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The Countdown begins. 23:28 - Nov 10 with 281539 viewspikeypaul



https://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20190329T23&p0=1336&msg=Democr

1:19 pm today was the exact mid point from when the result that the Great British public had decided to leave the EU and the time 11pm March 29th 2019 that Democracy will be delivered.

Happy days.
[Post edited 25 Jun 17:01]

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 15:21 - Jan 25 with 2101 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 12:32 - Jan 25 by Batterseajack

Have you googled the definition of the term 'Vassal State' yet?


He's still wondering who the fûck Dorothy Parker is.
1
The Countdown begins. on 15:27 - Jan 25 with 2099 viewslondonlisa2001

The Countdown begins. on 15:21 - Jan 25 by WarwickHunt

He's still wondering who the fûck Dorothy Parker is.


Google must be giving him a headache today as it features a picture of Virginia Woolf.
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The Countdown begins. on 16:28 - Jan 25 with 2063 viewsLord_Bony

The Countdown begins. on 07:44 - Jan 24 by pikeypaul

429 and fecking loving it


Jeez.

Is that how long this thread will go on for?


PROUD RECIPIENT OF THE THIRD PLANET SWANS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD. "Per ardua ad astra"
Poll: iS tHERE lIFE aFTER dEATH

0
The Countdown begins. on 19:01 - Jan 25 with 1989 viewsKilkennyjack

The Countdown begins. on 14:46 - Jan 25 by Ebo

You are such a dullard as the Brexit you want is just not going to happen sunshine. Your hard Brexit is not going to materialise. Anything other than a hard Brexit is not 'Brexit'.

I feel you will be throwing your dummy out next year when you don't get the Brexit you want.

The only leave I'd vote for is one that deports kunts like you and Farage out of the country and out of Europe.


Yes brawd

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

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The Countdown begins. on 19:19 - Jan 25 with 2001 viewsJack11

My personal view on leave/remain is not important, but what should never happen ever again is a campaign based on lies and innacuracies. All facts and figures for any election or referendum have to come from a centralised organisation and be referenced. No matter what side of the fence you are on surely you have to agree this is the only way forward. Even those who wanted to leave must see the hollowness of the victory when their small majority would have been wiped out had it not been for the lies regarding the nhs getting £350 mill extra.
1

The Countdown begins. on 19:30 - Jan 25 with 1961 viewsKilkennyjack

Today in the Times.

‘ Voting to leave the European Union has cost Britain more than £200 million a week in lost growth, the governor of the Bank of England believes.

Mark Carney indicated during a private breakfast meeting with business leaders in Davos that the country had forfeited about £10 billion a year in GDP since the June 2016 referendum. The Bank has been careful not to quantify the effect of the Brexit vote to avoid accusations of political interference.’

Well done PikeyPaul.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

1
The Countdown begins. on 19:32 - Jan 25 with 1982 viewslondonlisa2001

The Countdown begins. on 19:30 - Jan 25 by Kilkennyjack

Today in the Times.

‘ Voting to leave the European Union has cost Britain more than £200 million a week in lost growth, the governor of the Bank of England believes.

Mark Carney indicated during a private breakfast meeting with business leaders in Davos that the country had forfeited about £10 billion a year in GDP since the June 2016 referendum. The Bank has been careful not to quantify the effect of the Brexit vote to avoid accusations of political interference.’

Well done PikeyPaul.


You are forgetting that pikeypaul told us he voted to remain.

He forgets that he told us this as well mind, so not surprising. He's probably too busy with his portfolio,
1

The Countdown begins. on 19:36 - Jan 25 with 1975 viewsJack11

Ironically I was in France at the Euros on a spontaneous one so couldn’t vote! Who would have thought that Parisians could be even ruder!? They were certainly even more aloof after the vote and that’s saying something!
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The Countdown begins. on 06:20 - Jan 26 with 1907 viewspikeypaul

John Wayne’s batteries must have run out again, she has now resorted to lying since I have always said I voted remain but since changed my mind due to project fear being proven complete BS,

Oh I forgot it is only Leave voters that are allowed to change their minds.

