikes and then they are out. Where the next gen of home owners coming from. They will be slaves to landlords.


"EU legislation, which supposedly leads to better working conditions has not saved one job and is riddled with opt-outs for employers to largely ignore any perceived benefits they bring to workers. But it is making zero-hour contracts and agency working the norm, will undermine collective bargaining and full time secure employment"...... Bob Crow General Secretary of the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT).

I reckon he had his finger on the pulse when it came to the stark reality of what his own members were actually experiencing! Unlike Thatcherite-minded apologists who have zero empathy or concern for the youngsters/working class cos their love of the EU puts em in a parallel universe.

Aye like me you do not believe the EU-Nirvana sh1te, I have witnessed the reality of it up close and personal... If exploitative bosses do not like a law or ruling they either ignore it completely, or sack a zero hour contract worker and replace a.s.a.p with another zero hour contract worker. A case of replace with a more submissive individual terrified to stick up for his-herself for fear of an immediate sacking courtesy of agency employment the EU has been a force-multiplier of.
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