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The Countdown begins. 23:28 - Nov 10 with 236848 viewspikeypaul



https://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20190329T23&p0=1336&msg=Democr

1:19 pm today was the exact mid point from when the result that the Great British public had decided to leave the EU and the time 11pm March 29th 2019 that Democracy will be delivered.

Happy days.
[Post edited 25 Jun 17:01]

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

1
The Countdown begins. on 01:00 - Aug 28 with 584 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 21:34 - Aug 26 by peenemunde

That has got to be the stupidest thing i have ever read....EVER🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣😂🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣😂😂😂🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣😂😂😂😂😂🤣😂😂🤣🤣😂😂🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣😂😂🤣😂🤣🤣🤣😂🤣🤣🤣🤣😂🤣🤣😂🤣😂🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣😂🤣😂😂🤣🤣🤣😂🤣🤣🤣🤣😂🤣🤣🤣


Well we are and no amount of emojis is going to change it. Under international law we are an independent nation. It’s not disputable.

You’re thinking of freedom to act independently of any other nation, which obviously isn’t the case when we enter a union and develop common rules and agree to abide to them. But that’s something completely different to being an independent country/nation.
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The Countdown begins. on 07:31 - Aug 28 with 541 viewsKilkennyjack

The Countdown begins. on 23:24 - Aug 27 by Catullus

Yes we know, but then David Cameron came out and told the world the Government would honour the result whatever happened and nobody complained about that, not until they realised they'd lost and we voted to leave. It took the establishment by surprise. So all your "it was only advisory" BS can be ignored, the Prime minister made a public promise to honour the result, blame him!!
Though why he/they honoured that pledge when he/they never had a problem breaking promises before puzzles me....
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/6489626/David-Cameron-reneges-on-Tory-
They (well Cameron and Blair) both broke promises to give us a vote on the EU but I suppose when over 72% of the elctorate turn out it's not so easy to do a U turn.


Thanks for the reply.
I agree about cameron and blair.

Why was it specifically non binding if it was , well, binding ..?

And then the fact the Leave made illegal payments with such a small margin of victory.
Plus the huge exit bill - for nothing ?
And job losses and dire predictions by the government itself ?

A peoples vote, or a new GE mandate will kill Brexit.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

0

The Countdown begins. on 07:34 - Aug 28 with 538 viewspikeypaul

Another day closer to the great day when we are out .

213 AFLI

SUCK IT UP YOU REMOANER LOSERS.

🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧 🇬🇧
Poll: Next major war involving UK against a super power ?

1
The Countdown begins. on 09:15 - Aug 28 with 525 viewsCatullus

The Countdown begins. on 07:31 - Aug 28 by Kilkennyjack

Thanks for the reply.
I agree about cameron and blair.

Why was it specifically non binding if it was , well, binding ..?

And then the fact the Leave made illegal payments with such a small margin of victory.
Plus the huge exit bill - for nothing ?
And job losses and dire predictions by the government itself ?

A peoples vote, or a new GE mandate will kill Brexit.


The judiciary stated that no referendum can be binding in law, but, and this is the bit that seems to irk you, the standing Prime Minister told the world the government would honour the result. Then, when it went against what all the experts thought, what all the polls said and what Cameron wanted, he sh/t out and resigned.
Remainers do like to bang on about margin of victory, the margin doesn't matter and never has, otherwise we'd never have had devolution, many MP's would be having repeated by elections and several General elections would have been repeated too.
The huge exit bill for nothing? That's just an assumption on your part. If there's no deal, will we pay it? The government have already (well David Davis) said no.
Lastly the dire predictions. Well how much of project scare came true? Just today Theresa May rubbished Hammonds latest diatribe saying it was based on out of date figures. Many in the establishment are still fighting brexit and that in itself is causing some of the problems. Like when Carney interjected and the pound fell.
The Director General of the WTO has said "it would not be a walk in the park" but also "it would not be the end of the world"
You can predict a people's vote will kill brexit but all expert opinions were rubbished by the leave result which, although you don't like it, was a peoples vote and the people voted leave.
You know, we were told at the time it was a one off thing, there wouldn't be another referendum soon after, like in Ireland. We wited 43 years for this referendum and because the losers don't like it you want another one. Mostly, the experrts were wrong, the polls were wrong and mostly all the dire predictions have been wrong too. Unemployment is down, the economy has grown, there was no emergency budget, no tax rises, no bullets flying across Europe, no surge in unemployment.......and no matter how often it's repeated that all the doom mongers are wrong, you keep on pushing the argument that we are all doomed!!
Do I think brexit will be easy, NO and I never did. The EU is making it as hard as possible but, we will survive and prosper.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

