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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK 23:28 - Nov 10 with 1246678 viewspikeypaul



And like a typical anti democracy remoaner he decided the will of the people should be ignored the minute the democratic result was in total fecking hypocrite 😂😂😂😂😂😂

Despite it being voted in to law by the commons the spineless two faced remoaner MPs have totally abandoned any morals and decided to ignore the will of the British people.

It will be remembered and no election or referendum will ever be the same again in this country.

The one thing that will come is a massive surge in the popularity of UKIP or a similar party in the future who stand for the 52%.

Happy Days.

[Post edited 29 Mar 4:37]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Where wil Judas be sitting when we play Millwall?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:07 - Oct 12 with 409 viewsCatullus

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 16:35 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

What positive predictions?


https://www.handelsblatt.com/today/opinion/ursula-von-der-leyen-europe-is-formin

https://www.handelsblatt.com/today/opinion/ursula-von-der-leyen-europe-is-formin

The ability to negotiate our own trade agreements to our own benefit. To have the net 9 billion we sent the EU to spend in our own country. To be able to control our own borders. To have British law take primacy in every area.

The shame of it is, all of the nonsense we have witnessed this last 3 years has proved beyond doubt that the UK political system needs a massive shake up, a real root and branch reform because we can all see what a mess our politicians have made and they seem incapable of fixing it. Either because they are rubbish or because it is not in their self interest.
When Boris is the best choice (or Corbyns Labour won't have an election because they don't think they can win). When Farage looks like having a genuine attempt at getting some power, it seems obvious that things have gone beyond the absurd.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:11 - Oct 12 with 400 viewslondonlisa2001

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:07 - Oct 12 by Catullus

https://www.handelsblatt.com/today/opinion/ursula-von-der-leyen-europe-is-formin

https://www.handelsblatt.com/today/opinion/ursula-von-der-leyen-europe-is-formin

The ability to negotiate our own trade agreements to our own benefit. To have the net 9 billion we sent the EU to spend in our own country. To be able to control our own borders. To have British law take primacy in every area.

The shame of it is, all of the nonsense we have witnessed this last 3 years has proved beyond doubt that the UK political system needs a massive shake up, a real root and branch reform because we can all see what a mess our politicians have made and they seem incapable of fixing it. Either because they are rubbish or because it is not in their self interest.
When Boris is the best choice (or Corbyns Labour won't have an election because they don't think they can win). When Farage looks like having a genuine attempt at getting some power, it seems obvious that things have gone beyond the absurd.


We have a veto over an army.

We will not negotiate better trade deals on our own than we have with other countries as part of the EU - it’s legally impossible as they have Most Favoured Nation status.

We save £9bn and it will cost at least double that in lower GDP. Most estimates show it far, far higher.

We do control our own borders at present.

British law does have primacy.
2
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:13 - Oct 12 with 396 viewslondonlisa2001

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:05 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

It’s almost like there’s no actual solution to the border issue. Who’d have thought it.


It’s astonishing isn’t it. Many posters on here have said repeatedly how easy it is and yet three years later, no one can think of anything.
2
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:18 - Oct 12 with 388 viewsexiledclaseboy

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:11 - Oct 12 by londonlisa2001

We have a veto over an army.

We will not negotiate better trade deals on our own than we have with other countries as part of the EU - it’s legally impossible as they have Most Favoured Nation status.

We save £9bn and it will cost at least double that in lower GDP. Most estimates show it far, far higher.

We do control our own borders at present.

British law does have primacy.


I’m glad you saved me the bother.

Poll: Tory leader

1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:22 - Oct 12 with 378 viewsexiledclaseboy

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:11 - Oct 12 by londonlisa2001

We have a veto over an army.

We will not negotiate better trade deals on our own than we have with other countries as part of the EU - it’s legally impossible as they have Most Favoured Nation status.

We save £9bn and it will cost at least double that in lower GDP. Most estimates show it far, far higher.

We do control our own borders at present.

British law does have primacy.


Bluey says we’re bound to have better trade deals because some poky corner of Belgium won’t be able to veto them. Who are we to argue.