At least now the remoaners have accepted we ARE coming out and like everyone knows acceptance is the first stage of getting over their grief,although some are still throwing their toys out of their prams, but these snowflake pussies working themselves into a frenzy are always going to exist,on the bright side it does make us laugh.

Anyway back to the cricket.

427 and fecking loving it more everyday..
[Post edited 26 Jan 6:31]

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

-1
The Countdown begins. on 06:50 - Jan 26 with 1899 viewspikeypaul

The Countdown begins. on 19:19 - Jan 25 by Jack11

My personal view on leave/remain is not important, but what should never happen ever again is a campaign based on lies and innacuracies. All facts and figures for any election or referendum have to come from a centralised organisation and be referenced. No matter what side of the fence you are on surely you have to agree this is the only way forward. Even those who wanted to leave must see the hollowness of the victory when their small majority would have been wiped out had it not been for the lies regarding the nhs getting £350 mill extra.


Jack11

The near 1,300,000 majority Leave won by would have been far larger if it was not for project fear with its immediate house price crash,stock market crash, emergency budget, all proven to be BS.

Like I said would have voted leave instead of remain knowing what I know now so the majority would have been a extra two just from me.

How do you know the nhs will not get the extra money on top of the £6 billion given in the last budget when we stop paying the £10billion a year we are still paying the EU ? like we are constantly told we are still in the sham and the £350m was said was possible once we are out and not paying the EUsomething you probably know but choose to ignore.

427 and fecking loving it more everyday.
[Post edited 26 Jan 7:35]

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

0

The Countdown begins. on 09:17 - Jan 26 with 1873 viewsWarwickHunt

I see you're not adding the transition period to your countdown to ecstasy, Einstein.

Going swimmingly, isn't it?


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-transition-period-draft-neg
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The Countdown begins. on 09:45 - Jan 26 with 1864 viewspikeypaul

29th March 2019 and we are out.

I am glad you have now accepted this, but obviously you are hurting big time and struggling seeing the days come down.

And yes it’s going very well despite your remoaner selective links, if you looked at the positives in life you would not be such a loser.


427 and fecking loving it more every day.
[Post edited 26 Jan 9:50]

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 10:04 - Jan 26 with 1847 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 09:45 - Jan 26 by pikeypaul

29th March 2019 and we are out.

I am glad you have now accepted this, but obviously you are hurting big time and struggling seeing the days come down.

And yes it’s going very well despite your remoaner selective links, if you looked at the positives in life you would not be such a loser.


427 and fecking loving it more every day.
[Post edited 26 Jan 9:50]


Out, but not out out as Mr Flanagan would say.

Dream on, sunshine.
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The Countdown begins. on 10:05 - Jan 26 with 1846 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 19:19 - Jan 25 by Jack11

My personal view on leave/remain is not important, but what should never happen ever again is a campaign based on lies and innacuracies. All facts and figures for any election or referendum have to come from a centralised organisation and be referenced. No matter what side of the fence you are on surely you have to agree this is the only way forward. Even those who wanted to leave must see the hollowness of the victory when their small majority would have been wiped out had it not been for the lies regarding the nhs getting £350 mill extra.


Every political campaign in history has been based on lies and inaccuracies. Lib dems will abolish tuition fees, corbyn will give lots of free stuff to everyone whilst rubbing off all their debts, strong and stable government etc.

The leave and remain campaigns were both shambolic in many ways, one portraying a glorious utopia, the other predicting an apocalyptic catastrophe with fire and brimstone as we all die screaming in agony. The truth, as always is placed somewhere smack bang in the middle.

The problem with your idea that "all facts and figures should come from a centralised organisation" is that there are no facts or figures. They'd essentially be predicting the future. How can we have facts and figures for what the country will be like in ten years, in or out of the EU? All we can do is guess based on opinion.