2
The Countdown begins. on 09:43 - Aug 28 with 507 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 09:15 - Aug 28 by Catullus

The judiciary stated that no referendum can be binding in law, but, and this is the bit that seems to irk you, the standing Prime Minister told the world the government would honour the result. Then, when it went against what all the experts thought, what all the polls said and what Cameron wanted, he sh/t out and resigned.
Remainers do like to bang on about margin of victory, the margin doesn't matter and never has, otherwise we'd never have had devolution, many MP's would be having repeated by elections and several General elections would have been repeated too.
The huge exit bill for nothing? That's just an assumption on your part. If there's no deal, will we pay it? The government have already (well David Davis) said no.
Lastly the dire predictions. Well how much of project scare came true? Just today Theresa May rubbished Hammonds latest diatribe saying it was based on out of date figures. Many in the establishment are still fighting brexit and that in itself is causing some of the problems. Like when Carney interjected and the pound fell.
The Director General of the WTO has said "it would not be a walk in the park" but also "it would not be the end of the world"
You can predict a people's vote will kill brexit but all expert opinions were rubbished by the leave result which, although you don't like it, was a peoples vote and the people voted leave.
You know, we were told at the time it was a one off thing, there wouldn't be another referendum soon after, like in Ireland. We wited 43 years for this referendum and because the losers don't like it you want another one. Mostly, the experrts were wrong, the polls were wrong and mostly all the dire predictions have been wrong too. Unemployment is down, the economy has grown, there was no emergency budget, no tax rises, no bullets flying across Europe, no surge in unemployment.......and no matter how often it's repeated that all the doom mongers are wrong, you keep on pushing the argument that we are all doomed!!
Do I think brexit will be easy, NO and I never did. The EU is making it as hard as possible but, we will survive and prosper.


"end of the world" is a pretty low bar to set don't you think. What happened to the sun lit uplands?
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The Countdown begins. on 10:12 - Aug 28 with 486 viewsCatullus

The Countdown begins. on 09:43 - Aug 28 by Batterseajack

"end of the world" is a pretty low bar to set don't you think. What happened to the sun lit uplands?


Don't be obtuse, "it WOULD NOT be the end of the world, nor a walk in the park. When it comes to governments, international deals, how much of it is easy?
Why do so many people have so little faith in our country? Why are so many people convinced leaving means failure? Why do so many people dumbly accept what politicians tell us despite all the times we catch them lying, cheating and stealing and even worse, we dumbly accept massive rises in their number without question?
Why do we need the EU, Westminster and the WAG? 3 layers of high earning politicians where once we had one.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

1

The Countdown begins. on 10:12 - Aug 28 with 486 viewsBatterseajack

Government minister today is excited about opening up some reduced tariff access to the emerging markets in Africa. Good in some respect, Africa is rich in untapped natural resources and there will be lots of growth. But it will need to be a lot of growth as the entire wealth of Africa is 1/2 the GDP of France.
0
The Countdown begins. on 10:21 - Aug 28 with 479 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 10:12 - Aug 28 by Catullus

Don't be obtuse, "it WOULD NOT be the end of the world, nor a walk in the park. When it comes to governments, international deals, how much of it is easy?
Why do so many people have so little faith in our country? Why are so many people convinced leaving means failure? Why do so many people dumbly accept what politicians tell us despite all the times we catch them lying, cheating and stealing and even worse, we dumbly accept massive rises in their number without question?
Why do we need the EU, Westminster and the WAG? 3 layers of high earning politicians where once we had one.


The governments own civil service has carried out Brexit impact studies for each type of Brexit being discussed, and none of them show us to be better off. There are no credible studies that show otherwise. Yet people believe the slippery fu(ks like Gove, Boris, Liam Fox, Priti Patel, Ian Duncan Smith, JRM, John Redwood, Nadine Dorris etc. who respond to this with blaming everyone else, vacuous slogans and telling us to believe more.

"Why do so many people dumbly accept what politicians tell us despite all the times we catch them lying, cheating and stealing and even worse, we dumbly accept massive rises in their number without question?"