Poll: Tory leader

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:22 - Oct 12 with 378 viewslonglostjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:00 - Oct 12 by londonlisa2001

They’ve just Published an interview with Dodds. It’s taken them this long to understand the proposal.

I’m not sure they’ll come round - as far as they’re concerned it’s the same as May’s deal (as for NI it is apart from a nonsensical left hand right hand fudge). Actually worse as they will remain in customs union (to all economic intents and purposes) but also in the Single Market (which wasn’t there before).

Johnson was always going to pivot to throwing the DUP under the bus.


No, you’ve got it all wrong Lisa. It’s Ireland that have buckled because of the damage that a no-deal would have done to the Irish economy. Bluey said so.

Poll: Who is responsible for the Brexit fiasco?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:22 - Oct 12 with 377 viewsA_Fans_Dad

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 16:35 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

What positive predictions?


This isn't a prediction this is reality.

https://www.businessleader.co.uk/uk-outstrips-other-eu-nations-as-top-investment
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:23 - Oct 12 with 376 viewsCatullus

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:11 - Oct 12 by londonlisa2001

We have a veto over an army.

We will not negotiate better trade deals on our own than we have with other countries as part of the EU - it’s legally impossible as they have Most Favoured Nation status.

We save £9bn and it will cost at least double that in lower GDP. Most estimates show it far, far higher.

We do control our own borders at present.

British law does have primacy.


Umm no. EU law takes primacy over member states laws, unless the EU hasn't passed a law in a particular area obviously.

https://fullfact.org/europe/eu-law-and-uk/

Or maybe it's just a failure to understand eh ECB?

EU laws in areas for which the EU is responsible override any conflicting laws of member countries.

Two important ideas make this system work. These are ‘supremacy’, meaning the higher status of EU laws compared to national laws, and ‘direct effect’, meaning that EU laws can be relied on in court.

Both these constitutional principles were recognised decades ago in leading decisions of the EU court.

The court said that they were necessary to ensure the survival of the EU legal system and to guarantee that EU rules are followed in all member countries.

The supremacy of EU laws

The principle of supremacy, or primacy, describes the relationship between EU law and national law.

It says that EU law should prevail if it conflicts with national law.

This ensures that EU rules are applied uniformly throughout the Union.

If national laws could contradict the EU treaties or laws passed by the EU institutions, there wouldn’t be this single set of rules in all member countries.

The UK has accepted the supremacy of EU law for some time

Other member countries have been more reluctant to accept the supremacy of EU law than the United Kingdom.

The European Communities Act, passed by Parliament in 1972, accepted the supremacy of EU law. That principle has also been endorsed by the UK courts.

Although a more recent law included some restrictions on the application of the supremacy principle in the UK, the principle itself was not challenged.

Given the doctrine of Parliamentary sovereignty in the UK, meaning that there are no limits on what Acts can be passed or removed, it might be possible for Parliament to contradict EU laws. But this would seem incompatible with continued membership of the EU.

So Lisa, you are wrong. Unless right now you want to say fullfact is wrong?

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:27 - Oct 12 with 361 viewsexiledclaseboy

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:23 - Oct 12 by Catullus

Umm no. EU law takes primacy over member states laws, unless the EU hasn't passed a law in a particular area obviously.

https://fullfact.org/europe/eu-law-and-uk/

Or maybe it's just a failure to understand eh ECB?

EU laws in areas for which the EU is responsible override any conflicting laws of member countries.

Two important ideas make this system work. These are ‘supremacy’, meaning the higher status of EU laws compared to national laws, and ‘direct effect’, meaning that EU laws can be relied on in court.

Both these constitutional principles were recognised decades ago in leading decisions of the EU court.

The court said that they were necessary to ensure the survival of the EU legal system and to guarantee that EU rules are followed in all member countries.

The supremacy of EU laws

The principle of supremacy, or primacy, describes the relationship between EU law and national law.

It says that EU law should prevail if it conflicts with national law.

This ensures that EU rules are applied uniformly throughout the Union.