Also we've already had numerous "fact checking" websites set up as a response to "fake news" that claim to be independent verifiers but if you dig a bit deeper into them they are all financed by shady individuals with very obvious political bias, and many have been accused of using leading language to skew opinion the way they want, so they have ultimately become "fake news" themselves.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Poll: What’s your favourite crock?

1
The Countdown begins. on 10:23 - Jan 26 with 1832 viewspikeypaul

The Countdown begins. on 10:05 - Jan 26 by Highjack

Every political campaign in history has been based on lies and inaccuracies. Lib dems will abolish tuition fees, corbyn will give lots of free stuff to everyone whilst rubbing off all their debts, strong and stable government etc.

The leave and remain campaigns were both shambolic in many ways, one portraying a glorious utopia, the other predicting an apocalyptic catastrophe with fire and brimstone as we all die screaming in agony. The truth, as always is placed somewhere smack bang in the middle.

The problem with your idea that "all facts and figures should come from a centralised organisation" is that there are no facts or figures. They'd essentially be predicting the future. How can we have facts and figures for what the country will be like in ten years, in or out of the EU? All we can do is guess based on opinion.

Also we've already had numerous "fact checking" websites set up as a response to "fake news" that claim to be independent verifiers but if you dig a bit deeper into them they are all financed by shady individuals with very obvious political bias, and many have been accused of using leading language to skew opinion the way they want, so they have ultimately become "fake news" themselves.


100% correct.

Its all opinion, look how far out project fear has been proven and that was largely put out from the treasury,yet we have know nothing remoaners on a football site claiming to know what will happen in 5 years.

427 and fecking loving it.
[Post edited 26 Jan 10:32]

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 11:06 - Jan 26 with 1806 viewsBatterseajack

Time for a reality check....

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/25/business/theresa-may-brexit-davos.html

DAVOS, Switzerland — In the year and a half since Britain’s shocking decision to sever itself from the European Union, Prime Minister Theresa May has labored to portray her country’s future as one of glorious progress. She has described a bold new era in which Britain would look beyond the confines of Europe, striking trade deals and reclaiming its place as a global power.

All the while, an uncomfortable reality has been sinking in. Britain’s stature on the world stage has diminished, and its economy has sagged. The former colonial empire has been reduced to a lesser actor, a reality that hit home on Thursday as Mrs. May delivered a sparsely attended speech before the World Economic Forum.

Mrs. May devoted part of her speech to declaring Britain’s steadfast commitment to global trade and international engagement. But one of her primary examples of that commitment — highlighting Britain’s role in a European bloc it is actively leaving — underscored the strange moment she inhabits.

“The U.K. has been at the forefront of championing new trade deals including the E.U.’s deals with Canada and Japan,” Ms. May said. “And as we leave the European Union, the U.K. will continue to be a global advocate of free trade.”

The day before, President Emmanuel Macron of France had received rock star-style treatment from a packed crowd that waited nearly an hour for a chance just to get into the room where he was to speak. People who arrived a moment before Mrs. May’s speech found empty seats within a few rows of the stage.

Much of Britain’s receding status comes from its decision to abandon Europe — Brexit, in the parlance — and to remove itself from a realm of some 500 million people that sprawls from Ireland to Greece. Given that nearly half of Britain’s exports land within the European Union, any rupture to this trade could cost the country substantial treasure.

Around the world, every major economy is now growing in a synchronized wave of expansion that has finally put the finish on a wrenching global downturn that began a decade ago.

“It is the best moment in the global economy since the ’50s,” said Kenneth Rogoff, an international economist at Harvard University.

Britain stands out as one of the weaker performers. Its economy probably expanded by just 1.7 percent last year and is expected to grow by only 1.5 percent this year, according to the International Monetary Fund.

By contrast, the I.M.F. estimates that the United States economy will grow by 2.7 percent this year, and the 19 nations that share the euro currency will collectively expand by 2.2 percent.