Good question!
[Post edited 28 Aug 10:22]
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The Countdown begins. on 10:30 - Aug 28 with 473 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 10:12 - Aug 28 by Batterseajack

Government minister today is excited about opening up some reduced tariff access to the emerging markets in Africa. Good in some respect, Africa is rich in untapped natural resources and there will be lots of growth. But it will need to be a lot of growth as the entire wealth of Africa is 1/2 the GDP of France.


Regardless of what the remainers have you believe, we’ll still be trading with France and the rest of the EU.
1
The Countdown begins. on 10:34 - Aug 28 with 468 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 10:30 - Aug 28 by Jango

Regardless of what the remainers have you believe, we’ll still be trading with France and the rest of the EU.


Regardless of what Brextreemists have you believe, increasing trade barriers in the form of tariffs, customs paper work, customs checks and quotas with the EU will reduce levels of trade.
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The Countdown begins. on 10:37 - Aug 28 with 462 viewsCatullus

The Countdown begins. on 10:12 - Aug 28 by Batterseajack

Government minister today is excited about opening up some reduced tariff access to the emerging markets in Africa. Good in some respect, Africa is rich in untapped natural resources and there will be lots of growth. But it will need to be a lot of growth as the entire wealth of Africa is 1/2 the GDP of France.


Well, having just looked, France had a gdp last year of 2.42 trillion but African Union gdp was 1.51 trillion. France was ranked 7th and Africa 11th. If it was just about trade with Africa you might have a point. Also, I can add the gdp from 13 other EU states together and they don't come close to Africa.
Look at it another way, we will be free to make deals with the USA, China and Japan who are the top 3 on the gdp table. Then add India who are 6th, just above France.
Maybe I can say that the USA has a GDP of roughly 2 trillion more than the EU, then if we add in Africa, China, India, Japan and lets not forget we will still trade with the EU and then ask why you think we'll be worse off?

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

1
The Countdown begins. on 10:53 - Aug 28 with 454 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 10:37 - Aug 28 by Catullus

Well, having just looked, France had a gdp last year of 2.42 trillion but African Union gdp was 1.51 trillion. France was ranked 7th and Africa 11th. If it was just about trade with Africa you might have a point. Also, I can add the gdp from 13 other EU states together and they don't come close to Africa.
Look at it another way, we will be free to make deals with the USA, China and Japan who are the top 3 on the gdp table. Then add India who are 6th, just above France.
Maybe I can say that the USA has a GDP of roughly 2 trillion more than the EU, then if we add in Africa, China, India, Japan and lets not forget we will still trade with the EU and then ask why you think we'll be worse off?


So we agree that Africa's economy is tiny.

We're not as free as you think to do deals with USA, China and Japan.

With the USA reopening the door for TTIP, do you think it will priorities a UK market over a the EU market given the relative sizes? Its unlikely they will deal with us both at the same time, because the terms of one deal could affect the other.

As for Japan, the terms of the Japan EU deal mean that in any future trade deal Japan might undertake with us, it will have to go back to the EU first and possibly negotiate terms for better of worse to accommodate its new relationship with the UK. Its complicated, and that's why deals take so long. With the UK needing in to rush through deals to limit the damage to its economy from being out on its own, how strong do you think our negotiating hand will really be?
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The Countdown begins. on 11:10 - Aug 28 with 447 viewsJango

The Countdown begins. on 10:34 - Aug 28 by Batterseajack

Regardless of what Brextreemists have you believe, increasing trade barriers in the form of tariffs, customs paper work, customs checks and quotas with the EU will reduce levels of trade.


Which is why TM is in Africa. The EU don’t want those tariffs, checks etc just as much as we don’t.
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The Countdown begins. on 11:36 - Aug 28 with 435 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 11:10 - Aug 28 by Jango

Which is why TM is in Africa. The EU don’t want those tariffs, checks etc just as much as we don’t.


See my earlier point about the African economy being tiny. The entire continent will have to more or less double the size of its economy just to match Frances current GDP.

Now don't mistake that as an argument against opening our doors to Africa, we really
should and our mining and oil and gas companies will do well. But don't be fooled into thinking that a bit of growth in Africa will offset the losses in UK GDP from what ever Brexit scenario we opt for.
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The Countdown begins. on 12:03 - Aug 28 with 424 viewslonglostjack

The Countdown begins. on 10:37 - Aug 28 by Catullus

Well, having just looked, France had a gdp last year of 2.42 trillion but African Union gdp was 1.51 trillion. France was ranked 7th and Africa 11th. If it was just about trade with Africa you might have a point. Also, I can add the gdp from 13 other EU states together and they don't come close to Africa.
Look at it another way, we will be free to make deals with the USA, China and Japan who are the top 3 on the gdp table. Then add India who are 6th, just above France.
Maybe I can say that the USA has a GDP of roughly 2 trillion more than the EU, then if we add in Africa, China, India, Japan and lets not forget we will still trade with the EU and then ask why you think we'll be worse off?