If national laws could contradict the EU treaties or laws passed by the EU institutions, there wouldn’t be this single set of rules in all member countries.

The UK has accepted the supremacy of EU law for some time

Other member countries have been more reluctant to accept the supremacy of EU law than the United Kingdom.

The European Communities Act, passed by Parliament in 1972, accepted the supremacy of EU law. That principle has also been endorsed by the UK courts.

Although a more recent law included some restrictions on the application of the supremacy principle in the UK, the principle itself was not challenged.

Given the doctrine of Parliamentary sovereignty in the UK, meaning that there are no limits on what Acts can be passed or removed, it might be possible for Parliament to contradict EU laws. But this would seem incompatible with continued membership of the EU.

So Lisa, you are wrong. Unless right now you want to say fullfact is wrong?


The UK parliament legislated to allow EU law to take primacy. It even says that in the link you provided. Otherwise it couldn’t have happened. Because the UK parliament is and always has been sovereign.

So yes, a failure to understand. No matter how many times you provide that link you still fail to grasp that EU law only has primacy because the UK parliament allows it to. You really are spectacularly dim. You even reproduced the relevant sentence mun.
[Post edited 12 Oct 17:30]

Poll: Tory leader

1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:27 - Oct 12 with 361 viewslonglostjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:23 - Oct 12 by Catullus

Umm no. EU law takes primacy over member states laws, unless the EU hasn't passed a law in a particular area obviously.

https://fullfact.org/europe/eu-law-and-uk/

Or maybe it's just a failure to understand eh ECB?

EU laws in areas for which the EU is responsible override any conflicting laws of member countries.

Two important ideas make this system work. These are ‘supremacy’, meaning the higher status of EU laws compared to national laws, and ‘direct effect’, meaning that EU laws can be relied on in court.

Both these constitutional principles were recognised decades ago in leading decisions of the EU court.

The court said that they were necessary to ensure the survival of the EU legal system and to guarantee that EU rules are followed in all member countries.

The supremacy of EU laws

The principle of supremacy, or primacy, describes the relationship between EU law and national law.

It says that EU law should prevail if it conflicts with national law.

This ensures that EU rules are applied uniformly throughout the Union.

If national laws could contradict the EU treaties or laws passed by the EU institutions, there wouldn’t be this single set of rules in all member countries.

The UK has accepted the supremacy of EU law for some time

Other member countries have been more reluctant to accept the supremacy of EU law than the United Kingdom.

The European Communities Act, passed by Parliament in 1972, accepted the supremacy of EU law. That principle has also been endorsed by the UK courts.

Although a more recent law included some restrictions on the application of the supremacy principle in the UK, the principle itself was not challenged.

Given the doctrine of Parliamentary sovereignty in the UK, meaning that there are no limits on what Acts can be passed or removed, it might be possible for Parliament to contradict EU laws. But this would seem incompatible with continued membership of the EU.

So Lisa, you are wrong. Unless right now you want to say fullfact is wrong?


I quite like EU laws.

Poll: Who is responsible for the Brexit fiasco?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:29 - Oct 12 with 356 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 16:43 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

Depends if there are enough Labour MPs to cancel out however many ERG holdouts there are.


“The useful idiots” led by that spineless gimp Kinnock.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:31 - Oct 12 with 350 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:27 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

The UK parliament legislated to allow EU law to take primacy. It even says that in the link you provided. Otherwise it couldn’t have happened. Because the UK parliament is and always has been sovereign.

So yes, a failure to understand. No matter how many times you provide that link you still fail to grasp that EU law only has primacy because the UK parliament allows it to. You really are spectacularly dim. You even reproduced the relevant sentence mun.
[Post edited 12 Oct 17:30]


Another thick, deluded Brexiter.

It’s almost like there’s a pattern emerging...
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:35 - Oct 12 with 338 viewsbluey_the_blue

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:11 - Oct 12 by londonlisa2001

We have a veto over an army.

We will not negotiate better trade deals on our own than we have with other countries as part of the EU - it’s legally impossible as they have Most Favoured Nation status.