Britain’s weak performance is due in large part to market sentiments about Brexit. The vote sent the British pound plunging against both the dollar and the euro. Although the pound has recovered much ground since then, Britain has been choking on the effects of the shift: A net importer of goods, Britain is paying higher prices for products it brings in from Europe, China and elsewhere, contributing to inflation that is running at a 3 percent annual pace.

And the country’s pending divorce from Europe has marginalized its role within the bloc just as European leaders are channeling the Continent’s newfound economic strength into furthering their integration.

“Who sees the U.K. as an important discussion partner?” asked Hans-Paul Bürkner, chairman of the Boston Consulting Group, based in Frankfurt.

In recent months, Mrs. May has pursued a split with Europe that changes as little as possible, while simultaneously trying to evade the wrath of anti-European members of Parliament in her governing Conservative Party.

Mrs. May’s government hopes to negotiate a transitional arrangement with Europe that allows Britain to remain within the single European marketplace and customs union to ensure that trade continues unabated.

The price of such arrangement will almost certainly be Britain’s continuing to make substantial contributions to the European budget while still living by European rules, including the free movement of people — the very item that provoked the electoral backlash that delivered the Brexit vote.

President Trump’s administration has sought to bolster Britain’s place in the world while offering its support for Brexit. Speaking to reporters on Thursday, Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, sought to reassure Britain that its so-called special relationship with the United States was intact.

“I do think we’ve had a very special economic relationship, and we expect that to continue,” Mr. Mnuchin said, hours before Mr. Trump was scheduled to meet privately with Mrs. May.

The president remained intent in striking a bilateral trade deal, Mr. Mnuchin added. “As soon as the U.K. is ready, we’d be prepared to negotiate a very attractive trade deal,” he said.

But so long as Britain remains within the European customs union, it cannot negotiate trade deals with other countries. Such negotiations are the sole preserve of European bureaucrats in Brussels.

And trade between the United States and Britain is already so free of tariffs that a deal would probably be of far more symbolic importance than a spur to increased commerce.

In her speech, Mrs. May steered clear of any discussion of the particulars of Brexit, instead devoting most of her time to calling for a new social compact that would bring social media platforms to heel for enabling trafficking in hate speech and facilitating communication among terrorists.

Above all, she cast Britain as a country that is not in retreat.

“The United Kingdom has a proud history of stepping up and seizing the opportunities of our time,” she said. “We stand ready to do so again.”

By that point, several people attending the speech were standing and walking toward the exits.
1

The Countdown begins. on 11:19 - Jan 26 with 1799 viewsBatterseajack

So the Governor of the bank of England says Brexit uncertainty costs the UK £200m a week in lost growth and we haven't left the single market yet. A smaller economy less money available for public services will be Brexits legacy.


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/brexit-costs-200m-every-week-in-lost-growth-s
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The Countdown begins. on 12:15 - Jan 26 with 1774 viewsHighjack

The Countdown begins. on 11:06 - Jan 26 by Batterseajack

Time for a reality check....

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/25/business/theresa-may-brexit-davos.html

DAVOS, Switzerland — In the year and a half since Britain’s shocking decision to sever itself from the European Union, Prime Minister Theresa May has labored to portray her country’s future as one of glorious progress. She has described a bold new era in which Britain would look beyond the confines of Europe, striking trade deals and reclaiming its place as a global power.

All the while, an uncomfortable reality has been sinking in. Britain’s stature on the world stage has diminished, and its economy has sagged. The former colonial empire has been reduced to a lesser actor, a reality that hit home on Thursday as Mrs. May delivered a sparsely attended speech before the World Economic Forum.

Mrs. May devoted part of her speech to declaring Britain’s steadfast commitment to global trade and international engagement. But one of her primary examples of that commitment — highlighting Britain’s role in a European bloc it is actively leaving — underscored the strange moment she inhabits.