Why do you think that the UK will be able to sign a better trade deal with more favourable terms than the collective force of the EU are able to do?

Poll: Have our US owners improved Swansea City Football Club?

0
The Countdown begins. on 12:12 - Aug 28 with 417 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 12:03 - Aug 28 by longlostjack

Why do you think that the UK will be able to sign a better trade deal with more favourable terms than the collective force of the EU are able to do?


British exceptionalism?
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The Countdown begins. on 12:47 - Aug 28 with 397 viewsKilkennyjack

The Countdown begins. on 12:03 - Aug 28 by longlostjack

Why do you think that the UK will be able to sign a better trade deal with more favourable terms than the collective force of the EU are able to do?


Exactly.

These people are wishing and hoping.
They equate the view of experts with that of ‘Keith down the pub’.... its bollox.

And its hard working people who will suffer.
Not Boris, not Mogg, nor the Maybot.

Bollox to this Tory Brexit.

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

0

The Countdown begins. on 13:04 - Aug 28 with 386 viewsBatterseajack

I know this might be too long for some, but an important read nevertheless.

In laymans terms:

“But Germany, France and Italy won’t stop buying things from the UK if we leave” say the Brexiteers, they NEED us, and they won’t put us into a tariff regime, so says the Leave EU camp.

It won’t be a choice, it’s not a case of the EU damaging their imports to be spiteful to a UK that just voted to leave the EU. The fact is that there exists a document called the Treaty of the European Union and it sets out the very foundation of how the 28 member states work and cooperate together. It was part written by the UK and part drafted by UK lawyers.

It was agreed by all Member States that the EU would create a ‘thing’ called the “EU Common External Tariff Regime” for countries outside the EU that wanted to to trade with EU businesses. Different tariffs are in place for different product types. Higher for products the EU doesn’t desperately need and lower for the things it does need desperately like energy for example – which explains why Norway get such a good deal as around half of Norways exports to the EU is oil and gas.

When we tear up our membership card, Article 50 of the Treaty I mentioned comes into force. It says that a country that notifies the EU we are leaving the club all our agreements terminate 24 months after notification. When this happens (potentially summer 2018) we are automatically under the external tariff regime that the UK helped to draft and fully signed up to.

The ONLY way this could be changed is if the Treaty is changed. This requires the agreement of all remaining 27 countries. Many of whom have a referendum lock if there are any changes to the Treaty. It just isn’t feasibly possible to have all the necessary referendums and treaty change agreed by heads of state of 27 nations across Europe in the 2 year time limit.

Meanwhile we could continue to renegotiate the 4,500 plus different product groups that we trade with the EU to try and get lower tariffs on the things we buy and sell. This could take as much as a decade (or longer if other trade negotiations are any guide).

The point is that the UK becoming a part of the EU Tariff Regime (which meets WTO guidelines) is automatic if we elect to Leave and there is nothing that Germany, France or Spain or even the UK can do about it.

Currently we enjoy unlimited trade with the largest trading bloc on the planet free from duties, tariffs or quota and that is my main reason for voting to stay IN the EU.

It’s also worth noting that of all the top ten economies in the world every single one of them with a population of less than one billion people is a member of a continental trade bloc like the EU. Do we really think we are powerful enough to buck the trend of global trade and international economics? I think not. We are pretty good, but not *that* good.

p.s. You won’t find this information in the Fact Free Zone that is the Leave EU campaign, but fact check any of the above if you so wish.

1

The Countdown begins. on 15:54 - Aug 28 with 348 viewsFlashberryjack

https://lawyersforbritain.org/leaving-the-eu-on-wto-terms-pulling-down-the-barri

I wish I had a mate like Neath_Jack.

0
The Countdown begins. on 16:03 - Aug 28 with 335 viewsLeonWasGod

The Countdown begins. on 11:10 - Aug 28 by Jango

Which is why TM is in Africa. The EU don’t want those tariffs, checks etc just as much as we don’t.