We save £9bn and it will cost at least double that in lower GDP. Most estimates show it far, far higher.

We do control our own borders at present.

British law does have primacy.


May's "deal" committed our army to defend EU interests post Brexit...
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:36 - Oct 12 with 340 viewslondonlisa2001

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:23 - Oct 12 by Catullus

Umm no. EU law takes primacy over member states laws, unless the EU hasn't passed a law in a particular area obviously.

https://fullfact.org/europe/eu-law-and-uk/

Or maybe it's just a failure to understand eh ECB?

EU laws in areas for which the EU is responsible override any conflicting laws of member countries.

Two important ideas make this system work. These are ‘supremacy’, meaning the higher status of EU laws compared to national laws, and ‘direct effect’, meaning that EU laws can be relied on in court.

Both these constitutional principles were recognised decades ago in leading decisions of the EU court.

The court said that they were necessary to ensure the survival of the EU legal system and to guarantee that EU rules are followed in all member countries.

The supremacy of EU laws

The principle of supremacy, or primacy, describes the relationship between EU law and national law.

It says that EU law should prevail if it conflicts with national law.

This ensures that EU rules are applied uniformly throughout the Union.

If national laws could contradict the EU treaties or laws passed by the EU institutions, there wouldn’t be this single set of rules in all member countries.

The UK has accepted the supremacy of EU law for some time

Other member countries have been more reluctant to accept the supremacy of EU law than the United Kingdom.

The European Communities Act, passed by Parliament in 1972, accepted the supremacy of EU law. That principle has also been endorsed by the UK courts.

Although a more recent law included some restrictions on the application of the supremacy principle in the UK, the principle itself was not challenged.

Given the doctrine of Parliamentary sovereignty in the UK, meaning that there are no limits on what Acts can be passed or removed, it might be possible for Parliament to contradict EU laws. But this would seem incompatible with continued membership of the EU.

So Lisa, you are wrong. Unless right now you want to say fullfact is wrong?


Have you actually read what you just posted?
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:37 - Oct 12 with 337 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 16:35 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

What positive predictions?


The unicorns on the sunlit uplands will shit gold bars. Do keep up.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:37 - Oct 12 with 334 viewsJango

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:31 - Oct 12 by WarwickHunt

Another thick, deluded Brexiter.

It’s almost like there’s a pattern emerging...


Ye, the pattern is you using the same insults and one liners to try and impress your chums on here daily.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:38 - Oct 12 with 332 viewslonglostjack

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:29 - Oct 12 by WarwickHunt

“The useful idiots” led by that spineless gimp Kinnock.


Surely Kinnock will man up on this and agree to back the deal on condition that there’ll be a confirmatory referendum?

Poll: Who is responsible for the Brexit fiasco?

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:38 - Oct 12 with 329 viewsexiledclaseboy

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:35 - Oct 12 by bluey_the_blue

May's "deal" committed our army to defend EU interests post Brexit...


Does the Johnson “deal” remove that?

Poll: Tory leader

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:39 - Oct 12 with 327 viewslondonlisa2001

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:35 - Oct 12 by bluey_the_blue

May's "deal" committed our army to defend EU interests post Brexit...


That has absolutely no relevance to the point I’ve just made.

May’s deal means we leave. I was talking about staying in.

Btw - Johnson’s deal is unchanged from May’s deal and he’s a big brexiteer who’s ‘getting brexit done’ or at least, so you’ve told us all.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:39 - Oct 12 with 327 viewsCatullus

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:27 - Oct 12 by exiledclaseboy

The UK parliament legislated to allow EU law to take primacy. It even says that in the link you provided. Otherwise it couldn’t have happened. Because the UK parliament is and always has been sovereign.

So yes, a failure to understand. No matter how many times you provide that link you still fail to grasp that EU law only has primacy because the UK parliament allows it to. You really are spectacularly dim. You even reproduced the relevant sentence mun.
[Post edited 12 Oct 17:30]


Umm, no again. It actually says that non compliance with EU law is incompatible with continued membership so EU law takes Primacy, as it states at the top. The choice then becomes obey the EU law or take the punishment they decide on, or we exit the EU. As long as we are members, EU law overides UK law.