“The U.K. has been at the forefront of championing new trade deals including the E.U.’s deals with Canada and Japan,” Ms. May said. “And as we leave the European Union, the U.K. will continue to be a global advocate of free trade.”

The day before, President Emmanuel Macron of France had received rock star-style treatment from a packed crowd that waited nearly an hour for a chance just to get into the room where he was to speak. People who arrived a moment before Mrs. May’s speech found empty seats within a few rows of the stage.

Much of Britain’s receding status comes from its decision to abandon Europe — Brexit, in the parlance — and to remove itself from a realm of some 500 million people that sprawls from Ireland to Greece. Given that nearly half of Britain’s exports land within the European Union, any rupture to this trade could cost the country substantial treasure.

Around the world, every major economy is now growing in a synchronized wave of expansion that has finally put the finish on a wrenching global downturn that began a decade ago.

“It is the best moment in the global economy since the ’50s,” said Kenneth Rogoff, an international economist at Harvard University.

Britain stands out as one of the weaker performers. Its economy probably expanded by just 1.7 percent last year and is expected to grow by only 1.5 percent this year, according to the International Monetary Fund.

By contrast, the I.M.F. estimates that the United States economy will grow by 2.7 percent this year, and the 19 nations that share the euro currency will collectively expand by 2.2 percent.

Britain’s weak performance is due in large part to market sentiments about Brexit. The vote sent the British pound plunging against both the dollar and the euro. Although the pound has recovered much ground since then, Britain has been choking on the effects of the shift: A net importer of goods, Britain is paying higher prices for products it brings in from Europe, China and elsewhere, contributing to inflation that is running at a 3 percent annual pace.

And the country’s pending divorce from Europe has marginalized its role within the bloc just as European leaders are channeling the Continent’s newfound economic strength into furthering their integration.

“Who sees the U.K. as an important discussion partner?” asked Hans-Paul Bürkner, chairman of the Boston Consulting Group, based in Frankfurt.

In recent months, Mrs. May has pursued a split with Europe that changes as little as possible, while simultaneously trying to evade the wrath of anti-European members of Parliament in her governing Conservative Party.

Mrs. May’s government hopes to negotiate a transitional arrangement with Europe that allows Britain to remain within the single European marketplace and customs union to ensure that trade continues unabated.

The price of such arrangement will almost certainly be Britain’s continuing to make substantial contributions to the European budget while still living by European rules, including the free movement of people — the very item that provoked the electoral backlash that delivered the Brexit vote.

President Trump’s administration has sought to bolster Britain’s place in the world while offering its support for Brexit. Speaking to reporters on Thursday, Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, sought to reassure Britain that its so-called special relationship with the United States was intact.

“I do think we’ve had a very special economic relationship, and we expect that to continue,” Mr. Mnuchin said, hours before Mr. Trump was scheduled to meet privately with Mrs. May.

The president remained intent in striking a bilateral trade deal, Mr. Mnuchin added. “As soon as the U.K. is ready, we’d be prepared to negotiate a very attractive trade deal,” he said.

But so long as Britain remains within the European customs union, it cannot negotiate trade deals with other countries. Such negotiations are the sole preserve of European bureaucrats in Brussels.

And trade between the United States and Britain is already so free of tariffs that a deal would probably be of far more symbolic importance than a spur to increased commerce.

In her speech, Mrs. May steered clear of any discussion of the particulars of Brexit, instead devoting most of her time to calling for a new social compact that would bring social media platforms to heel for enabling trafficking in hate speech and facilitating communication among terrorists.

Above all, she cast Britain as a country that is not in retreat.

“The United Kingdom has a proud history of stepping up and seizing the opportunities of our time,” she said. “We stand ready to do so again.”

By that point, several people attending the speech were standing and walking toward the exits.


The bias jumps out of that article from the very first line.

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.
Poll: What’s your favourite crock?