So she's managed to secure promises for a future trade deal that replicates the one we already have with them through the EU, but we effectively had to spend £4bn to get it. I'm not seeing how that puts us in a better position or whether that's an affordable strategy if we take the same approach with all countries we currently have trade deals with via the EU (and that's before we get to those who we don't currently have deals with).

All seems a bit pointless to me. Still, never mind, match on tonight so we can forget about all this b0llox for a bit.
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The Countdown begins. on 16:06 - Aug 28 with 335 viewsKilkennyjack

The Countdown begins. on 13:04 - Aug 28 by Batterseajack

I know this might be too long for some, but an important read nevertheless.

In laymans terms:

“But Germany, France and Italy won’t stop buying things from the UK if we leave” say the Brexiteers, they NEED us, and they won’t put us into a tariff regime, so says the Leave EU camp.

It won’t be a choice, it’s not a case of the EU damaging their imports to be spiteful to a UK that just voted to leave the EU. The fact is that there exists a document called the Treaty of the European Union and it sets out the very foundation of how the 28 member states work and cooperate together. It was part written by the UK and part drafted by UK lawyers.

It was agreed by all Member States that the EU would create a ‘thing’ called the “EU Common External Tariff Regime” for countries outside the EU that wanted to to trade with EU businesses. Different tariffs are in place for different product types. Higher for products the EU doesn’t desperately need and lower for the things it does need desperately like energy for example – which explains why Norway get such a good deal as around half of Norways exports to the EU is oil and gas.

When we tear up our membership card, Article 50 of the Treaty I mentioned comes into force. It says that a country that notifies the EU we are leaving the club all our agreements terminate 24 months after notification. When this happens (potentially summer 2018) we are automatically under the external tariff regime that the UK helped to draft and fully signed up to.

The ONLY way this could be changed is if the Treaty is changed. This requires the agreement of all remaining 27 countries. Many of whom have a referendum lock if there are any changes to the Treaty. It just isn’t feasibly possible to have all the necessary referendums and treaty change agreed by heads of state of 27 nations across Europe in the 2 year time limit.

Meanwhile we could continue to renegotiate the 4,500 plus different product groups that we trade with the EU to try and get lower tariffs on the things we buy and sell. This could take as much as a decade (or longer if other trade negotiations are any guide).

The point is that the UK becoming a part of the EU Tariff Regime (which meets WTO guidelines) is automatic if we elect to Leave and there is nothing that Germany, France or Spain or even the UK can do about it.

Currently we enjoy unlimited trade with the largest trading bloc on the planet free from duties, tariffs or quota and that is my main reason for voting to stay IN the EU.

It’s also worth noting that of all the top ten economies in the world every single one of them with a population of less than one billion people is a member of a continental trade bloc like the EU. Do we really think we are powerful enough to buck the trend of global trade and international economics? I think not. We are pretty good, but not *that* good.

p.s. You won’t find this information in the Fact Free Zone that is the Leave EU campaign, but fact check any of the above if you so wish.



A top contribution.

Thank you.

Feck this Tory Brexit. 🇪🇺🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿
[Post edited 28 Aug 16:07]

‘Beware of the risen people’ ........🍀🇮🇪 💚 YesCymru 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿

0
The Countdown begins. on 16:23 - Aug 28 with 326 viewslonglostjack

The Countdown begins. on 15:54 - Aug 28 by Flashberryjack

https://lawyersforbritain.org/leaving-the-eu-on-wto-terms-pulling-down-the-barri


An interesting read but too much focus on oranges! There are not any trade deals that purely focus on one product. They are complex and take years of negotiations. I'll see you your lawyers and raise you mine.

http://lawyers-inforbritain.uk/briefings/brexit-and-international-trade-treaties
[Post edited 28 Aug 16:24]

Poll: Have our US owners improved Swansea City Football Club?

1
The Countdown begins. on 16:37 - Aug 28 with 314 viewsBatterseajack

The Countdown begins. on 15:54 - Aug 28 by Flashberryjack

https://lawyersforbritain.org/leaving-the-eu-on-wto-terms-pulling-down-the-barri


Here you go...

The UK negotiators offer to drop tariffs on oranges (something this potential FTA partner produces and UK doesn't) for a concession on something the UK wants. Awesome, but here's how the partner might look at it:

They know that politically this is a freebie for the UK to give away. There's no big domestic industry lobbying to keep orange tariffs high, so dropping it doesn't require difficult conversations at home. That cheapens the concession a bit.

They also know this is likely to be something the UK will be looking to trade away in every FTA with an orange producer. That means, every other FTA the UK signs with an orange producer is likely to dilute the advantage this concession offers, cheapening it again.