This is where you display a failure to understand. Copied and pasted from Wiki, Since its founding, the EU has operated among an increasing plurality of national and globalising legal systems.[90] This has meant both the European Court of Justice and the highest national courts have had to develop principles to resolve conflicts of laws between different systems. Within the EU itself, the Court of Justice's view is that if EU law conflicts with a provision of national law, then EU law has primacy.

It's you that doesn't understand.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:42 - Oct 12 with 321 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:37 - Oct 12 by Jango

Ye, the pattern is you using the same insults and one liners to try and impress your chums on here daily.


“Ye”?

Fûck me - William Shakespeare’s had a jug of mead.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:42 - Oct 12 with 320 viewslondonlisa2001

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:39 - Oct 12 by Catullus

Umm, no again. It actually says that non compliance with EU law is incompatible with continued membership so EU law takes Primacy, as it states at the top. The choice then becomes obey the EU law or take the punishment they decide on, or we exit the EU. As long as we are members, EU law overides UK law.

This is where you display a failure to understand. Copied and pasted from Wiki, Since its founding, the EU has operated among an increasing plurality of national and globalising legal systems.[90] This has meant both the European Court of Justice and the highest national courts have had to develop principles to resolve conflicts of laws between different systems. Within the EU itself, the Court of Justice's view is that if EU law conflicts with a provision of national law, then EU law has primacy.

It's you that doesn't understand.


This is insane.

We choose to implement the laws. We have complete control. You are posting stuff which supports what is being said yet continuing to argue that you’re right.
1
Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:44 - Oct 12 with 320 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:38 - Oct 12 by longlostjack

Surely Kinnock will man up on this and agree to back the deal on condition that there’ll be a confirmatory referendum?


He’s violently opposed to a second referendum. The pathetic twàt.
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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:45 - Oct 12 with 313 viewsexiledclaseboy

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:39 - Oct 12 by Catullus

Umm, no again. It actually says that non compliance with EU law is incompatible with continued membership so EU law takes Primacy, as it states at the top. The choice then becomes obey the EU law or take the punishment they decide on, or we exit the EU. As long as we are members, EU law overides UK law.

This is where you display a failure to understand. Copied and pasted from Wiki, Since its founding, the EU has operated among an increasing plurality of national and globalising legal systems.[90] This has meant both the European Court of Justice and the highest national courts have had to develop principles to resolve conflicts of laws between different systems. Within the EU itself, the Court of Justice's view is that if EU law conflicts with a provision of national law, then EU law has primacy.

It's you that doesn't understand.


F*ck me you’re hard work. Read this slowly.

The UK parliament passed a law that allows EU law to take primacy over UK law in areas that the EU has competence (look it up).

The UK parliament allowed and (for the moment) continues to allow EU law to take primacy. The UK parliament can pass a law that removes that at any time. It will do that if and when Brexit happens.

Because the UK parliament is sovereign over UK law.

No one is arguing that EU law takes primacy over UK law. No one. But it happens because the UK parliament allows it to. Because the UK parliament is sovereign.

Literally all of this is in the link you provided that you think proves you right. You read, but your comprehension skills are sorely lacking.

Poll: Tory leader

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Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:46 - Oct 12 with 310 viewsWarwickHunt

Countdown to the end of Democracy in the UK on 17:39 - Oct 12 by Catullus

Umm, no again. It actually says that non compliance with EU law is incompatible with continued membership so EU law takes Primacy, as it states at the top. The choice then becomes obey the EU law or take the punishment they decide on, or we exit the EU. As long as we are members, EU law overides UK law.

This is where you display a failure to understand. Copied and pasted from Wiki, Since its founding, the EU has operated among an increasing plurality of national and globalising legal systems.[90] This has meant both the European Court of Justice and the highest national courts have had to develop principles to resolve conflicts of laws between different systems. Within the EU itself, the Court of Justice's view is that if EU law conflicts with a provision of national law, then EU law has primacy.

It's you that doesn't understand.


Oh FFS...
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