-1
The Countdown begins. on 12:35 - Jan 26 with 1763 viewspikeypaul

The Countdown begins. on 12:15 - Jan 26 by Highjack

The bias jumps out of that article from the very first line.


Of course it does.

But some are obviously still in denial. and that makes it all the the funnier that they can not accept reality.

The clueless t@sser says "Dream on " about us leaving the EU but I am talking reality and he's the dreamer thinking we won't leave,all I have to say is put on news at 10 on the great day and see who is correct.

Even Hammond is now admitting we will be CLEARLY out on 29th February 2018.

Any transitstion period only comes after we ARE OUT on the great day.

Suck it up losers.

427 and fecking loving it more every day.
[Post edited 26 Jan 13:34]

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 14:06 - Jan 26 with 1728 viewsEbo

The Countdown begins. on 12:35 - Jan 26 by pikeypaul

Of course it does.

But some are obviously still in denial. and that makes it all the the funnier that they can not accept reality.

The clueless t@sser says "Dream on " about us leaving the EU but I am talking reality and he's the dreamer thinking we won't leave,all I have to say is put on news at 10 on the great day and see who is correct.

Even Hammond is now admitting we will be CLEARLY out on 29th February 2018.

Any transitstion period only comes after we ARE OUT on the great day.

Suck it up losers.

427 and fecking loving it more every day.
[Post edited 26 Jan 13:34]


But we are not going to be really "out" are we?

Thank you, goodnight and bollocks
Poll: What couldn't you live without?

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The Countdown begins. on 02:36 - Jan 27 with 1657 viewspikeypaul

426 and fecking loving it more by the day.

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 03:09 - Jan 27 with 1651 viewspikeypaul

The Countdown begins. on 14:06 - Jan 26 by Ebo

But we are not going to be really "out" are we?


I think you’ll find we will be,but if denial and not being able to cope and deal with reality makes you happy that is you’re problem.

Besides if you lot of remoaners think we will not be out what are you all crying about?

Take a look at Wikipedia on the evening of 29th March 2019 and see the EU members you will not see the UK that’s for sure.

Suck it up remoaners.

426 and fecking loving it more every day.

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Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

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The Countdown begins. on 03:21 - Jan 27 with 1646 viewsEbo

The Countdown begins. on 03:09 - Jan 27 by pikeypaul

I think you’ll find we will be,but if denial and not being able to cope and deal with reality makes you happy that is you’re problem.

Besides if you lot of remoaners think we will not be out what are you all crying about?

Take a look at Wikipedia on the evening of 29th March 2019 and see the EU members you will not see the UK that’s for sure.

Suck it up remoaners.

426 and fecking loving it more every day.


The Brexit the hard of thinking voted for is NOT the Brexit they are going to get. They voted for a hard one and it's becoming increasingly clear that it's going to be a soft one.

I cannot wait to see the gnashing of teeth when it does happen.

t's like cancelling your sky account and still wanting the sports for free. Deluded Brexshitters.

Thank you, goodnight and bollocks
Poll: What couldn't you live without?

2
The Countdown begins. on 11:05 - Jan 27 with 1594 viewsWarwickHunt

The Countdown begins. on 03:09 - Jan 27 by pikeypaul

I think you’ll find we will be,but if denial and not being able to cope and deal with reality makes you happy that is you’re problem.

Besides if you lot of remoaners think we will not be out what are you all crying about?

Take a look at Wikipedia on the evening of 29th March 2019 and see the EU members you will not see the UK that’s for sure.

Suck it up remoaners.

426 and fecking loving it more every day.


I wouldn't put any money on it, sunshine.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jan/26/britons-favour-second-referendu
1
The Countdown begins. on 12:18 - Jan 27 with 1567 viewssherpajacob

The Countdown begins. on 11:05 - Jan 27 by WarwickHunt

I wouldn't put any money on it, sunshine.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jan/26/britons-favour-second-referendu


What's this?

A majority of people want to be able to have another vote.

"What part of democracy don't they understand?"

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