They also know that their primary competition may be from countries covered under the preferential agreements the UK has indicated it plans to roll over. Cheaper still. For example, oranges from South Africa enter the EU at a 0% tariff rate because of an EPA.

None of this is to say orange producing negotiating partners won't want an FTA to deliver orange market access to the UK. They will. However, it's important to be realistic in evaluating how much the UK will be able to secure for it.

[Post edited 28 Aug 16:41]
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The Countdown begins. on 22:35 - Aug 28 with 242 viewsCatullus

The Countdown begins. on 13:04 - Aug 28 by Batterseajack

I know this might be too long for some, but an important read nevertheless.

In laymans terms:

“But Germany, France and Italy won’t stop buying things from the UK if we leave” say the Brexiteers, they NEED us, and they won’t put us into a tariff regime, so says the Leave EU camp.

It won’t be a choice, it’s not a case of the EU damaging their imports to be spiteful to a UK that just voted to leave the EU. The fact is that there exists a document called the Treaty of the European Union and it sets out the very foundation of how the 28 member states work and cooperate together. It was part written by the UK and part drafted by UK lawyers.

It was agreed by all Member States that the EU would create a ‘thing’ called the “EU Common External Tariff Regime” for countries outside the EU that wanted to to trade with EU businesses. Different tariffs are in place for different product types. Higher for products the EU doesn’t desperately need and lower for the things it does need desperately like energy for example – which explains why Norway get such a good deal as around half of Norways exports to the EU is oil and gas.

When we tear up our membership card, Article 50 of the Treaty I mentioned comes into force. It says that a country that notifies the EU we are leaving the club all our agreements terminate 24 months after notification. When this happens (potentially summer 2018) we are automatically under the external tariff regime that the UK helped to draft and fully signed up to.

The ONLY way this could be changed is if the Treaty is changed. This requires the agreement of all remaining 27 countries. Many of whom have a referendum lock if there are any changes to the Treaty. It just isn’t feasibly possible to have all the necessary referendums and treaty change agreed by heads of state of 27 nations across Europe in the 2 year time limit.

Meanwhile we could continue to renegotiate the 4,500 plus different product groups that we trade with the EU to try and get lower tariffs on the things we buy and sell. This could take as much as a decade (or longer if other trade negotiations are any guide).

The point is that the UK becoming a part of the EU Tariff Regime (which meets WTO guidelines) is automatic if we elect to Leave and there is nothing that Germany, France or Spain or even the UK can do about it.

Currently we enjoy unlimited trade with the largest trading bloc on the planet free from duties, tariffs or quota and that is my main reason for voting to stay IN the EU.

It’s also worth noting that of all the top ten economies in the world every single one of them with a population of less than one billion people is a member of a continental trade bloc like the EU. Do we really think we are powerful enough to buck the trend of global trade and international economics? I think not. We are pretty good, but not *that* good.

p.s. You won’t find this information in the Fact Free Zone that is the Leave EU campaign, but fact check any of the above if you so wish.



Look I get it, you chose remain because of the single market, trade etc. To a lot of people there was a lot more to brexit than trade and tariffs. Democracy for a start.

As for Kilkenny and his "tory brexit" maybe he ignores that very many Labour voters chose leave too. Would brexit be handled any better by Corbyn, he already showed his cards to everyone when he said he'd never leave without a deal.

It doesn't natter which politician we talk about, brexit would have been a mess because they are all useless. In which case we'd have been better not having the referendum, but we did and nothing can change that now. The battle lines are drawn.

Just my opinion, but WTF do I know anyway?
Blog: In, Out, in, out........

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The Countdown begins. on 23:33 - Aug 28 with 222 viewsthe_oracle

The Countdown begins. on 22:35 - Aug 28 by Catullus

Look I get it, you chose remain because of the single market, trade etc. To a lot of people there was a lot more to brexit than trade and tariffs. Democracy for a start.

As for Kilkenny and his "tory brexit" maybe he ignores that very many Labour voters chose leave too. Would brexit be handled any better by Corbyn, he already showed his cards to everyone when he said he'd never leave without a deal.

It doesn't natter which politician we talk about, brexit would have been a mess because they are all useless. In which case we'd have been better not having the referendum, but we did and nothing can change that now. The battle lines are drawn.


"democracy" Really? We know the reason why the majority of leavers voted out , and it certainly wasn't "democracy".
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